An Interesting Introscope

An Interesting Introscope Workshop and Production Section AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING November, 1938 T has long been general engineering and scientific man y applications. The instrument carries, at practice to employ some form of refracting th e far end, a small lamp and self-contained circuit I instrumen t for the visual inspection of interior whereby a powerful illumination is throw n upon the details where the detection of small flaws is of the surface of the bore at a slight angle with the radial greatest importance. Such instruments vary from direction of view so tha t inequalities are not only th e large periscopic torch carried by aircraft magnified, but thrown up in high relief. The user inspectors when looking for damage or bad work­ sees a circular field in front of him, actually a part manshi p in the structure of an aeroplane, down to of the bore, and is able to inspect every detail on th e delicate appliances used by doctors when tha t section of the surface. By advancing and makin g similar researches into huma n beings. The rotatin g the instrument the whole of the bore may development in recent years of very precisely be quickly inspected. manufactured details in machinery and armaments, Th e valve stem s of most modern high-performance such as th e hollow-stemmed, sodium-filled valves of aero-engines have a hollow bore which, for successful aero-engines, the delicately ground cylinders of service, must have a true shape and mirror-like hydraulic selector units, the intricate interiors of finish. To inspect such a recess the operator compression-ignition injector valves, and the in­ mus t be able to see no t only the side bu t the closed creasingly accurate rifling of the bores of modern end ; this is achieved by the double-tube Intro­ small arms has led to the designing of a very neat scope. Here the view is downward and diagonal instrumen t for the inspection of such parts. This consists of an eye-piece and inspection tube, which overlapping the axis of th e bore so tha t during inser­ "mechanica l eye," as th e manufacturers, the Foster ac t together as a low-powered microscope, and a tion the parallel portion is inspected and then, finally Instrumen t Co., Ltd., call it, is an Introscope of pea-bul b in circuit with a battery—in the confined th e closed end is seen. The inspection jig allows ver y varied application. It is almost as delicate spaces to be inspected the small bulb provides a rapid and convenient inspection by rotating the in size as the medical profession's appliances, but high degree of illumination. The illustrations which valve while the Introscope is slowly advanced. is more robustly made and easily capable of with­ ar e published on this page show three forms of this Anothe r example of a double-tube type is the very standin g the ordinary usage of th e inspection room. Introscop e having, either directly or indirectly, an small instrument adapted for inspection of Diesel Th e Foster Introscope is obtainabl e in man y forms, fuel jets, wherein are peculiarly formed recess and interes t to the aeronautical inspector. adapte d to suit particular purposes. Basically it oil holes which must be accurately finished. Th e barrel of a rifle or machine-gun is one of A SIMPLE PRESS By N. A. de Bruyne and G. Newell HER E is in most laboratories where mechanical testing is done need for a small T press of from one to two tons capacity. Such a press is also useful for research on plastic material s and glued joints. Our attempts to adapt hydrauli c motor-car jacks were unsuccessful be­ cause of the impossibility of eliminating leakage, th e difficulty of fitting a gauge, and the considerable friction between the piston and cylinder. The press illustrated was made quite cheaply, is com­ pletely leak-proof, and will therefore hold its pressure indefinitely, and is worked off the main wate r supply. This type of press is due to Prof. R. W. Pohl, of Göttingen (see "Physica l Principles of Mechanics and Acoustics"; Blackie & Son, Ltd. : London, 1932); essentially it consists of a to y rubber football which is inflated by water and prevente d from bursting through being completely enclosed. Fig. 1 shows the construction of the press, and Fig. 2 the press ready for use. The rubbe r football is supported on a cylindrical wood block made slightly concave on its top surface; over the football is placed an iron pot (we used the end of a pressure vessel of ten inches internal diameter) . An important part of the press is the leathe r strip round the top end of the wooden block, which prevents the football from inflating down int o the gap between the outside of the wooden block and the inside of the metal pot. Our water suppl y at Duxford is about 50 lb. per sq. inch., so tha t the total load developed is about 1¾ tons. Th e top platen has been made adjustable to allow test s t o be made on struts. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

An Interesting Introscope

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, Volume 10 (11): 1 – Nov 1, 1938

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb030402
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Workshop and Production Section AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING November, 1938 T has long been general engineering and scientific man y applications. The instrument carries, at practice to employ some form of refracting th e far end, a small lamp and self-contained circuit I instrumen t for the visual inspection of interior whereby a powerful illumination is throw n upon the details where the detection of small flaws is of the surface of the bore at a slight angle with the radial greatest importance. Such instruments vary from direction of view so tha t inequalities are not only th e large periscopic torch carried by aircraft magnified, but thrown up in high relief. The user inspectors when looking for damage or bad work­ sees a circular field in front of him, actually a part manshi p in the structure of an aeroplane, down to of the bore, and is able to inspect every detail on th e delicate appliances used by doctors when tha t section of the surface. By advancing and makin g similar researches into huma n beings. The rotatin g the instrument the whole of the bore may development in recent years of very precisely be quickly inspected. manufactured details in machinery and armaments, Th e valve stem s of most modern high-performance such as th e hollow-stemmed, sodium-filled valves of aero-engines have a hollow bore which, for successful aero-engines, the delicately ground cylinders of service, must have a true shape and mirror-like hydraulic selector units, the intricate interiors of finish. To inspect such a recess the operator compression-ignition injector valves, and the in­ mus t be able to see no t only the side bu t the closed creasingly accurate rifling of the bores of modern end ; this is achieved by the double-tube Intro­ small arms has led to the designing of a very neat scope. Here the view is downward and diagonal instrumen t for the inspection of such parts. This consists of an eye-piece and inspection tube, which overlapping the axis of th e bore so tha t during inser­ "mechanica l eye," as th e manufacturers, the Foster ac t together as a low-powered microscope, and a tion the parallel portion is inspected and then, finally Instrumen t Co., Ltd., call it, is an Introscope of pea-bul b in circuit with a battery—in the confined th e closed end is seen. The inspection jig allows ver y varied application. It is almost as delicate spaces to be inspected the small bulb provides a rapid and convenient inspection by rotating the in size as the medical profession's appliances, but high degree of illumination. The illustrations which valve while the Introscope is slowly advanced. is more robustly made and easily capable of with­ ar e published on this page show three forms of this Anothe r example of a double-tube type is the very standin g the ordinary usage of th e inspection room. Introscop e having, either directly or indirectly, an small instrument adapted for inspection of Diesel Th e Foster Introscope is obtainabl e in man y forms, fuel jets, wherein are peculiarly formed recess and interes t to the aeronautical inspector. adapte d to suit particular purposes. Basically it oil holes which must be accurately finished. Th e barrel of a rifle or machine-gun is one of A SIMPLE PRESS By N. A. de Bruyne and G. Newell HER E is in most laboratories where mechanical testing is done need for a small T press of from one to two tons capacity. Such a press is also useful for research on plastic material s and glued joints. Our attempts to adapt hydrauli c motor-car jacks were unsuccessful be­ cause of the impossibility of eliminating leakage, th e difficulty of fitting a gauge, and the considerable friction between the piston and cylinder. The press illustrated was made quite cheaply, is com­ pletely leak-proof, and will therefore hold its pressure indefinitely, and is worked off the main wate r supply. This type of press is due to Prof. R. W. Pohl, of Göttingen (see "Physica l Principles of Mechanics and Acoustics"; Blackie & Son, Ltd. : London, 1932); essentially it consists of a to y rubber football which is inflated by water and prevente d from bursting through being completely enclosed. Fig. 1 shows the construction of the press, and Fig. 2 the press ready for use. The rubbe r football is supported on a cylindrical wood block made slightly concave on its top surface; over the football is placed an iron pot (we used the end of a pressure vessel of ten inches internal diameter) . An important part of the press is the leathe r strip round the top end of the wooden block, which prevents the football from inflating down int o the gap between the outside of the wooden block and the inside of the metal pot. Our water suppl y at Duxford is about 50 lb. per sq. inch., so tha t the total load developed is about 1¾ tons. Th e top platen has been made adjustable to allow test s t o be made on struts.

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Nov 1, 1938

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