Books Recently Received

Books Recently Received October , 1933 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING 245 A n Important Text-Book on Air Navigation- Timbe r Nomenclature—Official Handbooks I n view of the appointment of the Gorell Manual of Air Navigation. [A. P. 1456]. and of an index. It is a book well worth Committee, a still further edition, revised, (H.M. Stationery Office. 8s. 6d.) possessing even by those who do not fly, the will presumably soon be necessary. Aerial Navigation has not yet conic into its trigonometry section alone being of great own. It is a little doubtful if it ever will value to the engineering community. The omission of an index is a pity as the Table of Th e Hart Aeroplane. [A.P. 1404, Vol. I.] during this generation. Man is by nature Contents does not fill the same purpose. The (H.M. Stationery Office. 2s.) prone to accept, and use, the line of least resistance, and those pilots who in their early reservation of paragraphs for subsequent ex­ An addition to the admirable series of Air stages are apt to follow railways in preference pansion is a good idea, but at the moment Ministry text-books in which the R.A.F. to keeping "re d on red " are equally likely to the work appears as if it could be reduced Day Bomber, with the 510-h.p. non-super- demand wireless directional or homing devices in places, the average person wishing to know charged Rolls-Royce Kestrel I.B. engine, is in preference to the use of star's. However "ho w to do a sum," the proof that the method described. much we may be able to put aerial navigation employed is correct being immaterial. in all its branches into effect on paper, when it The work should have a large and wide Th e Panther II A . Engine. [A.P. 1428, comes to its practical application without the sale. G. W. F. Vol. I.J (H.M. Stationery Office. 4s. 6d.) use of wireless it fails in its object. It is A similar descriptive handbook on this understood that even our record long-distance Propertie s and Strength of Materials . By moderately supercharged 14-cylinder two-row flight pilots did not know where they were for J . D. Haddon, B.Sc , A.F.R.Ae.S. (Pit­ radial of 585 rated horse-power at rated alti­ some considerable time as "they had no tud e of 3,000 ft. One cannot help expressing man. 8s. 6d.) means of checking earlier sights." Hinkler again one's admiration of the general get-up This volume is one of a series entitled "An used a thorough knowledge of air pilotage. of these handbooks. The illustrations, in Introduction to Aeronautical Engineering." The Mollisons presumably work on the same particular, are most remarkable. For value for So far as this particular volume is concerned, basis. Imperial Airways use wireless. The money they must be quite unequalled anywhere its contents go to prove that an introduction taxi-pilot of the small machine uses a vast in the world, and anyone closely studying them to aeronautical engineering is bu t little different store of accumulated knowledge of air pilotage could not help but amass an enormous amount from an introduction to any other branch of and takes a machine through weather the air of practical knowledge, and indeed quite a engineering. liners go above. He has no wireless and no useful quantity of theory. As we have re­ The title of the book would have been ren­ sextant, but he gets there because he under­ marked before, however, their practical value dered more descriptive by the insertion of the stands the fundamentals and knows how to would be very greatly enhanced by the pro­ word "Metallic" as the subjects dealt with apply them. vision of indexes, the extra cost of which cover metallurgy, testing of metals and applied should be comparatively trifling. But all this does not mean to say that aerial mechanics. The subject matter is set out with navigation is no use. It is of decided use if clarity in an easily understood form. it can be applied, and when the time comes Britis h Standard Nomenclature of Timber The whole advantage of the publication for regular transatlantic flights aerial navigation for Aircraft Purposes. (British Standards seems to lie in the fact that the elements of the by sextant may come into its own. three subjects referred to have been brought Institution . 2s.) under one cover. This list of aeronautical timbers originally We should, therefore, be prepared. The formed part of the B. S. Glossary of Aero­ Manual of Air Navigation sets out to prepare J . J. A. G. nautical Terms, but has been dropped from the us in a very thorough and praiseworthy manner. It first recognises that a sound grounding in new edition and issued separately in this re­ Fluglehre . By R. von Mises. (Julius plane trigonometry and logarithms is essential. vised form. Every known timber with an Springer. Berlin. 15·5 marks.) The way in which this subject is dealt with aeronautical application is given with its This is the fourth edition of an elementary should allow even those with no previous standar d and botanical names, sources of book on the theory and practice of aviation. supply, application to aircraft, characteristics experience to understand their use and applica­ Like most similar publications it makes one and alternative names which are current but tion. Spherical trigonometry is nex t explained. wonder whether it is possible to be satisfactorily considered less satisfactory than those selected This is well done, although those who have "elementary " about aviation. These books, for standardisation. A strong committee com­ never previously studied the subject may have a as a rule, and this is no exception, seem to little difficulty at first in understanding what prising representatives of the Air Ministry, fall between two stools. They introduce it is all about. Probably it would have Imperial Institute, Forest Products Research graphs and diagrams which are scarcely com­ been better to have treated it on the lines Laboratory, S.B.A.C, and Timber Trades prehensible to the wholly ignorant, and yet adopted by Comdr. John Macnab, R.N.R., Federation of the United Kingdom, under the are extremely unsatisfying for the serious chairmanship of Dr. S. E. Chandler—has been in his Trigonometry for Seamen, where he student . A case in point is the table of relative engaged on the production of this list for gives less detail and allows the result to be resistance of variously-shaped bodies on page 39, some time. obtained without too much why and wherefore. which, in form, dates back, if memory is correct, to Moedebek's "Pocket Book of The chapters on chart and map projection Aeronautics," of 1897 or thereabouts. are extremely well done and explain the R.A.F . Pocket Book, 1932. [A.P. 1081.] process of the projections in a manner more The table of engine data on pages 180 an d 181 (H.M. Stationery Office. 2s.) clearly than has been found in other works badly needs revision. The Anzani is not an This is one of those compendia, like the on this subject. Most pilots in the past have Italian engine, and it comes as a surprise to similar Army Field Service Pocket Book, found considerable difficulty in understanding learn that the Rolls-Royce is American. which it is impossible to review. To give projections other than the Mercator's pro­ Notable omissions from this table are the even an indication of the variety of the con­ jection. There is now no further need for this tent s would fill columns. It covers every Armstrong-Siddeley and Bristol British engines difficulty. The chapters on dead reckoning; conceivable side of Air Force life; from the and the Pratt and Whitney American. calculating the track and distance; instru­ organization of the R.A.F. in war, and duties ments, are all good, and examples are worked of the staff, to the best way of disposing of Manua l of Electric Are Welding. Edited out by methods involving the practical use of rain water from a tent or bivouac; including, by E. H. Hubert. (MiGraw Hill. 12s.) spherical trigonometry. Astronomical naviga­ surprisingly enough, instructions in the art This is a useful and practical handbook for tion in all its branches is next dealt with. of constructing a traverse, and slinging a cask. designers, engineers and operators. It covers Examples of practical air work are given The field of knowledge between these extremes the whole ground of the theory and practice and the whole subject is presented in a manner is, of course, encyclopœdic, but most of it of welding, though it is mainly concerned which should be understandable to the average appears to be covered here. with work on heavy structures, steam pipes, person. The following, and concluding, portion etc. Any of the books mentioned above can be of the work deals with the nautical almanac, obtained from compass work, tides, and wireless directional Pilot' s 'A ' Licence. By John F . Leeming. finding, several useful appendices bringing the (Fifth Edition. Pitman. 3s. 6d.) AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING work to a close. I t is not surprising that this useful little 4, Clements Inn A. P . 1456, t o give the work the title by which guide to British licensing requirements for Strand it will be known, is worthy of a better cover private flying continues to call for new editions. London, W.C.2. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

Books Recently Received

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, Volume 5 (10): 1 – Oct 1, 1933

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Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb029731
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Abstract

October , 1933 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING 245 A n Important Text-Book on Air Navigation- Timbe r Nomenclature—Official Handbooks I n view of the appointment of the Gorell Manual of Air Navigation. [A. P. 1456]. and of an index. It is a book well worth Committee, a still further edition, revised, (H.M. Stationery Office. 8s. 6d.) possessing even by those who do not fly, the will presumably soon be necessary. Aerial Navigation has not yet conic into its trigonometry section alone being of great own. It is a little doubtful if it ever will value to the engineering community. The omission of an index is a pity as the Table of Th e Hart Aeroplane. [A.P. 1404, Vol. I.] during this generation. Man is by nature Contents does not fill the same purpose. The (H.M. Stationery Office. 2s.) prone to accept, and use, the line of least resistance, and those pilots who in their early reservation of paragraphs for subsequent ex­ An addition to the admirable series of Air stages are apt to follow railways in preference pansion is a good idea, but at the moment Ministry text-books in which the R.A.F. to keeping "re d on red " are equally likely to the work appears as if it could be reduced Day Bomber, with the 510-h.p. non-super- demand wireless directional or homing devices in places, the average person wishing to know charged Rolls-Royce Kestrel I.B. engine, is in preference to the use of star's. However "ho w to do a sum," the proof that the method described. much we may be able to put aerial navigation employed is correct being immaterial. in all its branches into effect on paper, when it The work should have a large and wide Th e Panther II A . Engine. [A.P. 1428, comes to its practical application without the sale. G. W. F. Vol. I.J (H.M. Stationery Office. 4s. 6d.) use of wireless it fails in its object. It is A similar descriptive handbook on this understood that even our record long-distance Propertie s and Strength of Materials . By moderately supercharged 14-cylinder two-row flight pilots did not know where they were for J . D. Haddon, B.Sc , A.F.R.Ae.S. (Pit­ radial of 585 rated horse-power at rated alti­ some considerable time as "they had no tud e of 3,000 ft. One cannot help expressing man. 8s. 6d.) means of checking earlier sights." Hinkler again one's admiration of the general get-up This volume is one of a series entitled "An used a thorough knowledge of air pilotage. of these handbooks. The illustrations, in Introduction to Aeronautical Engineering." The Mollisons presumably work on the same particular, are most remarkable. For value for So far as this particular volume is concerned, basis. Imperial Airways use wireless. The money they must be quite unequalled anywhere its contents go to prove that an introduction taxi-pilot of the small machine uses a vast in the world, and anyone closely studying them to aeronautical engineering is bu t little different store of accumulated knowledge of air pilotage could not help but amass an enormous amount from an introduction to any other branch of and takes a machine through weather the air of practical knowledge, and indeed quite a engineering. liners go above. He has no wireless and no useful quantity of theory. As we have re­ The title of the book would have been ren­ sextant, but he gets there because he under­ marked before, however, their practical value dered more descriptive by the insertion of the stands the fundamentals and knows how to would be very greatly enhanced by the pro­ word "Metallic" as the subjects dealt with apply them. vision of indexes, the extra cost of which cover metallurgy, testing of metals and applied should be comparatively trifling. But all this does not mean to say that aerial mechanics. The subject matter is set out with navigation is no use. It is of decided use if clarity in an easily understood form. it can be applied, and when the time comes Britis h Standard Nomenclature of Timber The whole advantage of the publication for regular transatlantic flights aerial navigation for Aircraft Purposes. (British Standards seems to lie in the fact that the elements of the by sextant may come into its own. three subjects referred to have been brought Institution . 2s.) under one cover. This list of aeronautical timbers originally We should, therefore, be prepared. The formed part of the B. S. Glossary of Aero­ Manual of Air Navigation sets out to prepare J . J. A. G. nautical Terms, but has been dropped from the us in a very thorough and praiseworthy manner. It first recognises that a sound grounding in new edition and issued separately in this re­ Fluglehre . By R. von Mises. (Julius plane trigonometry and logarithms is essential. vised form. Every known timber with an Springer. Berlin. 15·5 marks.) The way in which this subject is dealt with aeronautical application is given with its This is the fourth edition of an elementary should allow even those with no previous standar d and botanical names, sources of book on the theory and practice of aviation. supply, application to aircraft, characteristics experience to understand their use and applica­ Like most similar publications it makes one and alternative names which are current but tion. Spherical trigonometry is nex t explained. wonder whether it is possible to be satisfactorily considered less satisfactory than those selected This is well done, although those who have "elementary " about aviation. These books, for standardisation. A strong committee com­ never previously studied the subject may have a as a rule, and this is no exception, seem to little difficulty at first in understanding what prising representatives of the Air Ministry, fall between two stools. They introduce it is all about. Probably it would have Imperial Institute, Forest Products Research graphs and diagrams which are scarcely com­ been better to have treated it on the lines Laboratory, S.B.A.C, and Timber Trades prehensible to the wholly ignorant, and yet adopted by Comdr. John Macnab, R.N.R., Federation of the United Kingdom, under the are extremely unsatisfying for the serious chairmanship of Dr. S. E. Chandler—has been in his Trigonometry for Seamen, where he student . A case in point is the table of relative engaged on the production of this list for gives less detail and allows the result to be resistance of variously-shaped bodies on page 39, some time. obtained without too much why and wherefore. which, in form, dates back, if memory is correct, to Moedebek's "Pocket Book of The chapters on chart and map projection Aeronautics," of 1897 or thereabouts. are extremely well done and explain the R.A.F . Pocket Book, 1932. [A.P. 1081.] process of the projections in a manner more The table of engine data on pages 180 an d 181 (H.M. Stationery Office. 2s.) clearly than has been found in other works badly needs revision. The Anzani is not an This is one of those compendia, like the on this subject. Most pilots in the past have Italian engine, and it comes as a surprise to similar Army Field Service Pocket Book, found considerable difficulty in understanding learn that the Rolls-Royce is American. which it is impossible to review. To give projections other than the Mercator's pro­ Notable omissions from this table are the even an indication of the variety of the con­ jection. There is now no further need for this tent s would fill columns. It covers every Armstrong-Siddeley and Bristol British engines difficulty. The chapters on dead reckoning; conceivable side of Air Force life; from the and the Pratt and Whitney American. calculating the track and distance; instru­ organization of the R.A.F. in war, and duties ments, are all good, and examples are worked of the staff, to the best way of disposing of Manua l of Electric Are Welding. Edited out by methods involving the practical use of rain water from a tent or bivouac; including, by E. H. Hubert. (MiGraw Hill. 12s.) spherical trigonometry. Astronomical naviga­ surprisingly enough, instructions in the art This is a useful and practical handbook for tion in all its branches is next dealt with. of constructing a traverse, and slinging a cask. designers, engineers and operators. It covers Examples of practical air work are given The field of knowledge between these extremes the whole ground of the theory and practice and the whole subject is presented in a manner is, of course, encyclopœdic, but most of it of welding, though it is mainly concerned which should be understandable to the average appears to be covered here. with work on heavy structures, steam pipes, person. The following, and concluding, portion etc. Any of the books mentioned above can be of the work deals with the nautical almanac, obtained from compass work, tides, and wireless directional Pilot' s 'A ' Licence. By John F . Leeming. finding, several useful appendices bringing the (Fifth Edition. Pitman. 3s. 6d.) AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING work to a close. I t is not surprising that this useful little 4, Clements Inn A. P . 1456, t o give the work the title by which guide to British licensing requirements for Strand it will be known, is worthy of a better cover private flying continues to call for new editions. London, W.C.2.

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Oct 1, 1933

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