An international collaboration to promote inquiry‐based learning in undergraduate engineering classrooms

An international collaboration to promote inquiry‐based learning in undergraduate engineering... Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to describe specific techniques of “inquiry‐based learning” employed by three instructors in Engineering schools, one in Europe and two in the USA. Design/methodology/approach – Theorists such as Bransford et al. argue that twenty‐first century educators need to teach students to do more than simply remember and repeat information. Engineering educators Prince and Felder critique traditional methods of teaching in which instructors focus on mathematics and theory, but fail to convey practical applications of that knowledge. They advocate moving students to a higher level of learning – past the stage of memorizing and reciting data – to more sophisticated methods of analysis, synthesis, and application of knowledge. To enact such transformations, Prince and Felder recommend “inductive teaching methods,” including “inquiry‐based learning,” in which students learn through engaging with challenges and a series of questions. The paper provides examples of inquiry‐based learning activities from each of the authors. The paper then discusses the cross‐pollination of ideas and describes how the authors have shared inquiry‐based teaching strategies and collaborated to develop new and relevant assignments and approaches to teaching. Findings – The willingness of learners to discuss a range of pedagogical topics, from specific practices to shared experiences and readings, led to an exchange of ideas, and also to deeper reflections on current practices. The cross‐pollination of assignments and techniques resulted in well‐structured, stimulating, and relevant research projects that engage engineering students from Texas to Portugal, and from communication to technical classes. Research limitations/implications – The use of inquiry‐based learning activities and the sharing of resources across continents aimed at improving learning and teaching requires expanding upon and further development. Originality/value – The paper demonstrates the use of cross‐pollination of ideas, development of assignments and improved approaches to teaching. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Campus-Wide Information Systems Emerald Publishing

An international collaboration to promote inquiry‐based learning in undergraduate engineering classrooms

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2012 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1065-0741
DOI
10.1108/10650741211253859
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to describe specific techniques of “inquiry‐based learning” employed by three instructors in Engineering schools, one in Europe and two in the USA. Design/methodology/approach – Theorists such as Bransford et al. argue that twenty‐first century educators need to teach students to do more than simply remember and repeat information. Engineering educators Prince and Felder critique traditional methods of teaching in which instructors focus on mathematics and theory, but fail to convey practical applications of that knowledge. They advocate moving students to a higher level of learning – past the stage of memorizing and reciting data – to more sophisticated methods of analysis, synthesis, and application of knowledge. To enact such transformations, Prince and Felder recommend “inductive teaching methods,” including “inquiry‐based learning,” in which students learn through engaging with challenges and a series of questions. The paper provides examples of inquiry‐based learning activities from each of the authors. The paper then discusses the cross‐pollination of ideas and describes how the authors have shared inquiry‐based teaching strategies and collaborated to develop new and relevant assignments and approaches to teaching. Findings – The willingness of learners to discuss a range of pedagogical topics, from specific practices to shared experiences and readings, led to an exchange of ideas, and also to deeper reflections on current practices. The cross‐pollination of assignments and techniques resulted in well‐structured, stimulating, and relevant research projects that engage engineering students from Texas to Portugal, and from communication to technical classes. Research limitations/implications – The use of inquiry‐based learning activities and the sharing of resources across continents aimed at improving learning and teaching requires expanding upon and further development. Originality/value – The paper demonstrates the use of cross‐pollination of ideas, development of assignments and improved approaches to teaching.

Journal

Campus-Wide Information SystemsEmerald Publishing

Published: Aug 24, 2012

Keywords: United States of America; Portugal; Universities; Undergraduates; Curricula; Engineering; Collaboration; Inquiry based learning; Engineering communications; Inquiry based teaching; Engineering education; Research spiral process

References

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