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Beverage made from babassu nut kernels and grape fruit: physicochemical properties and sensory acceptance

Beverage made from babassu nut kernels and grape fruit: physicochemical properties and sensory... The purpose of this study was to develop plant-based babassu milk flavored with grape fruit (GF).Design/methodology/approachA four mixed beverages formulations containing 15%, 25%, 35% and 45% GF were produced. The pH, titratable acidity (TA), soluble solids (SS), sugar: acid ratio and color analysis were performed. Sensory evaluation was measured by the hedonic scale, just-about-right (JAR) scale and purchase intent. Moreover, a check-all-that-apply (CATA) form was applied to obtain description data on the formulations.FindingsThe pH values of mixed beverages decreased (p < 0.05) when the concentration of GF increased, while the TA and the SS increased (p < 0.05). The GF addition provided the product with greater opaque and redness. Sensory evaluation revealed good consumer acceptance. For the hedonic scale, 35% and 45% GF contributed to the higher acceptance of color, appearance, flavor and overall liking attributes. For JAR data, the flavor grape term was highest in the JAR region (51%) with 45% GF. Based on the frequency of terms cited by consumers in the CATA test, the treatment with 15% GF was described by babassu flavor, strange and low astringency terms. For purchase intent, most consumers would buy the product with 35% and 45% GF.Originality/valueThis study demonstrates that babassu, an almond little used industrially, is an alternate to plant-based milk. The higher sensory acceptance occurs when 45% GF is used for its flavoring. The CATA indicated that ideal sweetness, striking, acid and ideal grape flavor described the better beverage. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png British Food Journal Emerald Publishing

Beverage made from babassu nut kernels and grape fruit: physicochemical properties and sensory acceptance

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
© Emerald Publishing Limited
ISSN
0007-070X
DOI
10.1108/bfj-09-2020-0783
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to develop plant-based babassu milk flavored with grape fruit (GF).Design/methodology/approachA four mixed beverages formulations containing 15%, 25%, 35% and 45% GF were produced. The pH, titratable acidity (TA), soluble solids (SS), sugar: acid ratio and color analysis were performed. Sensory evaluation was measured by the hedonic scale, just-about-right (JAR) scale and purchase intent. Moreover, a check-all-that-apply (CATA) form was applied to obtain description data on the formulations.FindingsThe pH values of mixed beverages decreased (p < 0.05) when the concentration of GF increased, while the TA and the SS increased (p < 0.05). The GF addition provided the product with greater opaque and redness. Sensory evaluation revealed good consumer acceptance. For the hedonic scale, 35% and 45% GF contributed to the higher acceptance of color, appearance, flavor and overall liking attributes. For JAR data, the flavor grape term was highest in the JAR region (51%) with 45% GF. Based on the frequency of terms cited by consumers in the CATA test, the treatment with 15% GF was described by babassu flavor, strange and low astringency terms. For purchase intent, most consumers would buy the product with 35% and 45% GF.Originality/valueThis study demonstrates that babassu, an almond little used industrially, is an alternate to plant-based milk. The higher sensory acceptance occurs when 45% GF is used for its flavoring. The CATA indicated that ideal sweetness, striking, acid and ideal grape flavor described the better beverage.

Journal

British Food JournalEmerald Publishing

Published: Jun 28, 2021

Keywords: Plant-based milk; Attalea speciosa; Fruit juice; Color; Penalty analysis; Check-all-that-apply

References