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Beware of the patient safety juggernauts

Beware of the patient safety juggernauts Patient safety and medical error have become prominent issues following publication of Institute of Medicine reports in the USA. The USA, Australia, and now Canada have followed a national "medical error" studies path that uses language rejected by the interdisciplinary group of experts described previously in this column, and continues using methods considered seriously flawed as well as incomplete by noteworthy hospital epidemiologists. Preliminary review of British hospitals by similar methods also has been published. Proven and more cost-effective surveillance methods are pertinent methods developed over the past several decades by hospital epidemiology and infection control professionals who have more experience, but this heritage has been ignored in recent patient safety juggernauts. It is time to question why retrospective physician chart review approaches remain in vogue with national bodies to enumerate adverse patient outcomes and attribute them with "medical error" when better alternatives exist. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png British Journal of Clinical Governance Emerald Publishing

Beware of the patient safety juggernauts

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 MCB UP Ltd. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1466-4100
DOI
10.1108/14664100210446687
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Patient safety and medical error have become prominent issues following publication of Institute of Medicine reports in the USA. The USA, Australia, and now Canada have followed a national "medical error" studies path that uses language rejected by the interdisciplinary group of experts described previously in this column, and continues using methods considered seriously flawed as well as incomplete by noteworthy hospital epidemiologists. Preliminary review of British hospitals by similar methods also has been published. Proven and more cost-effective surveillance methods are pertinent methods developed over the past several decades by hospital epidemiology and infection control professionals who have more experience, but this heritage has been ignored in recent patient safety juggernauts. It is time to question why retrospective physician chart review approaches remain in vogue with national bodies to enumerate adverse patient outcomes and attribute them with "medical error" when better alternatives exist.

Journal

British Journal of Clinical GovernanceEmerald Publishing

Published: Dec 1, 2002

Keywords: Safety; Health care; Quality; Surveillance; Methodology

References