Astrophysicists on Twitter An in‐depth analysis of tweeting and scientific publication behavior

Astrophysicists on Twitter An in‐depth analysis of tweeting and scientific publication behavior Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to analyze the tweeting behavior of 37 astrophysicists on Twitter and compares their tweeting behavior with their publication behavior and citation impact to show whether they tweet research‐related topics or not. Design/methodology/approach – Astrophysicists on Twitter are selected to compare their tweets with their publications from Web of Science. Different user groups are identified based on tweeting and publication frequency. Findings – A moderate negative correlation ( ρ =−0.339) is found between the number of publications and tweets per day, while retweet and citation rates do not correlate. The similarity between tweets and abstracts is very low (cos=0.081). User groups show different tweeting behavior such as retweeting and including hashtags, usernames and URLs. Research limitations/implications – The study is limited in terms of the small set of astrophysicists. Results are not necessarily representative of the entire astrophysicist community on Twitter and they most certainly do not apply to scientists in general. Future research should apply the methods to a larger set of researchers and other scientific disciplines. Practical implications – To a certain extent, this study helps to understand how researchers use Twitter. The results hint at the fact that impact on Twitter can neither be equated with nor replace traditional research impact metrics. However, tweets and other so‐called altmetrics might be able to reflect other impact of scientists such as public outreach and science communication. Originality/value – To the best of the knowledge, this is the first in‐depth study comparing researchers’ tweeting activity and behavior with scientific publication output in terms of quantity, content and impact. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aslib Journal of Information Management Emerald Publishing

Astrophysicists on Twitter An in‐depth analysis of tweeting and scientific publication behavior

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
2050-3806
D.O.I.
10.1108/AJIM-09-2013-0081
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to analyze the tweeting behavior of 37 astrophysicists on Twitter and compares their tweeting behavior with their publication behavior and citation impact to show whether they tweet research‐related topics or not. Design/methodology/approach – Astrophysicists on Twitter are selected to compare their tweets with their publications from Web of Science. Different user groups are identified based on tweeting and publication frequency. Findings – A moderate negative correlation ( ρ =−0.339) is found between the number of publications and tweets per day, while retweet and citation rates do not correlate. The similarity between tweets and abstracts is very low (cos=0.081). User groups show different tweeting behavior such as retweeting and including hashtags, usernames and URLs. Research limitations/implications – The study is limited in terms of the small set of astrophysicists. Results are not necessarily representative of the entire astrophysicist community on Twitter and they most certainly do not apply to scientists in general. Future research should apply the methods to a larger set of researchers and other scientific disciplines. Practical implications – To a certain extent, this study helps to understand how researchers use Twitter. The results hint at the fact that impact on Twitter can neither be equated with nor replace traditional research impact metrics. However, tweets and other so‐called altmetrics might be able to reflect other impact of scientists such as public outreach and science communication. Originality/value – To the best of the knowledge, this is the first in‐depth study comparing researchers’ tweeting activity and behavior with scientific publication output in terms of quantity, content and impact.

Journal

Aslib Journal of Information ManagementEmerald Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 2014

Keywords: Social media; Twitter; Bibliometrics; Citation analysis; Altmetrics; Micro‐blogging

References

  • Tweet, tweet, retweet: conversational aspects of retweeting on twitter
    Boyd, D.; Golder, S.; Lotan, G.
  • Social media use in the research workflow
    Rowlands, I.; Nicholas, D.; Russell, B.; Canty, N.; Watkinson, A.

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