Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Birds of Prey of the East: A Field Guide

Birds of Prey of the East: A Field Guide So to return to the book. Each species gets around ten pages. I have picked at random Swinson’s Hawk. Science and technology The first description is of the juvenile and one-year bird perching and the description is of colour variation, habitat, size and voice. The second description covers the young bird in flight. These are RR 2018/203 then repeated for the adult bird perching and then in flight. All these are illustrated by bird portraits by the author. Paintings allow specific examples and details Brian K. Wheeler to be made clear. (A practice that botanists have long Princeton University Press made use of). The next page gives background about Princeton, NJ and Oxford habitat, nesting, movements (that is migratory movements) and comment on similar looking birds. The status notes the places they have been observed. 296 pp. Swinson’s Hawk is highly migratory and the map only ISBN 978 0 691 11706 5 (print); ISBN 978 1 400 89016 3 (e-book) shows various sightings. Other, more common, birds £22 $27.95 Princeton Field Guides have winter, summer and permanent range plus occasional sites. For some birds the maps stretch as Keywords Birds, Canada, United States of America far as Greenland and Iceland. There are one or Review DOI 10.1108/RR-08-2018-0128 occasionally more photographs, of typical habitat. The maps are full page and a big enough to be annotated I suppose I have to explain that East is the east of by the reader as they identify birds. There is plenty of the USA and Canada, east of the Mississippi- guidance before the species pages on how to use the Missouri and across the border to follow the edge book and how to identify birds of the prey including of Manitoba to Hudson Bay. The author has been detail of moult in the (now) three orders. There is a painting, photographing and studying birds, and separate sectiononbirds of prey in Florida where the particularly birds of prey for more than 50 years. species are to some extent tropical and some The book is in the Princeton Field Guides series. information on western birds of prey that sometimes The Guide starts with an account of bird cross the divide. There is also a long account of taxonomy. Until recently all the birds in the book plumage variation in the “eastern” red-tailed hawk would have counted as Falconiformes. However, which leads to a proposal of identifying a sub-species. recent work, mainly using DNA data, has shown This a very useful and exceptionally detailed field that falcons are nearer to parrots and songbirds. The guide to birds of prey in eastern North America. You other birds of prey, eagles, harriers, hawks, kites and may have guessed there is a companion guide, Birds of osprey, are now in a new order Accipitriformes. Prey of the West, also by Wheeler, which I’ve also seen and Since that decision the vultures have been moved to is just as good as its eastern counterpart reviewed here. their own order Cathartiformes. (In several reviews John Goodier of field guides I have commented on the new DNA Consultant, Goldhawk Information, London, UK based taxonomy, but none of the other groups has been so profoundly altered. It should be pointed out that the species and subspecies are still valid.) The author sticks with the lay term ‘birds of prey’ and RR 2018/204 falcons get into the book, plus a couple of vultures that do hunt small prey. He does offer to the bird Canids of the World: Wolves, Wild Dogs, observer evidence for the realignment based on the Foxes, Jackals, Coyotes and their Relatives pattern of moult in falcons, parrots and the eagle Jose´ R. Castello groups.Heassumes,rightly,thatmostfield ornithologist will look for a bird of prey. I am quite Princeton University Press used to seeing the whole range including some owls Princeton, NJ and Oxford appearing in demonstrations of falconry. There is a distinction in hunting with birds of prey between xi 1 325 pp. hawks and falcons. Falcons set off to hunt from a ISBN 978 0 691 18372 5 (hbck); ISBN 978 0 691 17685 7 raised vantage point, and so will sit on the handler’s fist while hawks fly from tree branches and will sit on (pbck); ISBN 978 0 691 18541 5 (e-book) the handler’s wrist. The difference here has nothing £62 $79.95 (hbck); £24 $29.95 (pbck) to do with taxonomy but with individual bird’s Princeton Field Guides preferences – the owls are falcons! Keywords Guides and handbooks, Mammals Review DOI 10.1108/RR-08-2018-0126 Reference Reviews Canids of the World is another volume in the Volume 32 · Number 7/8 · 2018 · pp. 29–36 © Emerald Publishing Limited · ISSN 0950-4125 Princeton Field Guides series and deals with a http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Reference Reviews Emerald Publishing

Birds of Prey of the East: A Field Guide

Reference Reviews , Volume 32 (7/8): 1 – Sep 17, 2018

Loading next page...
 
/lp/emerald-publishing/birds-of-prey-of-the-east-a-field-guide-K4WXcpEbXO
Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0950-4125
DOI
10.1108/RR-08-2018-0128
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

So to return to the book. Each species gets around ten pages. I have picked at random Swinson’s Hawk. Science and technology The first description is of the juvenile and one-year bird perching and the description is of colour variation, habitat, size and voice. The second description covers the young bird in flight. These are RR 2018/203 then repeated for the adult bird perching and then in flight. All these are illustrated by bird portraits by the author. Paintings allow specific examples and details Brian K. Wheeler to be made clear. (A practice that botanists have long Princeton University Press made use of). The next page gives background about Princeton, NJ and Oxford habitat, nesting, movements (that is migratory movements) and comment on similar looking birds. The status notes the places they have been observed. 296 pp. Swinson’s Hawk is highly migratory and the map only ISBN 978 0 691 11706 5 (print); ISBN 978 1 400 89016 3 (e-book) shows various sightings. Other, more common, birds £22 $27.95 Princeton Field Guides have winter, summer and permanent range plus occasional sites. For some birds the maps stretch as Keywords Birds, Canada, United States of America far as Greenland and Iceland. There are one or Review DOI 10.1108/RR-08-2018-0128 occasionally more photographs, of typical habitat. The maps are full page and a big enough to be annotated I suppose I have to explain that East is the east of by the reader as they identify birds. There is plenty of the USA and Canada, east of the Mississippi- guidance before the species pages on how to use the Missouri and across the border to follow the edge book and how to identify birds of the prey including of Manitoba to Hudson Bay. The author has been detail of moult in the (now) three orders. There is a painting, photographing and studying birds, and separate sectiononbirds of prey in Florida where the particularly birds of prey for more than 50 years. species are to some extent tropical and some The book is in the Princeton Field Guides series. information on western birds of prey that sometimes The Guide starts with an account of bird cross the divide. There is also a long account of taxonomy. Until recently all the birds in the book plumage variation in the “eastern” red-tailed hawk would have counted as Falconiformes. However, which leads to a proposal of identifying a sub-species. recent work, mainly using DNA data, has shown This a very useful and exceptionally detailed field that falcons are nearer to parrots and songbirds. The guide to birds of prey in eastern North America. You other birds of prey, eagles, harriers, hawks, kites and may have guessed there is a companion guide, Birds of osprey, are now in a new order Accipitriformes. Prey of the West, also by Wheeler, which I’ve also seen and Since that decision the vultures have been moved to is just as good as its eastern counterpart reviewed here. their own order Cathartiformes. (In several reviews John Goodier of field guides I have commented on the new DNA Consultant, Goldhawk Information, London, UK based taxonomy, but none of the other groups has been so profoundly altered. It should be pointed out that the species and subspecies are still valid.) The author sticks with the lay term ‘birds of prey’ and RR 2018/204 falcons get into the book, plus a couple of vultures that do hunt small prey. He does offer to the bird Canids of the World: Wolves, Wild Dogs, observer evidence for the realignment based on the Foxes, Jackals, Coyotes and their Relatives pattern of moult in falcons, parrots and the eagle Jose´ R. Castello groups.Heassumes,rightly,thatmostfield ornithologist will look for a bird of prey. I am quite Princeton University Press used to seeing the whole range including some owls Princeton, NJ and Oxford appearing in demonstrations of falconry. There is a distinction in hunting with birds of prey between xi 1 325 pp. hawks and falcons. Falcons set off to hunt from a ISBN 978 0 691 18372 5 (hbck); ISBN 978 0 691 17685 7 raised vantage point, and so will sit on the handler’s fist while hawks fly from tree branches and will sit on (pbck); ISBN 978 0 691 18541 5 (e-book) the handler’s wrist. The difference here has nothing £62 $79.95 (hbck); £24 $29.95 (pbck) to do with taxonomy but with individual bird’s Princeton Field Guides preferences – the owls are falcons! Keywords Guides and handbooks, Mammals Review DOI 10.1108/RR-08-2018-0126 Reference Reviews Canids of the World is another volume in the Volume 32 · Number 7/8 · 2018 · pp. 29–36 © Emerald Publishing Limited · ISSN 0950-4125 Princeton Field Guides series and deals with a

Journal

Reference ReviewsEmerald Publishing

Published: Sep 17, 2018

There are no references for this article.