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An introduction to radio frequency identification (RFID) methods and solutions

An introduction to radio frequency identification (RFID) methods and solutions Purpose – This paper aims to introduce some of the most important engineering, and information systems management principles and challenges, that radio frequency identification (RFID) researchers, implementers and users should keep in mind when developing such systems, and/or planning for such applications. Design/methodology/approach – Provides a general review of RFID systems. Findings – RFID technologies with the appropriate IT infrastructure help both major distributors and manufacturers, as well as other logistics operations, such as the health‐care system, defense industries, and others, dealing with complex, global supply chains in which products and product shipments must be traced and identified in a non‐contact, wireless fashion using a computer network, because of cost, or security, or safety, or because parts are subject to corrosion, or food/medicine is subject to quality degradation, or other reasons. All of these requirements point to an automated, wireless‐readable sensory‐based identification method, and network, that offers more functionalities and is significantly “smarter” than the well known bar code or the unified product code. RFIDs are available as passive and/or active radio read/write sensor‐packages with active read (and often write) capabilities in relatively large areas (like a large distribution centre warehouse, or a containership), all performed automatically, supervised by computers and communicated in a wireless fashion over secure intranets. RFID represents great research, technology, as well as huge business opportunities. Practical implications – RFID has the potential to change the way we do business all around the world. It is a huge challenge, not just because of the sophisticated sensor‐network technology, but also because of the vast systems integration and IT tasks ahead of us. Originality/value – Reviews the current state‐of‐the‐art and future opportunities. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Assembly Automation Emerald Publishing

An introduction to radio frequency identification (RFID) methods and solutions

Assembly Automation , Volume 26 (1): 6 – Jan 1, 2006

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0144-5154
DOI
10.1108/01445150610645639
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – This paper aims to introduce some of the most important engineering, and information systems management principles and challenges, that radio frequency identification (RFID) researchers, implementers and users should keep in mind when developing such systems, and/or planning for such applications. Design/methodology/approach – Provides a general review of RFID systems. Findings – RFID technologies with the appropriate IT infrastructure help both major distributors and manufacturers, as well as other logistics operations, such as the health‐care system, defense industries, and others, dealing with complex, global supply chains in which products and product shipments must be traced and identified in a non‐contact, wireless fashion using a computer network, because of cost, or security, or safety, or because parts are subject to corrosion, or food/medicine is subject to quality degradation, or other reasons. All of these requirements point to an automated, wireless‐readable sensory‐based identification method, and network, that offers more functionalities and is significantly “smarter” than the well known bar code or the unified product code. RFIDs are available as passive and/or active radio read/write sensor‐packages with active read (and often write) capabilities in relatively large areas (like a large distribution centre warehouse, or a containership), all performed automatically, supervised by computers and communicated in a wireless fashion over secure intranets. RFID represents great research, technology, as well as huge business opportunities. Practical implications – RFID has the potential to change the way we do business all around the world. It is a huge challenge, not just because of the sophisticated sensor‐network technology, but also because of the vast systems integration and IT tasks ahead of us. Originality/value – Reviews the current state‐of‐the‐art and future opportunities.

Journal

Assembly AutomationEmerald Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 2006

Keywords: Radio networks; Supply chain management; Sensors; Network analysis (circuits); Modelling

References

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