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Book Reviews

Book Reviews ZERO TOLERANCE POLICING RESEARCHING CRIMINAL JUSTICE SERIES Punch M Policy Press, Bristol (2007) Price: £14.99 ISBN: 978 1 84742 055 8 In the last years of the last century, ‘zero-tolerance policing’ was proclaimed as a solution to the problem of reducing crime. It fitted with the ‘tough on crime’ agenda of New Labour and made reputations for one or two individuals. The rigorous enforcement principles embodied in the model were assumed to be causal in the reduction in crime in New York and therefore extremely attractive to politicians and policy-makers. However, in this reviewer’s opinion, underpinning it were some puzzling assumptions. Among them, that officers were routinely ignoring infractions of the law, discretion should be strictly limited and the cautious Crown Prosecution Service would enthusiastically join in the plethora of prosecutions for minor matters. It was allegedly based on the famous ‘Broken windows’ thesis (Wilson & Kelling, 1982), but if that was the case, it amounted at best to an over-simplification of its message or at worst a misreading. Additionally, there was much more to the New York revolution than an aggressive policing. There had been a dramatic increase in personnel and a ‘top-down’ ruthless management style based on http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Safer Communities Emerald Publishing

Book Reviews

Safer Communities , Volume 7 (2): 4 – Apr 1, 2008

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
1757-8043
DOI
10.1108/17578043200800017
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ZERO TOLERANCE POLICING RESEARCHING CRIMINAL JUSTICE SERIES Punch M Policy Press, Bristol (2007) Price: £14.99 ISBN: 978 1 84742 055 8 In the last years of the last century, ‘zero-tolerance policing’ was proclaimed as a solution to the problem of reducing crime. It fitted with the ‘tough on crime’ agenda of New Labour and made reputations for one or two individuals. The rigorous enforcement principles embodied in the model were assumed to be causal in the reduction in crime in New York and therefore extremely attractive to politicians and policy-makers. However, in this reviewer’s opinion, underpinning it were some puzzling assumptions. Among them, that officers were routinely ignoring infractions of the law, discretion should be strictly limited and the cautious Crown Prosecution Service would enthusiastically join in the plethora of prosecutions for minor matters. It was allegedly based on the famous ‘Broken windows’ thesis (Wilson & Kelling, 1982), but if that was the case, it amounted at best to an over-simplification of its message or at worst a misreading. Additionally, there was much more to the New York revolution than an aggressive policing. There had been a dramatic increase in personnel and a ‘top-down’ ruthless management style based on

Journal

Safer CommunitiesEmerald Publishing

Published: Apr 1, 2008

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