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Assessment of patient safety culture: a comparative case study between physicians and nurses

Assessment of patient safety culture: a comparative case study between physicians and nurses PurposeThis study compares responses of physicians and nurses to patient safety culture assessment in the Security Forces Hospital Program Makkah, Saudi Arabia, using the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) survey tool and its referenced benchmarking tool. The purpose of this paper is to measure patient safety culture to improve its perception, reaction, and implementation, leading to improvement in care delivery.Design/methodology/approachThis study uses convenience sampling, delivering paper copies. The completed surveys were collected by a designated hospital contact person in QPSD. The total population surveyed was 623: 336 nurses, 174 physicians, 9 pharmacists, and 104 technicians.FindingsComposite-level results compared to AHRQ database hospitals show values below minimum positive in “Staffing” and “Non-Punitive response to error” to have decreased values in nursing answers than physician ones. The average percentage positive concerning “staffing” items is below the average percentage positive of database hospitals; in nursing, it decreases more; it shows a low positive response regarding enough staff, work hours, and crisis mode; the last item shows a more negative response. The average percentage positive concerning “No punitive Response to Error” is below average positive of database hospitals; in nursing, it decreases more, with a low positive response concerning feeling responsible for mistakes.Originality/valueThe approach explained in this paper aims to measure patient safety culture, which can be improved through mentioned recommendations. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Business Process Management Journal Emerald Publishing

Assessment of patient safety culture: a comparative case study between physicians and nurses

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
1463-7154
DOI
10.1108/BPMJ-02-2017-0029
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

PurposeThis study compares responses of physicians and nurses to patient safety culture assessment in the Security Forces Hospital Program Makkah, Saudi Arabia, using the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) survey tool and its referenced benchmarking tool. The purpose of this paper is to measure patient safety culture to improve its perception, reaction, and implementation, leading to improvement in care delivery.Design/methodology/approachThis study uses convenience sampling, delivering paper copies. The completed surveys were collected by a designated hospital contact person in QPSD. The total population surveyed was 623: 336 nurses, 174 physicians, 9 pharmacists, and 104 technicians.FindingsComposite-level results compared to AHRQ database hospitals show values below minimum positive in “Staffing” and “Non-Punitive response to error” to have decreased values in nursing answers than physician ones. The average percentage positive concerning “staffing” items is below the average percentage positive of database hospitals; in nursing, it decreases more; it shows a low positive response regarding enough staff, work hours, and crisis mode; the last item shows a more negative response. The average percentage positive concerning “No punitive Response to Error” is below average positive of database hospitals; in nursing, it decreases more, with a low positive response concerning feeling responsible for mistakes.Originality/valueThe approach explained in this paper aims to measure patient safety culture, which can be improved through mentioned recommendations.

Journal

Business Process Management JournalEmerald Publishing

Published: Jul 3, 2017

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