Aviation Electronics

Aviation Electronics physical phenomena to be displayed and measured on an oscillograph, has recently been extended. The high overload low-pressure transducer Type G304 is an inductance type with provision for water cooling. Displacement of the diaphragm is restricted Details of Electrical and Electronic Apparatus with Applications in the by a stop which enables the transducer to withstand up to 1,000 lb./sq. in. The limit of diaphragm move­ Maintenance and Operation of Aircraft, Missiles and Space Vehicles ment, and hence maximum output, is attained at a much lower pressure. This transducer is available with any range between 0-10 and 0-100 lb./sq. in. Cooling Units Airfield Control Radar and it is ideally suited to applications requiring the A line of airborne cooling units, modified for use in Baginton, the municipal airport of Coventry, has measurement of low pressures in a system subjected ground support equipment, is now being marketed by been equipped with Decca Type 424 Airfield Control to high shock pressures. The latter have no effect on the Lcar-Romec Division of Lear Inc., International Radar. The installation of this all-weather landing aid the range or zero settings. Headquarters, 19 rue du Rhone, Geneva, Switzerland. is in anticipation of considerably increased traffic this The pressure transducer Type G302 is an inductance High-energy electronic equipment requires con­ summer and to meet B.E.A. requirements when type with a flush diaphragm. This eliminates the dead trolled heat dispersal for efficient and safe operation. Coventry is used as an alternative for scheduled volume and passage frequency problem which are With the increased complexity of aero-spacecraft services. associated with a transducer having a retracted ground support equipment, size and weight require­ Simplicity of operation and maintenance, coupled diaphragm, and allows mounting without modifica­ ments have become an important factor in cooling with good all-round operational performance, make tion of the volume of the medium under test. It can systems for ground based equipment. To meet these the Type 424 radar particularly suitable as a landing be supplied with any range between 0-10 and 0-10,000 market requirements, compact, light weight, airborne aid for airports like Coventry where the amount of lb./sq. in. Linearity and hysteresis are better than cooling units, like that produced by Lear for the traffic, while not justifying the installation of costly ± 1 percent of full range. An overload of 100 percent Eagle Missile, will be developed for other than air­ ground controlled approach equipment, nevertheless will not damag: the transducer and it will operate at borne application. calls for a simple and reliable radar aid to monitor approaching aircraft and provide final approach data for landings in adverse condition. The Decca 424 is a 3 cm. radar system of 20 kW peak power. The 14 ft. aerial is continuously rotated at 24 r.p.m. and may be installed on the airfield re­ mote from the remainder of the equipment which is normally fitted in the control tower. Dual transmitters are housed in the aerial pedestal, remotely switchable from the operator's position. Display and receiver equipment are also fully duplicated to provide instantaneous standby facilities. The polarization of the transmissions can be varied from the operator's position from linear to circular to overcome the effects of rain or snow returns. The horizontal beamwidth of 0·75 deg. and the short pulse length of 0·1 microseconds provide the high discrimination necessary for final approach con­ trol. Control is exercised from a P.P.I. type display, providing azimuth information only. Aircraft fly a The Eagle Missile cooling unit is designed for cool­ simulated glide path, adjusting height in accordance up to 150 dcg. C. without cooling. It has a high fre­ ing the missile's guidance system Klystron amplifiers. with the controllers instructions and the aircraft's dis­ quency response and can be calibrated statically. This small Lear unit has a nominal heat dissipation tance from touchdown as shown by radar. The P.P.I. rate of 9,375 watts. Other Lear-Romcc airborne The torsional vibration pick-up Type G218 has displays are fitted with engraved reflexion plotters been improved and is now known as the Type G318. liquid-to-air heat transfer systems, which are being showing the approach pattern and permitting aircraft There are no slip rings or moving contacts in this developed for ground support equipment applica­ to be tracked very accurately without parallax error. inductance type transducer. The new version is more tions, have cooling capacities of from 100 to 10,000 All-round coverage is obtained and the equipment is watts with operating temperatures in the minus 65 dcg. suitable for high speeds and offers greater dependa­ available for use with any runway at all times. A useful to plus 250 dcg. range. bility under conditions of 'run-out' and non-axiality. measure of circuit and approach surveillance is pro­ The output is directly proportional to angular move­ vided in addition to final approach control. ment in the range ± 4 deg. It can be calibrated under Electrical Equipment The equipment is produced by Decca Radar Ltd., static conditions in the test position using the jig Albert Embankment, London, S.E.1.1. In most of the new and projected aircraft it is pro­ provided. posed to use alternating current at 200 volts, 400 c/s. The pressure transducer Type G319 is a capacitance for the main power supply. For this reason the prin­ Automation in Air Traffic Control type capable of operating at up to 500 deg. C. without cipal activity of the Associated Electrical Industries The Ministry of Aviation is engaged in considering cooling. Ltd., Aircraft Equipment Group, during 1960 was how automation techniques can best be applied to the These transducers are available from Southern the extension of its ranges of aircraft products. Altern­ problems posed in air traffic control. The primary Instruments Ltd., Frimley Road, Cambcrley, Surrey. ating-current power supplies were first introduced in aims of the current studies are to increase efficiency, aircraft to operate airborne radar and gyroscopic type reduce the workload on controllers and increase the flying instruments. To meet the demands of this type capacity of the air traffic control systems. Two prin­ of equipment a range of small 400-c/s. motors has BRITISH STANDARDS cipal approaches are being made to cover different been developed, and now this range has been extended facets of the problem. The project on which the Copies of the following Standards may be obtained to include power ratings up to 12 h.p. continuous and greatest amount of work has been done so far con­ from the BRITISH STANDARDS INSTITUTION, 25 h.p. peak. cerns the compilation and manipulation of prc-flight 2 Park Street, London, W.1, at the price stated: The introduction of a.c. power, however, has had its and in-flight data over the North Atlantic. Experi­ most pronounced effect in the range of control gear ments will be centred round the Apollo Digital New Aircraft Standards required. The comparatively small-output machines Computer, manufactured by Ferranti, Ltd., Hollin- B.S. L 80:1961—Aluminium-2¼ per cent magnesium previously used were protected by fuses, but with the wood, Lanes., and due to be installed in the Scottish alloy sheets and strips (soft). 2s. 6d. introduction of alternating current as a main power Air Traffic Control Centre this summer. It is hoped to B.S. L 81:1961—Aluminium-2¼ per cent magnesium supply a complete range of a.c. contactors, circuit- learn a great deal from this series of experiments on alloy sheets and strips (half hard). 2s. 6d. breakers, control, and other protection devices has the way to harness this sort of equipment to the real B.S. L 82:1961—Aluminium-3½ per cent magnesium been developed. The range covers all ratings up to time problems of air traffic control. While the experi­ alloy sheets and strips (soft). 2s. 6d. 100 amp. per line. Of particular interest is the new ments are associated principally with the Atlantic, it B.S. L 83:1961—Aluminium-copper-nickel-magnes- small push-button operated, three-phase thermal is expected that the results will prove valuable for ium-iron-silicon alloy forging stock, bars extruded overload circuit-breaker, type LGC, which is the first application in other areas. sections and forgings (solution treated and aged at of its type to be developed for aircraft use. The second major project concerns experimentation room temperature). 2s. 6d. Another new development is the range of small in the design of the Air Traffic Control Centres of the B.S. L 84:1961—Aluminium-copper-silicon-magnes­ toggle switches, suitable for use in either d.c. or a.c. future. This work will be carried out at the Ministry ium alloy bars and extruded sections (solution circuits. These small switches can be supplied with of Aviation's Air Traffic Control Experimental Unit treated and aged at room temperature). 2s. 6d. single-, double-, triple- or four-pole configurations. and will make use of equipment which will be made B.S. L 85:1961—Aluminium-copper-silicon-magnes- They can be arranged to give a variety of switching by Elliott Brothers (London), Ltd., under a contract ium alloy forging stock, bars, extruded sections operations, and can be spring-biased in any particular announced recently. It will be centred on their 502 and forgings (solution treated and precipitation position, or fitted with a special gate mechanism so Computer, plus a considerable amount of experi­ treated). 2s. 6d. arranged that it will lock the switch in any desired mental display equipment. The experimental system position to prevent inadvertent operation. They can will be designed to accept and distribute simulated or Revised Aircraft Standards also be supplied with a miniature light bulb in the live data and to carry out the necessary calculations operating handle with arrangements made for the B.S. 4 L 16:1961— 99 per cent aluminium shcets(half and operate electronic or electro-mechanical indi­ bulb to light up in a predetermined position, as a hard). 2s. 6d. cators. warning or other form of indication. All these toggle B.S. 4 L 17:1961—99 per cent aluminium sheets switches have been designed to meet the onerous con­ (soft). 2s. 6d. Transducers ditions experienced in aircraft, and they incorporate a B.S. 6 L 25: 1961—Aluminium-copper-nickcl-mag- wide double-break action, and are sealed against the The range of transducers available for use with the ncsium alloy forging stock and forgings (solution ngress of moisture. Southern F. M. System, which enables transient treated and aged). 2s. 6d. 120 Aircraft Engineeri?ig http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

Aviation Electronics

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, Volume 33 (4): 1 – Apr 1, 1961

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb033404
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

physical phenomena to be displayed and measured on an oscillograph, has recently been extended. The high overload low-pressure transducer Type G304 is an inductance type with provision for water cooling. Displacement of the diaphragm is restricted Details of Electrical and Electronic Apparatus with Applications in the by a stop which enables the transducer to withstand up to 1,000 lb./sq. in. The limit of diaphragm move­ Maintenance and Operation of Aircraft, Missiles and Space Vehicles ment, and hence maximum output, is attained at a much lower pressure. This transducer is available with any range between 0-10 and 0-100 lb./sq. in. Cooling Units Airfield Control Radar and it is ideally suited to applications requiring the A line of airborne cooling units, modified for use in Baginton, the municipal airport of Coventry, has measurement of low pressures in a system subjected ground support equipment, is now being marketed by been equipped with Decca Type 424 Airfield Control to high shock pressures. The latter have no effect on the Lcar-Romec Division of Lear Inc., International Radar. The installation of this all-weather landing aid the range or zero settings. Headquarters, 19 rue du Rhone, Geneva, Switzerland. is in anticipation of considerably increased traffic this The pressure transducer Type G302 is an inductance High-energy electronic equipment requires con­ summer and to meet B.E.A. requirements when type with a flush diaphragm. This eliminates the dead trolled heat dispersal for efficient and safe operation. Coventry is used as an alternative for scheduled volume and passage frequency problem which are With the increased complexity of aero-spacecraft services. associated with a transducer having a retracted ground support equipment, size and weight require­ Simplicity of operation and maintenance, coupled diaphragm, and allows mounting without modifica­ ments have become an important factor in cooling with good all-round operational performance, make tion of the volume of the medium under test. It can systems for ground based equipment. To meet these the Type 424 radar particularly suitable as a landing be supplied with any range between 0-10 and 0-10,000 market requirements, compact, light weight, airborne aid for airports like Coventry where the amount of lb./sq. in. Linearity and hysteresis are better than cooling units, like that produced by Lear for the traffic, while not justifying the installation of costly ± 1 percent of full range. An overload of 100 percent Eagle Missile, will be developed for other than air­ ground controlled approach equipment, nevertheless will not damag: the transducer and it will operate at borne application. calls for a simple and reliable radar aid to monitor approaching aircraft and provide final approach data for landings in adverse condition. The Decca 424 is a 3 cm. radar system of 20 kW peak power. The 14 ft. aerial is continuously rotated at 24 r.p.m. and may be installed on the airfield re­ mote from the remainder of the equipment which is normally fitted in the control tower. Dual transmitters are housed in the aerial pedestal, remotely switchable from the operator's position. Display and receiver equipment are also fully duplicated to provide instantaneous standby facilities. The polarization of the transmissions can be varied from the operator's position from linear to circular to overcome the effects of rain or snow returns. The horizontal beamwidth of 0·75 deg. and the short pulse length of 0·1 microseconds provide the high discrimination necessary for final approach con­ trol. Control is exercised from a P.P.I. type display, providing azimuth information only. Aircraft fly a The Eagle Missile cooling unit is designed for cool­ simulated glide path, adjusting height in accordance up to 150 dcg. C. without cooling. It has a high fre­ ing the missile's guidance system Klystron amplifiers. with the controllers instructions and the aircraft's dis­ quency response and can be calibrated statically. This small Lear unit has a nominal heat dissipation tance from touchdown as shown by radar. The P.P.I. rate of 9,375 watts. Other Lear-Romcc airborne The torsional vibration pick-up Type G218 has displays are fitted with engraved reflexion plotters been improved and is now known as the Type G318. liquid-to-air heat transfer systems, which are being showing the approach pattern and permitting aircraft There are no slip rings or moving contacts in this developed for ground support equipment applica­ to be tracked very accurately without parallax error. inductance type transducer. The new version is more tions, have cooling capacities of from 100 to 10,000 All-round coverage is obtained and the equipment is watts with operating temperatures in the minus 65 dcg. suitable for high speeds and offers greater dependa­ available for use with any runway at all times. A useful to plus 250 dcg. range. bility under conditions of 'run-out' and non-axiality. measure of circuit and approach surveillance is pro­ The output is directly proportional to angular move­ vided in addition to final approach control. ment in the range ± 4 deg. It can be calibrated under Electrical Equipment The equipment is produced by Decca Radar Ltd., static conditions in the test position using the jig Albert Embankment, London, S.E.1.1. In most of the new and projected aircraft it is pro­ provided. posed to use alternating current at 200 volts, 400 c/s. The pressure transducer Type G319 is a capacitance for the main power supply. For this reason the prin­ Automation in Air Traffic Control type capable of operating at up to 500 deg. C. without cipal activity of the Associated Electrical Industries The Ministry of Aviation is engaged in considering cooling. Ltd., Aircraft Equipment Group, during 1960 was how automation techniques can best be applied to the These transducers are available from Southern the extension of its ranges of aircraft products. Altern­ problems posed in air traffic control. The primary Instruments Ltd., Frimley Road, Cambcrley, Surrey. ating-current power supplies were first introduced in aims of the current studies are to increase efficiency, aircraft to operate airborne radar and gyroscopic type reduce the workload on controllers and increase the flying instruments. To meet the demands of this type capacity of the air traffic control systems. Two prin­ of equipment a range of small 400-c/s. motors has BRITISH STANDARDS cipal approaches are being made to cover different been developed, and now this range has been extended facets of the problem. The project on which the Copies of the following Standards may be obtained to include power ratings up to 12 h.p. continuous and greatest amount of work has been done so far con­ from the BRITISH STANDARDS INSTITUTION, 25 h.p. peak. cerns the compilation and manipulation of prc-flight 2 Park Street, London, W.1, at the price stated: The introduction of a.c. power, however, has had its and in-flight data over the North Atlantic. Experi­ most pronounced effect in the range of control gear ments will be centred round the Apollo Digital New Aircraft Standards required. The comparatively small-output machines Computer, manufactured by Ferranti, Ltd., Hollin- B.S. L 80:1961—Aluminium-2¼ per cent magnesium previously used were protected by fuses, but with the wood, Lanes., and due to be installed in the Scottish alloy sheets and strips (soft). 2s. 6d. introduction of alternating current as a main power Air Traffic Control Centre this summer. It is hoped to B.S. L 81:1961—Aluminium-2¼ per cent magnesium supply a complete range of a.c. contactors, circuit- learn a great deal from this series of experiments on alloy sheets and strips (half hard). 2s. 6d. breakers, control, and other protection devices has the way to harness this sort of equipment to the real B.S. L 82:1961—Aluminium-3½ per cent magnesium been developed. The range covers all ratings up to time problems of air traffic control. While the experi­ alloy sheets and strips (soft). 2s. 6d. 100 amp. per line. Of particular interest is the new ments are associated principally with the Atlantic, it B.S. L 83:1961—Aluminium-copper-nickel-magnes- small push-button operated, three-phase thermal is expected that the results will prove valuable for ium-iron-silicon alloy forging stock, bars extruded overload circuit-breaker, type LGC, which is the first application in other areas. sections and forgings (solution treated and aged at of its type to be developed for aircraft use. The second major project concerns experimentation room temperature). 2s. 6d. Another new development is the range of small in the design of the Air Traffic Control Centres of the B.S. L 84:1961—Aluminium-copper-silicon-magnes­ toggle switches, suitable for use in either d.c. or a.c. future. This work will be carried out at the Ministry ium alloy bars and extruded sections (solution circuits. These small switches can be supplied with of Aviation's Air Traffic Control Experimental Unit treated and aged at room temperature). 2s. 6d. single-, double-, triple- or four-pole configurations. and will make use of equipment which will be made B.S. L 85:1961—Aluminium-copper-silicon-magnes- They can be arranged to give a variety of switching by Elliott Brothers (London), Ltd., under a contract ium alloy forging stock, bars, extruded sections operations, and can be spring-biased in any particular announced recently. It will be centred on their 502 and forgings (solution treated and precipitation position, or fitted with a special gate mechanism so Computer, plus a considerable amount of experi­ treated). 2s. 6d. arranged that it will lock the switch in any desired mental display equipment. The experimental system position to prevent inadvertent operation. They can will be designed to accept and distribute simulated or Revised Aircraft Standards also be supplied with a miniature light bulb in the live data and to carry out the necessary calculations operating handle with arrangements made for the B.S. 4 L 16:1961— 99 per cent aluminium shcets(half and operate electronic or electro-mechanical indi­ bulb to light up in a predetermined position, as a hard). 2s. 6d. cators. warning or other form of indication. All these toggle B.S. 4 L 17:1961—99 per cent aluminium sheets switches have been designed to meet the onerous con­ (soft). 2s. 6d. Transducers ditions experienced in aircraft, and they incorporate a B.S. 6 L 25: 1961—Aluminium-copper-nickcl-mag- wide double-break action, and are sealed against the The range of transducers available for use with the ncsium alloy forging stock and forgings (solution ngress of moisture. Southern F. M. System, which enables transient treated and aged). 2s. 6d. 120 Aircraft Engineeri?ig

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Apr 1, 1961

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