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Body and Tail Moments in Spin

Body and Tail Moments in Spin IN the May, 1933, number of AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING there was published an article by KorvinKroukovsky on the uncontrolled tail spin, in which one of the main points put forward was that during a spin both the body and the tail were very largely shielded by the wings. It was then argued from this that danger might be expected more especially in the lowwing monoplane type and also the biplane with big forward stagger of wings. At the time there was very little direct evidence on the effect of wings on body and tail moment although an early report on the Bantam, an unstaggered biplane which had spun into the ground, had shown pretty clearly that it was the tailplane which was responsible for the complete blanketing or even reversal of the fin and rudder in a flat spin, and that this could be remedied by raising the tailplanc. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb030081
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

IN the May, 1933, number of AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING there was published an article by KorvinKroukovsky on the uncontrolled tail spin, in which one of the main points put forward was that during a spin both the body and the tail were very largely shielded by the wings. It was then argued from this that danger might be expected more especially in the lowwing monoplane type and also the biplane with big forward stagger of wings. At the time there was very little direct evidence on the effect of wings on body and tail moment although an early report on the Bantam, an unstaggered biplane which had spun into the ground, had shown pretty clearly that it was the tailplane which was responsible for the complete blanketing or even reversal of the fin and rudder in a flat spin, and that this could be remedied by raising the tailplanc.

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Aug 1, 1936

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