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Antecedents of front‐line managers' perceptions of HR role stressors

Antecedents of front‐line managers' perceptions of HR role stressors Purpose – Based on role theory, this paper seeks to investigate the impact of HR devolution characteristics (number of devolved HR tasks), characteristics of the HR devolution context (level of support from the HR department, and presence of institutionalised incentives to perform the allotted HR tasks well), and personal characteristics of the front‐line managers (HR competency) on front‐line managers' perceptions of two HR role stressors, i.e. HR role ambiguity and HR role overload. Design/methodology/approach – The paper uses a sample of 169 front‐line managers from 47 organisations. The results are based on two moderation regression analyses, taking into account the nested nature of the observations. Findings – The results suggest that the execution of a high number of HR tasks does not lead to the occurrence of HR role stressors among front‐line managers. However, for the HR department it is important to create an appropriate environment in terms of giving HR support and advice to line managers, and training line managers regarding their HR competencies. Research limitations/implications – This research opens up interesting lines of inquiry regarding the conditions under which the partnership between the HR department and line management can be successful. Practical implications – The paper provides HR practitioners with insights into the conditions needed to avoid perceptions of HR role stressors among front‐line managers. Originality/value – The paper applies role theory in a new context, i.e. the HR role of front‐line managers. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Personnel Review Emerald Publishing

Antecedents of front‐line managers' perceptions of HR role stressors

Personnel Review , Volume 40 (5): 21 – Aug 2, 2011

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2011 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0048-3486
DOI
10.1108/00483481111154432
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – Based on role theory, this paper seeks to investigate the impact of HR devolution characteristics (number of devolved HR tasks), characteristics of the HR devolution context (level of support from the HR department, and presence of institutionalised incentives to perform the allotted HR tasks well), and personal characteristics of the front‐line managers (HR competency) on front‐line managers' perceptions of two HR role stressors, i.e. HR role ambiguity and HR role overload. Design/methodology/approach – The paper uses a sample of 169 front‐line managers from 47 organisations. The results are based on two moderation regression analyses, taking into account the nested nature of the observations. Findings – The results suggest that the execution of a high number of HR tasks does not lead to the occurrence of HR role stressors among front‐line managers. However, for the HR department it is important to create an appropriate environment in terms of giving HR support and advice to line managers, and training line managers regarding their HR competencies. Research limitations/implications – This research opens up interesting lines of inquiry regarding the conditions under which the partnership between the HR department and line management can be successful. Practical implications – The paper provides HR practitioners with insights into the conditions needed to avoid perceptions of HR role stressors among front‐line managers. Originality/value – The paper applies role theory in a new context, i.e. the HR role of front‐line managers.

Journal

Personnel ReviewEmerald Publishing

Published: Aug 2, 2011

Keywords: Human resource devolution; Human resource role stressors; Human resource support; Human resource competencies; Human resource incentives; Human resource management; Perception

References