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AUTOMATION AND NONPROFESSIONAL STAFF THE NEGLECTED MAJORITY

AUTOMATION AND NONPROFESSIONAL STAFF THE NEGLECTED MAJORITY Using data drawn from interviews with staff at South BankPolytechnic in 1985, the attitude of nonprofessional staff toautomation, the ways in which they can prepare for such a move, and theeffect of automation on job satisfaction are all considered. Theprospect of automation is disturbing to nonprofessional staffreassurance needs to be given by a systems librarian who isinterpersonally as well as technically skilful. Automation training mustemphasise jobs and purposes rather than technology and hardware itshould allow for different learning styles, be conducted informally insmall groups, and include handson experience. Automation will succeedbest where participative management is practised, but no single approachto automation will work in every environment the managers job is tofind the best fit between the organisation and the styleof automation adopted. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Library Management Emerald Publishing

AUTOMATION AND NONPROFESSIONAL STAFF THE NEGLECTED MAJORITY

Library Management , Volume 12 (3): 9 – Mar 1, 1991

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0143-5124
DOI
10.1108/01435129110140701
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Using data drawn from interviews with staff at South BankPolytechnic in 1985, the attitude of nonprofessional staff toautomation, the ways in which they can prepare for such a move, and theeffect of automation on job satisfaction are all considered. Theprospect of automation is disturbing to nonprofessional staffreassurance needs to be given by a systems librarian who isinterpersonally as well as technically skilful. Automation training mustemphasise jobs and purposes rather than technology and hardware itshould allow for different learning styles, be conducted informally insmall groups, and include handson experience. Automation will succeedbest where participative management is practised, but no single approachto automation will work in every environment the managers job is tofind the best fit between the organisation and the styleof automation adopted.

Journal

Library ManagementEmerald Publishing

Published: Mar 1, 1991

There are no references for this article.