An Eclectic Issue

An Eclectic Issue Aircraft Engineering THE MONTHLY SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL ORGAN OF THE AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING PROFESSION VOL XVIII No 210 AUGUST 1946 the various structural items in an aeroplane according to their importance from the point of view of potential failure and therefore HIS issue may be said to have an unusually wide appeal in suitability or otherwise for patching and repair. This is one of those that it has an article of interest to almost everyone in the instances when the reproduction of coloured diagrams is not merely TIndustry. The subjects dealt with range from aerodynamics pictorially attractive but essential to a proper understanding of the and structures, jet and piston engines, to production control in the text. We have little doubt that this admirable scheme will be retained factory and inspection and repair. and extended into the field of operation of commercial aeroplanes. In the same Production and Maintenance Section is an interesting A Restrictive Circumstance paper on production control as carried out in Pacific Coast aircraft It is of course our constant aim to be thus eclectic in the ground factories in America and the methods used on the other side of the covered in these pages, but this is by no means easy to achieve in a Atlantic to train students in the theories of industrial management single issue, and in the main we are afraid readers have had to be and to fit them for responsible executive posts on the production side content sometimes to wait for some months before an article on of the industry. Readers will remember an article on this subject by their own special subject may appear. We are grateful to them for MR . D. TIRANTI, embodying a synopsis of a typical course, which their patience and understanding in realizing this. I t is due in large we published in November, 1944. measure to the continuing difficulties of production, some of which No description of the Westinghouse axial-flow turbine engine has, we explained in our editorial of last month—which was not, we so far as we are aware, been published—certainly nothing so de­ hope, of too "domestic" a character. A point with which we did not tailed as that which, through the courtesy of the Company, appears then deal, but which has recently become of increasing import, is the in this issue. It has not yet attained the thrust that is now produced publication of articles containing a high proportion of formulae by the more highly-developed British engines, but no doubt its and mathematical notation. Matter of this nature cannot be tapped performance will be increased. It is a light engine of small diameter out on a machine in the same way as ordinary text, but has to be set and should undoubtedly have a future before it, well sponsored as laboriously by hand at great expenditure of time—and consequently it is. It is always interesting to have details of foreign products for money. For reasons connected with the change-over from war to comparison with their British counterparts, particularly when, as in peacetime conditions and the return to civil life of men from the this instance, there is such a difference in the basic design as that Forces, the position in regard to this has become more difficult of between axial and centrifugal flow turbines so far as actual achieve­ late, and has indeed raised a problem of some acuteness. Believing ment in service is concerned. that all engineering must exist on a sound substratum of mathe­ matics we have never shirked what we believe to be our duty in A Useful Prejudice publishing a certain proportion of articles containing a good deal A perennial problem with engines of what one still tends to con­ of mathematics in them. The adoption of stressed-skin construction sider as of "conventional" type is that of starting from cold. FLIGHT- has been one of the factors—the increase of speeds approaching the LIEUTENANT PICKERING contributes to this issue a survey of the speed of sound being another—that has inevitably had the effect of problems involved and methods designed for their solution. Owing increasing the amount of such material that has been submitted to us to some idiosyncrasy inherent in the British character motor-car for publication in recent months. In the result, the weight of mathe­ owners in this country have always resented time wasted in warming matical articles awaiting appearance has become somewhat burden­ up a cold engine before setting out on the road and this had in some some, and we have been compelled seriously to review the position obscure way affected British aero-engine designers so that they have and come to the decision that, at any rate for the time being, they always adopted starting methods to operate more quickly than will have to be strictly "rationed" and leavened by a higher per­ those prevalent in other countries. From America, on the other centage of more straightforward material. Even so, AIRCRAFT hand, came the practice of injecting a small quantity of petrol into ENGINEERING will be giving publicity to a number of contributions the oil to facilitate quicker opening up of the throttle. The necessities of what may be described as a basic nature for which, we venture to of war intensified progress on this problem generally, with the result claim, no other aeronautical periodical—and few of a more general that aeroplanes were able to take off to meet the V. 1 missiles within engineering character—consistently caters. This will serve to explain five minutes of receipt of a warning—in striking contrast to the to some of our long-suffering authors why the already unconscion­ days of the Battle of Britain when engines had to be run every half- able delay in the appearance of their contributions will, we fear, be hour or so in order to keep them warm in readiness for a quick even further extended. We can only ask them to be yet more take-off for interception purposes. patient and appreciate that the lag is not any reflection on the intrinsic merit of their work but purely due to the circumstance we There is no space in which to consider in detail the other con­ tributions in this issue which are mainly concerned with the ever- have detailed which is entirely beyond our control. popular subject of stressing in various forms, and the immediately urgent problem of shock waves, which is beginning to provide a Some Outstanding Features serious headache for the aerodynamicist. These are dealt with in an One of the most interesting features of this issue is perhaps the informative article introducing the reader to the physical concepts underlying the purely mathematical aspect of the subject with which explanation of the ingenious system developed during the many of them are already familiar. late war, for the benefit of diluted personnel, of classifying http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

An Eclectic Issue

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, Volume 18 (8): 1 – Aug 1, 1946

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb031398
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Aircraft Engineering THE MONTHLY SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL ORGAN OF THE AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING PROFESSION VOL XVIII No 210 AUGUST 1946 the various structural items in an aeroplane according to their importance from the point of view of potential failure and therefore HIS issue may be said to have an unusually wide appeal in suitability or otherwise for patching and repair. This is one of those that it has an article of interest to almost everyone in the instances when the reproduction of coloured diagrams is not merely TIndustry. The subjects dealt with range from aerodynamics pictorially attractive but essential to a proper understanding of the and structures, jet and piston engines, to production control in the text. We have little doubt that this admirable scheme will be retained factory and inspection and repair. and extended into the field of operation of commercial aeroplanes. In the same Production and Maintenance Section is an interesting A Restrictive Circumstance paper on production control as carried out in Pacific Coast aircraft It is of course our constant aim to be thus eclectic in the ground factories in America and the methods used on the other side of the covered in these pages, but this is by no means easy to achieve in a Atlantic to train students in the theories of industrial management single issue, and in the main we are afraid readers have had to be and to fit them for responsible executive posts on the production side content sometimes to wait for some months before an article on of the industry. Readers will remember an article on this subject by their own special subject may appear. We are grateful to them for MR . D. TIRANTI, embodying a synopsis of a typical course, which their patience and understanding in realizing this. I t is due in large we published in November, 1944. measure to the continuing difficulties of production, some of which No description of the Westinghouse axial-flow turbine engine has, we explained in our editorial of last month—which was not, we so far as we are aware, been published—certainly nothing so de­ hope, of too "domestic" a character. A point with which we did not tailed as that which, through the courtesy of the Company, appears then deal, but which has recently become of increasing import, is the in this issue. It has not yet attained the thrust that is now produced publication of articles containing a high proportion of formulae by the more highly-developed British engines, but no doubt its and mathematical notation. Matter of this nature cannot be tapped performance will be increased. It is a light engine of small diameter out on a machine in the same way as ordinary text, but has to be set and should undoubtedly have a future before it, well sponsored as laboriously by hand at great expenditure of time—and consequently it is. It is always interesting to have details of foreign products for money. For reasons connected with the change-over from war to comparison with their British counterparts, particularly when, as in peacetime conditions and the return to civil life of men from the this instance, there is such a difference in the basic design as that Forces, the position in regard to this has become more difficult of between axial and centrifugal flow turbines so far as actual achieve­ late, and has indeed raised a problem of some acuteness. Believing ment in service is concerned. that all engineering must exist on a sound substratum of mathe­ matics we have never shirked what we believe to be our duty in A Useful Prejudice publishing a certain proportion of articles containing a good deal A perennial problem with engines of what one still tends to con­ of mathematics in them. The adoption of stressed-skin construction sider as of "conventional" type is that of starting from cold. FLIGHT- has been one of the factors—the increase of speeds approaching the LIEUTENANT PICKERING contributes to this issue a survey of the speed of sound being another—that has inevitably had the effect of problems involved and methods designed for their solution. Owing increasing the amount of such material that has been submitted to us to some idiosyncrasy inherent in the British character motor-car for publication in recent months. In the result, the weight of mathe­ owners in this country have always resented time wasted in warming matical articles awaiting appearance has become somewhat burden­ up a cold engine before setting out on the road and this had in some some, and we have been compelled seriously to review the position obscure way affected British aero-engine designers so that they have and come to the decision that, at any rate for the time being, they always adopted starting methods to operate more quickly than will have to be strictly "rationed" and leavened by a higher per­ those prevalent in other countries. From America, on the other centage of more straightforward material. Even so, AIRCRAFT hand, came the practice of injecting a small quantity of petrol into ENGINEERING will be giving publicity to a number of contributions the oil to facilitate quicker opening up of the throttle. The necessities of what may be described as a basic nature for which, we venture to of war intensified progress on this problem generally, with the result claim, no other aeronautical periodical—and few of a more general that aeroplanes were able to take off to meet the V. 1 missiles within engineering character—consistently caters. This will serve to explain five minutes of receipt of a warning—in striking contrast to the to some of our long-suffering authors why the already unconscion­ days of the Battle of Britain when engines had to be run every half- able delay in the appearance of their contributions will, we fear, be hour or so in order to keep them warm in readiness for a quick even further extended. We can only ask them to be yet more take-off for interception purposes. patient and appreciate that the lag is not any reflection on the intrinsic merit of their work but purely due to the circumstance we There is no space in which to consider in detail the other con­ tributions in this issue which are mainly concerned with the ever- have detailed which is entirely beyond our control. popular subject of stressing in various forms, and the immediately urgent problem of shock waves, which is beginning to provide a Some Outstanding Features serious headache for the aerodynamicist. These are dealt with in an One of the most interesting features of this issue is perhaps the informative article introducing the reader to the physical concepts underlying the purely mathematical aspect of the subject with which explanation of the ingenious system developed during the many of them are already familiar. late war, for the benefit of diluted personnel, of classifying

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Aug 1, 1946

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