Attitudinal outcomes of boundary permeability A comparison of Australian and Singaporean employees

Attitudinal outcomes of boundary permeability A comparison of Australian and Singaporean employees Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to examine the moderating role of culture in the relationship between boundary permeability and cooperation and work group identification. In addition, the levels of boundary permeability of Australians and Singaporeans are compared. Design/methodology/approach – Survey questionnaires were administered to 134 employees (87 Singaporeans and 47 Australians) working in multinational corporations in both Australia and Singapore. Hierarchical moderated regression was used to test whether culture moderated the relationship between boundary permeability and cooperation and workgroup identification. Findings – Results indicated that workplace boundary permeability was marginally and positively related to cooperation but not to workgroup identification. Further analysis revealed that culture moderated the relationships between workplace boundary permeability and cooperation and workgroup identification. Specifically, a stronger positive relationship was found between boundary permeability and these outcomes for Singaporeans as opposed to Australians. Research limitations/implications – Limitations include the relatively small sample size of both cultural groups; the behavioral measure used to assess cooperation; and the self‐reported nature of the data. Practical implications – The findings of this study have important practical implications for managers working in multinational corporations who seek to promote cooperation and workgroup identification among culturally diverse employees. Originality/value – Guided by social identity and cross‐cultural theories, this study highlights the role of culture in predicting the attitudinal consequences of boundary permeability. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal Emerald Publishing

Attitudinal outcomes of boundary permeability A comparison of Australian and Singaporean employees

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2010 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1352-7606
DOI
10.1108/13527601021038697
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to examine the moderating role of culture in the relationship between boundary permeability and cooperation and work group identification. In addition, the levels of boundary permeability of Australians and Singaporeans are compared. Design/methodology/approach – Survey questionnaires were administered to 134 employees (87 Singaporeans and 47 Australians) working in multinational corporations in both Australia and Singapore. Hierarchical moderated regression was used to test whether culture moderated the relationship between boundary permeability and cooperation and workgroup identification. Findings – Results indicated that workplace boundary permeability was marginally and positively related to cooperation but not to workgroup identification. Further analysis revealed that culture moderated the relationships between workplace boundary permeability and cooperation and workgroup identification. Specifically, a stronger positive relationship was found between boundary permeability and these outcomes for Singaporeans as opposed to Australians. Research limitations/implications – Limitations include the relatively small sample size of both cultural groups; the behavioral measure used to assess cooperation; and the self‐reported nature of the data. Practical implications – The findings of this study have important practical implications for managers working in multinational corporations who seek to promote cooperation and workgroup identification among culturally diverse employees. Originality/value – Guided by social identity and cross‐cultural theories, this study highlights the role of culture in predicting the attitudinal consequences of boundary permeability.

Journal

Cross Cultural Management: An International JournalEmerald Publishing

Published: May 4, 2010

Keywords: Australia; Singapore; Employee behaviour; Multinational companies; Cross‐cultural studies

References

  • Cross cultural social and organizational psychology
    Bond, M.H.; Smith, P.B.
  • Social identification effects in social dilemmas: a transformation of motives
    De Cremer, D.; van Vugt, M.
  • Social identification and permeability of group boundaries
    Ellemers, N.; van Knippenberg, A.; De Vries, N.; Wilke, H.
  • Assessing alternative models of individualism and collectivism: a confirmatory factor analysis
    Freeman, M.A.; Bordia, P.
  • The nature of workplace boundaries between Australians and Singaporeans in multinational organizations: a qualitative inquiry
    Loh, M.I.; Restubog, S.L.D.; Gallois, C.
  • Cooperation and Competition among Primitive People
    Mead, M.
  • Successful international cooperation: the influence of cultural similarity, strategic differences, and international experience
    Van Oudenhoven, J.P.; van der Zee, K.I.
  • Mentors, supervisors, and role models: do they reduce the effects of psychological contract breach?
    Zagenczyk, T.J.; Gibney, R.; Kiewitz, C.; Restubog, S.L.D.

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