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Better Late

Better Late Aircraft Engineering THE MONTHLY SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL ORGAN OF THE AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING PROFESSION VOL XIX No 226 DECEMBER 1947 draulic system may be hit and put out of action by a chance shell, bullet, or fragment, than a small object, strictly localized near the E publish in this issue the third and final instalment of an tab, such as a spring. Similarly, in commercial aeroplanes there is exhaustive survey of the spring tab—a device to make more likelihood of a complicated installation failing in service than a somewhat easier the onerous task of the pilot in control­ single item of equipment. Breakdown in a hydraulic system of oper­ ling his mount at the high speeds of modern flight. We feel that it is ation of any part of an aeroplane is bad enough, and, for this reason, only fair to M R F. B. BAKER, the author, that we should make it in many instances of its use—as with the undercarriage—emergency clear that his article was written over two years ago and was, in fact, hand control is fitted, but in the case of the actual flying controls submitted to us so long ago as November 1945. The long—and, we the possibility of failure cannot lightly be contemplated. readily admit, from his point of view unconscionable—delay has For these reasons, we do not think that we shall yet see the dis­ been due to the difficulties of setting the somewhat complicated appearance of the spring tab in the classes of aeroplane for which it mathematics involved, combined with the problem of finding space is suitable and, therefore, we feel that M R BAKER'S thesis on the in three successive issues for a paper of this length. The mathematical subject is still of much more than merely historical interest. incubus has been so much the burthen of our monthly song in recent issues that we will refrain from enlarging on it again here, except to Manufacturing Methods emphasize that this is an example of the effect it can have in holding We devote considerable space in this issue to a description by the up the appearance of a contribution. TECHNICAL EDITOR of the methods used by the DE HAVILLAND AIR- CRAFT COMPANY in the manufacture of the Dove, one of the most Still Relevant successful commercial aeroplanes produced since the war; as has In this particular instance we actually at one period despaired of been widely recognized by the placing of a considerable number of its ever achieving publication and we do feel that it is incumbent on orders which has made it worth the Company's while to go in us to relieve M R BAKER of all responsibility for the belated appear­ for tooling on an extensive scale, as is evidenced in the article. ance of an article on a subject which had at the time he wrote it a We are grateful to the Company not only for the facilities for perhaps greater degree of topicality than it might be said to have obtaining the necessary information which they so generously afford­ today. On the other hand we do not think it can reasonably be argued ed, but for the excellent series of most informative photographs that later developments have in any sense superseded the spring tab which they were good enough to have specially taken for us to illus­ or made it an out-of-date or obsolescent form of servo control. trate specific points. Pilots of British machines such as the Gloster Meteor and the In these days it is not possible to print articles of this type as Supermarine Attacker continue to find the device an essential aid frequently as we did before the recent war disrupted our economic and a notable contribution to their comfort. The hydraulic 'assister' life. Rather, however, than reduce the value of the articles by making which is fitted to, for instance, the Lockheed Shooting Star, has its them shorter, and so less informative, we have deemed it better to drawbacks—with which we will deal in a moment—and next month retain their character but space them out and publish them at longer we shall be publishing an account of the development of the Re­ intervals. public Rainbow in which it is mentioned that the spring tab system We do not, therefore, hope to publish more than three, or four was preferred, and the reasons for favouring it. at most, such contributions in the course of a year—the last being, The necessity, of course, for the invention of this special form of of course, that on the production of the AEROSUDEST 2010 which tab—by whom, we unfortunately have no knowledge—was to leave appeared in our July and August issues. the pilot with all the advantage of the sensitivity of direct operation of the control surface at low speeds while relieving him of the burden A Different Procedure of extra physical effort required at high speeds by switching his There is one other point to which we might perhaps call attention. ' control over to the tab, through the coming into operation of a It is, as readers are well aware, our general policy to publish only spring, to do the work of moving the surface. articles on their own special subjects contributed by experts from Government circles or the Industry. In the case of descriptions of The Alternative individual methods of manufacture adopted by various firms it is not, however, possible to adhere to this policy and we have found it The hydraulic 'assister' does, in effect, the same thing but has two more satisfactory for the TECHNICAL EDITOR himself to write the disadvantages. In the first place, like all hydraulic controls, it comes articles after spending some days at the firm concerned in order to directly between the pilot and his control surface and deprives him familiarize himself with every facet. This has, incidentally, the ad­ of the sense of 'feel' which all pilots like to have. It also depends vantage of enabling him to call attention to differences of practice for its effectiveness on the continued functioning of the whole between one production engineering staff and another, with which hydraulic system of the aeroplane. In combat aeroplanes used by the they are not necessarily themselves aware. Services it is obviously more likely that some portion of the hy­ Your Subscription Complaints continue to be received that prospective readers are unable to place orders for the regular supply of AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING with local newsagents. There is no smallest justification for any newsagent stating that he is unable to obtain copies as the publishers are now in a position to meet all demands. Readers who experience any difficulty should therefore communicate with the Subscription Department at 12 Bloomsbury Square, London, W.C.I enclosing 30s. 0d. for a direct annual subscription, post free, or giving the name and address of the news­ agent concerned, in order that the matter may be investigated. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

Better Late

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 19 (12): 1 – Dec 1, 1947

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb031577
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Aircraft Engineering THE MONTHLY SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL ORGAN OF THE AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING PROFESSION VOL XIX No 226 DECEMBER 1947 draulic system may be hit and put out of action by a chance shell, bullet, or fragment, than a small object, strictly localized near the E publish in this issue the third and final instalment of an tab, such as a spring. Similarly, in commercial aeroplanes there is exhaustive survey of the spring tab—a device to make more likelihood of a complicated installation failing in service than a somewhat easier the onerous task of the pilot in control­ single item of equipment. Breakdown in a hydraulic system of oper­ ling his mount at the high speeds of modern flight. We feel that it is ation of any part of an aeroplane is bad enough, and, for this reason, only fair to M R F. B. BAKER, the author, that we should make it in many instances of its use—as with the undercarriage—emergency clear that his article was written over two years ago and was, in fact, hand control is fitted, but in the case of the actual flying controls submitted to us so long ago as November 1945. The long—and, we the possibility of failure cannot lightly be contemplated. readily admit, from his point of view unconscionable—delay has For these reasons, we do not think that we shall yet see the dis­ been due to the difficulties of setting the somewhat complicated appearance of the spring tab in the classes of aeroplane for which it mathematics involved, combined with the problem of finding space is suitable and, therefore, we feel that M R BAKER'S thesis on the in three successive issues for a paper of this length. The mathematical subject is still of much more than merely historical interest. incubus has been so much the burthen of our monthly song in recent issues that we will refrain from enlarging on it again here, except to Manufacturing Methods emphasize that this is an example of the effect it can have in holding We devote considerable space in this issue to a description by the up the appearance of a contribution. TECHNICAL EDITOR of the methods used by the DE HAVILLAND AIR- CRAFT COMPANY in the manufacture of the Dove, one of the most Still Relevant successful commercial aeroplanes produced since the war; as has In this particular instance we actually at one period despaired of been widely recognized by the placing of a considerable number of its ever achieving publication and we do feel that it is incumbent on orders which has made it worth the Company's while to go in us to relieve M R BAKER of all responsibility for the belated appear­ for tooling on an extensive scale, as is evidenced in the article. ance of an article on a subject which had at the time he wrote it a We are grateful to the Company not only for the facilities for perhaps greater degree of topicality than it might be said to have obtaining the necessary information which they so generously afford­ today. On the other hand we do not think it can reasonably be argued ed, but for the excellent series of most informative photographs that later developments have in any sense superseded the spring tab which they were good enough to have specially taken for us to illus­ or made it an out-of-date or obsolescent form of servo control. trate specific points. Pilots of British machines such as the Gloster Meteor and the In these days it is not possible to print articles of this type as Supermarine Attacker continue to find the device an essential aid frequently as we did before the recent war disrupted our economic and a notable contribution to their comfort. The hydraulic 'assister' life. Rather, however, than reduce the value of the articles by making which is fitted to, for instance, the Lockheed Shooting Star, has its them shorter, and so less informative, we have deemed it better to drawbacks—with which we will deal in a moment—and next month retain their character but space them out and publish them at longer we shall be publishing an account of the development of the Re­ intervals. public Rainbow in which it is mentioned that the spring tab system We do not, therefore, hope to publish more than three, or four was preferred, and the reasons for favouring it. at most, such contributions in the course of a year—the last being, The necessity, of course, for the invention of this special form of of course, that on the production of the AEROSUDEST 2010 which tab—by whom, we unfortunately have no knowledge—was to leave appeared in our July and August issues. the pilot with all the advantage of the sensitivity of direct operation of the control surface at low speeds while relieving him of the burden A Different Procedure of extra physical effort required at high speeds by switching his There is one other point to which we might perhaps call attention. ' control over to the tab, through the coming into operation of a It is, as readers are well aware, our general policy to publish only spring, to do the work of moving the surface. articles on their own special subjects contributed by experts from Government circles or the Industry. In the case of descriptions of The Alternative individual methods of manufacture adopted by various firms it is not, however, possible to adhere to this policy and we have found it The hydraulic 'assister' does, in effect, the same thing but has two more satisfactory for the TECHNICAL EDITOR himself to write the disadvantages. In the first place, like all hydraulic controls, it comes articles after spending some days at the firm concerned in order to directly between the pilot and his control surface and deprives him familiarize himself with every facet. This has, incidentally, the ad­ of the sense of 'feel' which all pilots like to have. It also depends vantage of enabling him to call attention to differences of practice for its effectiveness on the continued functioning of the whole between one production engineering staff and another, with which hydraulic system of the aeroplane. In combat aeroplanes used by the they are not necessarily themselves aware. Services it is obviously more likely that some portion of the hy­ Your Subscription Complaints continue to be received that prospective readers are unable to place orders for the regular supply of AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING with local newsagents. There is no smallest justification for any newsagent stating that he is unable to obtain copies as the publishers are now in a position to meet all demands. Readers who experience any difficulty should therefore communicate with the Subscription Department at 12 Bloomsbury Square, London, W.C.I enclosing 30s. 0d. for a direct annual subscription, post free, or giving the name and address of the news­ agent concerned, in order that the matter may be investigated.

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Dec 1, 1947

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