Books and Publicity

Books and Publicity No one concerned for the dignity of letters can have failed to notice the increasing voracity and audibility of publishers' advertising of recent years. With this in mind I have been studying the literary section of an issue of the Observer. The results are disquieting. The Books of the Day feature runs from page 4 to page 9. On page 4 the text proper occupies three centre columns not quite full columns, for Michael Joseph butts in with an advertisement across the foot. It is flanked on the left by Hodder and Stoughton, a twocolumn spread from top to bottom on the right is another twocolumn spread of which Victor Gollancz has the lion's share. Hodder's display is a series of drab shaded panels, Gollancz's is a characteristically resonant proclamation in heavy type the two in opposition strike discords in the midst of which the actual matter of the book reviews twitters faintly like a virginal trying to be heard in a massmeeting of trombones and bugles. Page 5 is split clean in half, three columns being devoted to text and the remaindera massive fourcolumn spreadbeing again dedicated to Mr. Gollancz's commercial purposes. Page 6 repeats the talethree columns of text to four of advertisements. On pages 7 and 8 the proportion of advertisement to text is equally heavy. On page 9 the last of the literary section the comparatively decent pomp of Harrap and Cassell is to the forefrontbut by some oversight a dividend of two halfcolumns of text above the average quota has been allowed to creep in. In all, the six book pages of one of our leading Sunday journals are carved up, roughly, as text, nineteen columns advertisements, twentythree columns. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Library Review Emerald Publishing

Books and Publicity

Library Review, Volume 7 (2): 9 – Feb 1, 1939

Loading next page...
 
/lp/emerald-publishing/books-and-publicity-Ni3PzTCuSZ
Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0024-2535
DOI
10.1108/eb060401
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

No one concerned for the dignity of letters can have failed to notice the increasing voracity and audibility of publishers' advertising of recent years. With this in mind I have been studying the literary section of an issue of the Observer. The results are disquieting. The Books of the Day feature runs from page 4 to page 9. On page 4 the text proper occupies three centre columns not quite full columns, for Michael Joseph butts in with an advertisement across the foot. It is flanked on the left by Hodder and Stoughton, a twocolumn spread from top to bottom on the right is another twocolumn spread of which Victor Gollancz has the lion's share. Hodder's display is a series of drab shaded panels, Gollancz's is a characteristically resonant proclamation in heavy type the two in opposition strike discords in the midst of which the actual matter of the book reviews twitters faintly like a virginal trying to be heard in a massmeeting of trombones and bugles. Page 5 is split clean in half, three columns being devoted to text and the remaindera massive fourcolumn spreadbeing again dedicated to Mr. Gollancz's commercial purposes. Page 6 repeats the talethree columns of text to four of advertisements. On pages 7 and 8 the proportion of advertisement to text is equally heavy. On page 9 the last of the literary section the comparatively decent pomp of Harrap and Cassell is to the forefrontbut by some oversight a dividend of two halfcolumns of text above the average quota has been allowed to creep in. In all, the six book pages of one of our leading Sunday journals are carved up, roughly, as text, nineteen columns advertisements, twentythree columns.

Journal

Library ReviewEmerald Publishing

Published: Feb 1, 1939

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off