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Assessing burnout in diversity and inclusion professionals

Assessing burnout in diversity and inclusion professionals Burnout has been linked to a myriad of negative organizational and individual health outcomes which threaten employee and organizational well-being. This study examines how unique features of diversity and inclusion (D&I) work are related to burnout.Design/methodology/approachParticipants were recruited using network and convenience sampling strategies. A total of 64 full-time employees whose primary responsibility is to implement the D&I strategy for their organization provided useable data for analysis. Participants completed measures of burnout, role ambiguity, role conflict, subjective experiences of tokenism, and top management support. Measures were administered online via Qualtrics.FindingsResults suggest lack of clear job duties, conflicting job demands, lack of top management support, and experiences of tokenism are associated with D&I professionals' experiences of burnout. The current study, however, indicates that while D&I professional experience higher levels of exhaustion than other professionals, they also experience greater professional efficacy, which suggests D&I roles are both challenging and rewarding.Practical implicationsResults suggest organizational leaders may mitigate employee burnout by providing clear support to and role definitions for D&I professionals.Originality/valueThis study is the first to explore burnout experiences among D&I professionals. Additionally, this study examines how burnout experiences are associated with role dysfunctions, top management support, and subjective experiences of tokenism. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Equality Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal Emerald Publishing

Assessing burnout in diversity and inclusion professionals

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References (41)

Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
© Emerald Publishing Limited
ISSN
2040-7149
DOI
10.1108/edi-12-2020-0360
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Burnout has been linked to a myriad of negative organizational and individual health outcomes which threaten employee and organizational well-being. This study examines how unique features of diversity and inclusion (D&I) work are related to burnout.Design/methodology/approachParticipants were recruited using network and convenience sampling strategies. A total of 64 full-time employees whose primary responsibility is to implement the D&I strategy for their organization provided useable data for analysis. Participants completed measures of burnout, role ambiguity, role conflict, subjective experiences of tokenism, and top management support. Measures were administered online via Qualtrics.FindingsResults suggest lack of clear job duties, conflicting job demands, lack of top management support, and experiences of tokenism are associated with D&I professionals' experiences of burnout. The current study, however, indicates that while D&I professional experience higher levels of exhaustion than other professionals, they also experience greater professional efficacy, which suggests D&I roles are both challenging and rewarding.Practical implicationsResults suggest organizational leaders may mitigate employee burnout by providing clear support to and role definitions for D&I professionals.Originality/valueThis study is the first to explore burnout experiences among D&I professionals. Additionally, this study examines how burnout experiences are associated with role dysfunctions, top management support, and subjective experiences of tokenism.

Journal

Equality Diversity and Inclusion: An International JournalEmerald Publishing

Published: Feb 3, 2023

Keywords: Occupational burnout; Diversity and inclusion professionals; Tokenism; Role conflict; Role ambiguity; Top management support

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