Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Analysis of strain and stress concentrations in micro-lattice structures manufactured by SLM

Analysis of strain and stress concentrations in micro-lattice structures manufactured by SLM Additive manufacturing (AM) enables the production of lightweight parts with complex shapes and small dimensions. Recent improvements in AM techniques have allowed a significant growth of AM for industrial applications. In particular, AM is suitable for the production of materials shaped in lattice, which are very attractive for their lightweight design and their multi-functional properties. AM parts are often characterised by geometrical imperfections, residual porosity, high surface roughness which typically lead to stress/strain localisations and decreasing the resistance of the structure. This paper aims to focus on the study of the effects of geometrical irregularities and stress concentrations derived from them.Design/methodology/approachIn this paper, several technique were combined: 3D tomography, experimental tests, digital image correlation and finite elements (FE) models based on both the as-designed and the as-manufactured geometries of lattice materials. The Digital Image Correlation technique allowed to measure local deformations in the specimen during the experimental test. The micro-computed tomography allowed to reconstruct the as-manufactured geometries of the specimens, from which the geometrical quality of the micro-structure is evaluated to run FE analyses.FindingsExperimental and numerical results were compared by means of a stress concentration factor. This factor was calculated in three different specimens obtained from three-different printing processes to compare and understand their mechanical properties. Considering the as-designed geometry, it is not possible to model geometrical imperfections, and a FE model based on an as-manufactured geometry is needed. The results show that the mechanical properties of the printed samples are directly related to the statistical distribution of the stress concentration factor.Originality/valueIn this work, several techniques were combined to study the mechanical behaviour of lattice micro-structures. Lattice materials obtained by different selective laser melting printing parameters show different mechanical behaviours. A stress concentration factor can be assumed as a measure of the quality of these mechanical properties. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Rapid Prototyping Journal Emerald Publishing

Analysis of strain and stress concentrations in micro-lattice structures manufactured by SLM

Loading next page...
 
/lp/emerald-publishing/analysis-of-strain-and-stress-concentrations-in-micro-lattice-xyRATpmtQ7

References (32)

Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
© Emerald Publishing Limited
ISSN
1355-2546
DOI
10.1108/rpj-10-2018-0270
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Additive manufacturing (AM) enables the production of lightweight parts with complex shapes and small dimensions. Recent improvements in AM techniques have allowed a significant growth of AM for industrial applications. In particular, AM is suitable for the production of materials shaped in lattice, which are very attractive for their lightweight design and their multi-functional properties. AM parts are often characterised by geometrical imperfections, residual porosity, high surface roughness which typically lead to stress/strain localisations and decreasing the resistance of the structure. This paper aims to focus on the study of the effects of geometrical irregularities and stress concentrations derived from them.Design/methodology/approachIn this paper, several technique were combined: 3D tomography, experimental tests, digital image correlation and finite elements (FE) models based on both the as-designed and the as-manufactured geometries of lattice materials. The Digital Image Correlation technique allowed to measure local deformations in the specimen during the experimental test. The micro-computed tomography allowed to reconstruct the as-manufactured geometries of the specimens, from which the geometrical quality of the micro-structure is evaluated to run FE analyses.FindingsExperimental and numerical results were compared by means of a stress concentration factor. This factor was calculated in three different specimens obtained from three-different printing processes to compare and understand their mechanical properties. Considering the as-designed geometry, it is not possible to model geometrical imperfections, and a FE model based on an as-manufactured geometry is needed. The results show that the mechanical properties of the printed samples are directly related to the statistical distribution of the stress concentration factor.Originality/valueIn this work, several techniques were combined to study the mechanical behaviour of lattice micro-structures. Lattice materials obtained by different selective laser melting printing parameters show different mechanical behaviours. A stress concentration factor can be assumed as a measure of the quality of these mechanical properties.

Journal

Rapid Prototyping JournalEmerald Publishing

Published: Feb 25, 2020

Keywords: Printing; Advanced manufacturing technologies; Numerical simulation; Aluminium

There are no references for this article.