Another Milestone

Another Milestone Aircraft Engineering THE MONTHLY SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL ORGAN OF THE AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING PROFESSION VOL XXI No 241 MARCH 1949 their souls'. How true, and at the same time how sad, this is. To the older among us it is a constant matter for regret that the indefinable N the words used by a famous Prime Minister when introducing a friendly adventurous spirit of the early days of aviation has so utterly broadcast address to the British nation, 'How quickly the years vanished beyond recall. One cannot help wondering, pessimistically, pass'. It is difficult to believe that another twelve months have gone how long the rotorcraft enthusiasts will be able to withstand the, we by since we last published DR KLEMIN'S review of an annual meeting fear, inevitably deadening effect of success now that they are no of the INSTITUTE OF THE AERONAUTICAL SCIENCES, which has been a longer knit together into a close companionship to form a laager of feature of AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING for more years than he probably protection, as it were, against the gibes and sneers of the fixed-wing will care to remember. Parenthetically, it is almost more difficult to school. A sidelight on this helicopter question is the amount of time realize that it is twenty years this devoted to, and the newly-found month since our first issue ap­ belief in the future of, 'convertible' peared in March 1929; but as we aircraft which promise so ingeni­ are postponing the celebration of ously to take advantage of the best this event till May we will not of two apparently incompatible elaborate on this theme for the worlds. It is particularly significant moment. that the paper discussing the pro­ spects of this 'omnibus' type was Changing Fashions staged not for the special benefit We have on occasion remarked of the helicopter enthusiasts but in the past when closing a volume for the delectation of the more how our annual index, by com­ sober-minded engineers in the parison with those that have gone 'Aircraft Design' Section, along before, provides a guide to the with such austere subjects as changes in the characteristics of boundary layer control and span- aircraft through the dropping out wise wing loading. of articles on familiar topics and the introduction of new subjects Meteorological Junketing brought to the forefront by the in­ Although the possibility of con­ genuity of research workers and trolling the weather by the artifi­ technicians in breaking ground in cial causation of precipation of fresh fields. In the same way the matters dealt with by those reading rain seems to have receded into the background as no longer to be papers at this annual American reunion are an indication of what is looked upon as a practical proposition, a new line in interference occupying the minds of the aeronautical world at the moment. As D R with natural atmospheric phenomena was dealt with in a paper des­ KLEMIN himself points out, a hint of such progress can appear in a cribing experiments in producing holes in stratus clouds by seeding variation in the choice of the title for one of the Sessions, such as the them with dry ice. From the point of view of direct application to significant substitution of 'Flight Propulsion' for 'Engines' to empha­ aircraft operation this appears to be of more specifically aeronautical size the evolution of the various permutations and combinations of interest than the other project, though whether or not it will prove jets and rockets and the replacement of the reciprocating engine as a to be any more practicable remains perhaps debatable. subject for discussion by these new types of prime mover and the problems peculiar to them. Similarly, the Aerodynamics Sessions has, A New Approach as he puts it, become less dramatic owing to the fact that considera­ The first article in this issue, which starts on the next page, is dis­ tion of the phenomena of transonic and supersonic flight has ceased tinctly off the beaten track of technical papers on aeronautical sub­ to be an adventure into the unknown and settled down as a more jects. We conceived, however, that this was not a reason for excluding humdrum examination of the detailed adjuncts of a by now com­ it but that on the other hand it should be laid before our readers as paratively well understood phase of flying; so that, to quote, providing an introduction to a line of thought which probably few of the papers presented 'dig deep but do not strike out into new them have hitherto followed. In connexion with production the use territory'. of statistical methods is by now common practice in the procedure known as Quality Control, on the subject of which we published a A Special Class number of articles during the war years. Owing to exigencies of space we were compelled reluctantly to In his article, M R SARAVANOS shows how the method can be de­ prune to some slight extent DR KLEMIN'S introductory paragraphs, veloped and extended, on lines already familiar to, for instance, but we should like here to rescue from the lost passages an interesting students of biology, to the examination of a planned series of statis­ remark that he makes in regard to 'the helicopter people'. They, he tics obtained in a more purely aeronautical field that is of great wrote, 'still have the romance and camaraderie of early pioneers in topical importance such as gust velocities. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

Another Milestone

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, Volume 21 (3): 1 – Mar 1, 1949

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb031734
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Aircraft Engineering THE MONTHLY SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL ORGAN OF THE AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING PROFESSION VOL XXI No 241 MARCH 1949 their souls'. How true, and at the same time how sad, this is. To the older among us it is a constant matter for regret that the indefinable N the words used by a famous Prime Minister when introducing a friendly adventurous spirit of the early days of aviation has so utterly broadcast address to the British nation, 'How quickly the years vanished beyond recall. One cannot help wondering, pessimistically, pass'. It is difficult to believe that another twelve months have gone how long the rotorcraft enthusiasts will be able to withstand the, we by since we last published DR KLEMIN'S review of an annual meeting fear, inevitably deadening effect of success now that they are no of the INSTITUTE OF THE AERONAUTICAL SCIENCES, which has been a longer knit together into a close companionship to form a laager of feature of AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING for more years than he probably protection, as it were, against the gibes and sneers of the fixed-wing will care to remember. Parenthetically, it is almost more difficult to school. A sidelight on this helicopter question is the amount of time realize that it is twenty years this devoted to, and the newly-found month since our first issue ap­ belief in the future of, 'convertible' peared in March 1929; but as we aircraft which promise so ingeni­ are postponing the celebration of ously to take advantage of the best this event till May we will not of two apparently incompatible elaborate on this theme for the worlds. It is particularly significant moment. that the paper discussing the pro­ spects of this 'omnibus' type was Changing Fashions staged not for the special benefit We have on occasion remarked of the helicopter enthusiasts but in the past when closing a volume for the delectation of the more how our annual index, by com­ sober-minded engineers in the parison with those that have gone 'Aircraft Design' Section, along before, provides a guide to the with such austere subjects as changes in the characteristics of boundary layer control and span- aircraft through the dropping out wise wing loading. of articles on familiar topics and the introduction of new subjects Meteorological Junketing brought to the forefront by the in­ Although the possibility of con­ genuity of research workers and trolling the weather by the artifi­ technicians in breaking ground in cial causation of precipation of fresh fields. In the same way the matters dealt with by those reading rain seems to have receded into the background as no longer to be papers at this annual American reunion are an indication of what is looked upon as a practical proposition, a new line in interference occupying the minds of the aeronautical world at the moment. As D R with natural atmospheric phenomena was dealt with in a paper des­ KLEMIN himself points out, a hint of such progress can appear in a cribing experiments in producing holes in stratus clouds by seeding variation in the choice of the title for one of the Sessions, such as the them with dry ice. From the point of view of direct application to significant substitution of 'Flight Propulsion' for 'Engines' to empha­ aircraft operation this appears to be of more specifically aeronautical size the evolution of the various permutations and combinations of interest than the other project, though whether or not it will prove jets and rockets and the replacement of the reciprocating engine as a to be any more practicable remains perhaps debatable. subject for discussion by these new types of prime mover and the problems peculiar to them. Similarly, the Aerodynamics Sessions has, A New Approach as he puts it, become less dramatic owing to the fact that considera­ The first article in this issue, which starts on the next page, is dis­ tion of the phenomena of transonic and supersonic flight has ceased tinctly off the beaten track of technical papers on aeronautical sub­ to be an adventure into the unknown and settled down as a more jects. We conceived, however, that this was not a reason for excluding humdrum examination of the detailed adjuncts of a by now com­ it but that on the other hand it should be laid before our readers as paratively well understood phase of flying; so that, to quote, providing an introduction to a line of thought which probably few of the papers presented 'dig deep but do not strike out into new them have hitherto followed. In connexion with production the use territory'. of statistical methods is by now common practice in the procedure known as Quality Control, on the subject of which we published a A Special Class number of articles during the war years. Owing to exigencies of space we were compelled reluctantly to In his article, M R SARAVANOS shows how the method can be de­ prune to some slight extent DR KLEMIN'S introductory paragraphs, veloped and extended, on lines already familiar to, for instance, but we should like here to rescue from the lost passages an interesting students of biology, to the examination of a planned series of statis­ remark that he makes in regard to 'the helicopter people'. They, he tics obtained in a more purely aeronautical field that is of great wrote, 'still have the romance and camaraderie of early pioneers in topical importance such as gust velocities.

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Mar 1, 1949

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