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An integrated model of consumers' decision-making process in social commerce: a cross-cultural study of the United States and China

An integrated model of consumers' decision-making process in social commerce: a cross-cultural... The purpose of this study was to understand consumers' continuance intention to purchase in social commerce from an integrated perspective of the expectation confirmation model (ECM) and information adoption model (IAM). Moreover, the cultural difference between the United States and China was explored in the integrated model.Design/methodology/approachA total of 1,589 responses were collected from American (n = 725) and Chinese consumers (n = 864). The partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) was applied to perform measurement assessment, structural model and multiple group analysis.FindingsResults showed that consumers' continuance intention to purchase in social commerce was significantly predicted by the integrated model. Within the ECM, confirmation of expectations positively affected information usefulness and satisfaction, and information usefulness positively influenced satisfaction, which further led to continuance intention. Moreover, within the IAM, both argument quality and source credibility positively affect information usefulness, which leads to information adoption and continuance intention to purchase in social commerce. In addition, the influences of information usefulness on information adoption and continuance intention to purchase in social commerce were stronger for American consumers.Originality/valueThe findings of this study gain a better understanding of consumers' decision-making process and cultural differences between American and Chinese consumers. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics Emerald Publishing

An integrated model of consumers' decision-making process in social commerce: a cross-cultural study of the United States and China

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References (60)

Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
© Emerald Publishing Limited
ISSN
1355-5855
DOI
10.1108/apjml-01-2022-0029
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to understand consumers' continuance intention to purchase in social commerce from an integrated perspective of the expectation confirmation model (ECM) and information adoption model (IAM). Moreover, the cultural difference between the United States and China was explored in the integrated model.Design/methodology/approachA total of 1,589 responses were collected from American (n = 725) and Chinese consumers (n = 864). The partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) was applied to perform measurement assessment, structural model and multiple group analysis.FindingsResults showed that consumers' continuance intention to purchase in social commerce was significantly predicted by the integrated model. Within the ECM, confirmation of expectations positively affected information usefulness and satisfaction, and information usefulness positively influenced satisfaction, which further led to continuance intention. Moreover, within the IAM, both argument quality and source credibility positively affect information usefulness, which leads to information adoption and continuance intention to purchase in social commerce. In addition, the influences of information usefulness on information adoption and continuance intention to purchase in social commerce were stronger for American consumers.Originality/valueThe findings of this study gain a better understanding of consumers' decision-making process and cultural differences between American and Chinese consumers.

Journal

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and LogisticsEmerald Publishing

Published: Jun 27, 2023

Keywords: Social commerce; Expectation confirmation model; Information adoption model; Decision-making process; Cultural difference

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