Association of serum retinol and circulating inflammatory cells with disease activity in ulcerative colitis patients

Association of serum retinol and circulating inflammatory cells with disease activity in... PurposeThe purpose of this study is to explore the association of serum retinol and number of circulating inflammatory cells and disease activity in patients with ulcerative colitis.Design/methodology/approachA total of 60 patients with ulcerative colitis were enrolled in a cross-sectional pilot study. Patients were recruited from specialized clinic of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Iran between April and August 2015. Mayo clinic index was used to assess clinical disease activity score. Blood samples were collected. Serum retinol was assessed using HPLC to determine vitamin A status. Complete blood count and lymphocyte phenotyping were performed by automated hematology analyzer and flow-cytometric analysis, respectively.FindingsAccording to Mayo scoring, 68.33 per cent of patients had mild and 31.66 per cent had moderate or severe disease activity. About 43.33 per cent of patients were vitamin A deficient, with 23.33 per cent having moderate to severe deficiency (serum retinol < 20 µg/dl). Lower levels of serum retinol and higher count and percentages of CD3+, CD8+ T cells and neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio were statistically associated with disease activity according to univariate analysis (p = 0.002, 0.037, <0.001, 0.031, 0.002 and 0.039); however, in binary logistic regression, only lower levels of serum retinol were independently associated with disease activity with a OR of 0.564 (p = 0.021; 95 per cent CI 0.35-0.92).Originality/valueVitamin A deficiency was detected in this study population. Patients with moderate to severe disease activity demonstrated lower serum retinol, higher CD8+ T cells and neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio compared to patients with mild disease activity. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nutrition & Food Science Emerald Publishing

Association of serum retinol and circulating inflammatory cells with disease activity in ulcerative colitis patients

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0034-6659
DOI
10.1108/NFS-05-2018-0131
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

PurposeThe purpose of this study is to explore the association of serum retinol and number of circulating inflammatory cells and disease activity in patients with ulcerative colitis.Design/methodology/approachA total of 60 patients with ulcerative colitis were enrolled in a cross-sectional pilot study. Patients were recruited from specialized clinic of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Iran between April and August 2015. Mayo clinic index was used to assess clinical disease activity score. Blood samples were collected. Serum retinol was assessed using HPLC to determine vitamin A status. Complete blood count and lymphocyte phenotyping were performed by automated hematology analyzer and flow-cytometric analysis, respectively.FindingsAccording to Mayo scoring, 68.33 per cent of patients had mild and 31.66 per cent had moderate or severe disease activity. About 43.33 per cent of patients were vitamin A deficient, with 23.33 per cent having moderate to severe deficiency (serum retinol < 20 µg/dl). Lower levels of serum retinol and higher count and percentages of CD3+, CD8+ T cells and neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio were statistically associated with disease activity according to univariate analysis (p = 0.002, 0.037, <0.001, 0.031, 0.002 and 0.039); however, in binary logistic regression, only lower levels of serum retinol were independently associated with disease activity with a OR of 0.564 (p = 0.021; 95 per cent CI 0.35-0.92).Originality/valueVitamin A deficiency was detected in this study population. Patients with moderate to severe disease activity demonstrated lower serum retinol, higher CD8+ T cells and neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio compared to patients with mild disease activity.

Journal

Nutrition & Food ScienceEmerald Publishing

Published: Mar 11, 2019

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