An integrative transformative service framework to improve engagement in a social service ecosystem: the case of He Waka Tapu

An integrative transformative service framework to improve engagement in a social service... PurposeThis study aims to understand the engagement between an indigenous social service provider and marginalised clients deemed “hard-to-reach” to gain an insight into how to improve the client’s engagement and well-being through transformative value co-creation.Design/methodology/approachThe exploratory study’s findings draw on primary data employing a qualitative research approach through document analysis and in-depth interviews with clients, social workers and stakeholders of the focal social service provider in New Zealand.FindingsThe findings indicate that there are inhibitors and enablers of value or well-being co-creation. The lack of client resources and a mismatch between client and social worker are primary barriers. Other actors as well as cultural practices are identified as enablers of well-being improvement.Research limitations/implicationsThis research reports on a single social service provider and its clients. These findings may not be readily transferrable to other contexts.Practical implicationsFindings indicate that social service providers require a heightened awareness of the inhibitors and enablers of social service co-creation.Social implicationsBoth the integrative framework and the findings provide a sound critique of the prevailing policy discourse surrounding the stigmatisation of members of society deemed “hard-to-reach” and the usefulness of such an approach when aiming at resolving social issues.Originality/valueThis is the first exploratory study that reports on the engagement between a social service provider and its clients in a dedicated Māori (indigenous) context by employing an integrative research approach combining transformative service research, activity theory and engagement theory. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Services Marketing Emerald Publishing

An integrative transformative service framework to improve engagement in a social service ecosystem: the case of He Waka Tapu

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0887-6045
DOI
10.1108/JSM-06-2016-0222
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

PurposeThis study aims to understand the engagement between an indigenous social service provider and marginalised clients deemed “hard-to-reach” to gain an insight into how to improve the client’s engagement and well-being through transformative value co-creation.Design/methodology/approachThe exploratory study’s findings draw on primary data employing a qualitative research approach through document analysis and in-depth interviews with clients, social workers and stakeholders of the focal social service provider in New Zealand.FindingsThe findings indicate that there are inhibitors and enablers of value or well-being co-creation. The lack of client resources and a mismatch between client and social worker are primary barriers. Other actors as well as cultural practices are identified as enablers of well-being improvement.Research limitations/implicationsThis research reports on a single social service provider and its clients. These findings may not be readily transferrable to other contexts.Practical implicationsFindings indicate that social service providers require a heightened awareness of the inhibitors and enablers of social service co-creation.Social implicationsBoth the integrative framework and the findings provide a sound critique of the prevailing policy discourse surrounding the stigmatisation of members of society deemed “hard-to-reach” and the usefulness of such an approach when aiming at resolving social issues.Originality/valueThis is the first exploratory study that reports on the engagement between a social service provider and its clients in a dedicated Māori (indigenous) context by employing an integrative research approach combining transformative service research, activity theory and engagement theory.

Journal

Journal of Services MarketingEmerald Publishing

Published: Jul 10, 2017

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