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Being there for each other – who fills the gaps? A case of a young person with a neurological disability by a children's social worker and a case manager

Being there for each other – who fills the gaps? A case of a young person with a neurological... Purpose – This article is based on a case study jointly presented by Lyndy‐Lee Green, Brain Injury Case Manager and Jo Dicks, Children's Social Worker, describing their experiences of joint working on a case of a young man who sustained a brain injury at birth. It aims to describe a model of successful collaborative delivery of a personalised service, and to demonstrate what can help or hinder professional relationships and client outcomes. Design/methodology/approach – A joint perspective on a three year period of collaborative work with one client was obtained from a case manager in private practice and a social worker in statutory services, with reference made to the current legislative context in health and social care. The findings were discussed with reference to: implementation of the personalised agenda; guidance and practice methods used by case managers in private practice; and understanding of the difficulties caused by brain injury in young people. Findings – The availability of statutory services was found to be insufficient in comparison with the collaborative input received by one young man with a brain injury, utilising available statutory services, and supplemented by private funding aiming to maximise quality of life. The paper identified a number of elements that contribute to effective joint working: communication and the value of face to face meetings; maintaining the client's goals and needs at the centre of all decision making; joint responsibility and positive risk taking; understanding and valuing roles; rapid response to crisis situations and contingency planning; the need for planned and coordinated transition; knowledge of brain injury; autonomous decision making, supported at organisational level; and creativity. Originality/value – There is little evidence examining the issues that arise at the convergence of private case management and statutory service provision, particularly where funding for services is not the primary concern. This case study highlights the collaborative practice that can be achieved working across the boundaries of statutory services and private practice and provides an insight into the complexity of the needs of young people with brain injury in the community. This article will be of interest to practising case managers, and to social work care managers. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Social Care and Neurodisability Emerald Publishing

Being there for each other – who fills the gaps? A case of a young person with a neurological disability by a children's social worker and a case manager

Social Care and Neurodisability , Volume 3 (1): 9 – Feb 17, 2012

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2012 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
2042-0919
DOI
10.1108/20420911211207017
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – This article is based on a case study jointly presented by Lyndy‐Lee Green, Brain Injury Case Manager and Jo Dicks, Children's Social Worker, describing their experiences of joint working on a case of a young man who sustained a brain injury at birth. It aims to describe a model of successful collaborative delivery of a personalised service, and to demonstrate what can help or hinder professional relationships and client outcomes. Design/methodology/approach – A joint perspective on a three year period of collaborative work with one client was obtained from a case manager in private practice and a social worker in statutory services, with reference made to the current legislative context in health and social care. The findings were discussed with reference to: implementation of the personalised agenda; guidance and practice methods used by case managers in private practice; and understanding of the difficulties caused by brain injury in young people. Findings – The availability of statutory services was found to be insufficient in comparison with the collaborative input received by one young man with a brain injury, utilising available statutory services, and supplemented by private funding aiming to maximise quality of life. The paper identified a number of elements that contribute to effective joint working: communication and the value of face to face meetings; maintaining the client's goals and needs at the centre of all decision making; joint responsibility and positive risk taking; understanding and valuing roles; rapid response to crisis situations and contingency planning; the need for planned and coordinated transition; knowledge of brain injury; autonomous decision making, supported at organisational level; and creativity. Originality/value – There is little evidence examining the issues that arise at the convergence of private case management and statutory service provision, particularly where funding for services is not the primary concern. This case study highlights the collaborative practice that can be achieved working across the boundaries of statutory services and private practice and provides an insight into the complexity of the needs of young people with brain injury in the community. This article will be of interest to practising case managers, and to social work care managers.

Journal

Social Care and NeurodisabilityEmerald Publishing

Published: Feb 17, 2012

Keywords: Collaborative practice; Brain injury; Social workers; Private case management; Personalisation agenda; Social care

References