Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Assessing and measuring sales culture within commercial banks in Jordan

Assessing and measuring sales culture within commercial banks in Jordan Purpose – This study aims to assess and measure the sales culture within the commercial banks in Jordan, and to provide top management of these banks with the database which may be required for improving the banks' selling effectiveness. Design/methodology/approach – The study has been conducted on a convenience sample of 1,000 employees selected from those of all the commercial banks operating in Jordan. Sales culture was measured by using the Sales Culture Index (SCI), consisting of 65 statements. The data required for this study were collected by a self‐structured questionnaire. Findings – The findings of the study indicate that the overall employees' perception of sales culture in the surveyed banks is moderate. However, the sales culture in the non‐Jordanian banks was stronger than that in the Jordanian banks. Research limitations/implications – As is the case in any study, some limitations relevant to this study cannot be abandoned. For instance, the findings of this study are based on self‐report perceptions of both the employees and the customers. Data collected by this approach may or may not be accurate to that extent, which reflects the respondents' real feelings. Practical implications – The results of this study would enable management in the commercial banks in Jordan to design internal marketing programs aimed at building a strong service‐minded sales culture among employees. Originality/value – This is a first attempt to assess and measure the sales culture in the commercial banks in Jordan. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png EuroMed Journal of Business Emerald Publishing

Assessing and measuring sales culture within commercial banks in Jordan

EuroMed Journal of Business , Volume 6 (2): 26 – Jul 18, 2011

Loading next page...
 
/lp/emerald-publishing/assessing-and-measuring-sales-culture-within-commercial-banks-in-rjoXlHwxkt
Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2011 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1450-2194
DOI
10.1108/14502191111151287
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – This study aims to assess and measure the sales culture within the commercial banks in Jordan, and to provide top management of these banks with the database which may be required for improving the banks' selling effectiveness. Design/methodology/approach – The study has been conducted on a convenience sample of 1,000 employees selected from those of all the commercial banks operating in Jordan. Sales culture was measured by using the Sales Culture Index (SCI), consisting of 65 statements. The data required for this study were collected by a self‐structured questionnaire. Findings – The findings of the study indicate that the overall employees' perception of sales culture in the surveyed banks is moderate. However, the sales culture in the non‐Jordanian banks was stronger than that in the Jordanian banks. Research limitations/implications – As is the case in any study, some limitations relevant to this study cannot be abandoned. For instance, the findings of this study are based on self‐report perceptions of both the employees and the customers. Data collected by this approach may or may not be accurate to that extent, which reflects the respondents' real feelings. Practical implications – The results of this study would enable management in the commercial banks in Jordan to design internal marketing programs aimed at building a strong service‐minded sales culture among employees. Originality/value – This is a first attempt to assess and measure the sales culture in the commercial banks in Jordan.

Journal

EuroMed Journal of BusinessEmerald Publishing

Published: Jul 18, 2011

Keywords: Assessment; Banks; Sales culture; Employees; Perception; Selling methods; Advertising effectiveness; Jordan

References