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Autism spectrum disorder, bestiality and zoophilia: a systematic PRISMA review

Autism spectrum disorder, bestiality and zoophilia: a systematic PRISMA review There remains a lack of knowledge surrounding paraphilic or deviant arousal sexual behaviours in individuals with Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) (Kellaher, 2015). The purpose of this paper is to explore the literature for any empirical study, case study or discussion/review paper surrounding individuals with ASD and zoophilia or bestiality.Design/methodology/approachA systematic PRISMA review was conducted.FindingsThis systematic review highlighted only a small number of papers, which have looked at zoophilia or bestiality in individuals with ASD. Only one article was identified as being relevant in the present review, three further articles included a description of a case involving someone with ASD who engaged in zoophilia or bestiality and another paper, although not the focus of the study, found one person with Asperger’s disorder who had several paraphilias including olfactophilia, podophilia and zoophilia in a sample of 20 institutionalised, male adolescents and young adults with Autistic disorder and borderline/mild mental retardation. All the case studies clearly highlight some of the ASD symptomology that can contribute to engaging in bestiality or zoophilia.Practical implicationsIt is important that individuals with ASD have access to appropriate and timely sex education and that parents are supported by healthcare professionals to engage with their children with ASD in such interactions across the autism spectrum irrespective of the parent’s expectations.Originality/valueTo the author’s knowledge, this is the first review of ASD in relation to bestiality and zoophilia. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour Emerald Publishing

Autism spectrum disorder, bestiality and zoophilia: a systematic PRISMA review

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
© Emerald Publishing Limited
ISSN
2050-8824
DOI
10.1108/jidob-06-2019-0012
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

There remains a lack of knowledge surrounding paraphilic or deviant arousal sexual behaviours in individuals with Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) (Kellaher, 2015). The purpose of this paper is to explore the literature for any empirical study, case study or discussion/review paper surrounding individuals with ASD and zoophilia or bestiality.Design/methodology/approachA systematic PRISMA review was conducted.FindingsThis systematic review highlighted only a small number of papers, which have looked at zoophilia or bestiality in individuals with ASD. Only one article was identified as being relevant in the present review, three further articles included a description of a case involving someone with ASD who engaged in zoophilia or bestiality and another paper, although not the focus of the study, found one person with Asperger’s disorder who had several paraphilias including olfactophilia, podophilia and zoophilia in a sample of 20 institutionalised, male adolescents and young adults with Autistic disorder and borderline/mild mental retardation. All the case studies clearly highlight some of the ASD symptomology that can contribute to engaging in bestiality or zoophilia.Practical implicationsIt is important that individuals with ASD have access to appropriate and timely sex education and that parents are supported by healthcare professionals to engage with their children with ASD in such interactions across the autism spectrum irrespective of the parent’s expectations.Originality/valueTo the author’s knowledge, this is the first review of ASD in relation to bestiality and zoophilia.

Journal

Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending BehaviourEmerald Publishing

Published: Apr 30, 2020

Keywords: Autism spectrum disorders; ASD; Asperger’s syndrome; Bestiality; Zoophilia; Zoosexual behaviour; Zoophilism; Zooerasty; Zooerastia; Bestiosexuality

References