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An Empirical Investigation of Knowledge Management Styles and Their Effects on Learning Capacity

An Empirical Investigation of Knowledge Management Styles and Their Effects on Learning Capacity This paper analyzes how organizations may use different knowledge management styles according to higher or lower emphasis on (1) techno‐structural initiatives for information processing, and (2) behavioral solutions for knowledge sharing by organizational members. As a consequence, the effects of these styles on learning capacity are also different. The empirical analysis of the present study found that knowledge management practices can be categorized into four styles: (1) passive, (2) behavioral, (3) techno‐structural, and (4) active. The active style, which implies superior management of both techno‐structural and behavioral tools of knowledge management has been the most effective in the development of learning capacity. In contrast, the passive style, which implies weak management of both kinds of knowledge management initiatives, results in lower learning capacity. Hence, this work focuses on suggesting and empirically testing a characteristic framework for how a set of knowledge management initiatives interact and influence learning capacity in organizations. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Management Research: The Journal of the Iberoamerican Academy of Management Emerald Publishing

An Empirical Investigation of Knowledge Management Styles and Their Effects on Learning Capacity

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1536-5433
DOI
10.1108/15365430480000506
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This paper analyzes how organizations may use different knowledge management styles according to higher or lower emphasis on (1) techno‐structural initiatives for information processing, and (2) behavioral solutions for knowledge sharing by organizational members. As a consequence, the effects of these styles on learning capacity are also different. The empirical analysis of the present study found that knowledge management practices can be categorized into four styles: (1) passive, (2) behavioral, (3) techno‐structural, and (4) active. The active style, which implies superior management of both techno‐structural and behavioral tools of knowledge management has been the most effective in the development of learning capacity. In contrast, the passive style, which implies weak management of both kinds of knowledge management initiatives, results in lower learning capacity. Hence, this work focuses on suggesting and empirically testing a characteristic framework for how a set of knowledge management initiatives interact and influence learning capacity in organizations.

Journal

Management Research: The Journal of the Iberoamerican Academy of ManagementEmerald Publishing

Published: Jul 1, 2004

Keywords: Knowledge management; Management styles; Technology; Knowledge‐sharing; Learning

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