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Automatic Riveting in Aeroplane Construction

Automatic Riveting in Aeroplane Construction THE heathardened, socalled strong, aluminium alloys such as Avional and Duralumin, require a special technique in making joints. In the common aircraft steels permanent joints are usually made by welding, but this method is only applicable to hardened aluminium alloys to a limited extent, since the unavoidable heating of the joint may destroy the strength of the materialwhether produced by annealing at 500 deg., quenching in cold water, and subsequent ageing at room temperature, or by artificial ageing at a temperature of about 150 deg. for several hours. Such loss of strength being usually undesirable, riveting must in the majority of cases be substituted for welding although in recent practice spot welding has come into use, particularly for thin material up to about 15 mm. In that case, the heating is only quite local and of short duration, and the resulting loss of strength inconsiderable. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

Automatic Riveting in Aeroplane Construction

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb030866
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

THE heathardened, socalled strong, aluminium alloys such as Avional and Duralumin, require a special technique in making joints. In the common aircraft steels permanent joints are usually made by welding, but this method is only applicable to hardened aluminium alloys to a limited extent, since the unavoidable heating of the joint may destroy the strength of the materialwhether produced by annealing at 500 deg., quenching in cold water, and subsequent ageing at room temperature, or by artificial ageing at a temperature of about 150 deg. for several hours. Such loss of strength being usually undesirable, riveting must in the majority of cases be substituted for welding although in recent practice spot welding has come into use, particularly for thin material up to about 15 mm. In that case, the heating is only quite local and of short duration, and the resulting loss of strength inconsiderable.

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 1942

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