An assessment of professional training for product managers in the pharmaceutical industry

An assessment of professional training for product managers in the pharmaceutical industry Purpose – The primary purpose of this study is to identify how and where product managers in the pharmaceutical industry receive the training required to undertake their job tasks, and whether or not there is a relationship between the tasks they perform and the training they receive. Design/methodology/approach – The methodology for this study was exploratory and descriptive in nature, and utilized a cross‐sectional survey design. Both descriptive and relational statistics are used to analyze the data. Findings – The key findings reveal that product managers receive the majority of their training on the job, with the rest supported by company‐sponsored training and outside seminars. Product managers do not appear to receive company training in proportion to the frequency with which particular tasks are performed. Research limitations/implications – The limitations to the study are that the findings are limited to one industry and that training needs are self‐reported. Originality/value – Managers should not assume that on the job training adequately prepares product managers to do their jobs properly, and training should be an essential part of the product manager's experience. The paper identifies specific areas for future training. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Product & Brand Management Emerald Publishing

An assessment of professional training for product managers in the pharmaceutical industry

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1061-0421
DOI
10.1108/10610420610685721
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – The primary purpose of this study is to identify how and where product managers in the pharmaceutical industry receive the training required to undertake their job tasks, and whether or not there is a relationship between the tasks they perform and the training they receive. Design/methodology/approach – The methodology for this study was exploratory and descriptive in nature, and utilized a cross‐sectional survey design. Both descriptive and relational statistics are used to analyze the data. Findings – The key findings reveal that product managers receive the majority of their training on the job, with the rest supported by company‐sponsored training and outside seminars. Product managers do not appear to receive company training in proportion to the frequency with which particular tasks are performed. Research limitations/implications – The limitations to the study are that the findings are limited to one industry and that training needs are self‐reported. Originality/value – Managers should not assume that on the job training adequately prepares product managers to do their jobs properly, and training should be an essential part of the product manager's experience. The paper identifies specific areas for future training.

Journal

Journal of Product & Brand ManagementEmerald Publishing

Published: Aug 1, 2006

Keywords: Pharmaceuticals industry; Marketing; Product management; Training needs; Training methods

References

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