Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

An analysis of e‐Government research published in Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy ( TGPPP )

An analysis of e‐Government research published in Transforming Government: People, Process and... Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to analyse the first two years of e‐Government research published in the Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy ( TGPPP ) from 2007 to 2008. Design/methodology/approach – Employing a profiling approach the analysis of the 41 e‐Government publications includes examining variables such as most productive authors, universities associated with the most publications, geographic diversity, authors' backgrounds, co‐author analysis, and research methods. Findings – The analytical, descriptive, theoretical and conceptual methods were the most dominant research approaches utilized by TGPPP authors within the last two years. Another fact that emerged is that the largest number of contributions comes from those with an information systems background, followed by business and computer science and IT. Originality/value – The primary value of this paper lies in extending the understanding of evolution and patterns of e‐Government research. This has been achieved by analyzing and synthesising existing TGPPP publications. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy Emerald Publishing

An analysis of e‐Government research published in Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy ( TGPPP )

Loading next page...
 
/lp/emerald-publishing/an-analysis-of-e-government-research-published-in-transforming-cwHPBhUUMx
Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1750-6166
DOI
10.1108/17506160910940704
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to analyse the first two years of e‐Government research published in the Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy ( TGPPP ) from 2007 to 2008. Design/methodology/approach – Employing a profiling approach the analysis of the 41 e‐Government publications includes examining variables such as most productive authors, universities associated with the most publications, geographic diversity, authors' backgrounds, co‐author analysis, and research methods. Findings – The analytical, descriptive, theoretical and conceptual methods were the most dominant research approaches utilized by TGPPP authors within the last two years. Another fact that emerged is that the largest number of contributions comes from those with an information systems background, followed by business and computer science and IT. Originality/value – The primary value of this paper lies in extending the understanding of evolution and patterns of e‐Government research. This has been achieved by analyzing and synthesising existing TGPPP publications.

Journal

Transforming Government: People, Process and PolicyEmerald Publishing

Published: Mar 20, 2009

Keywords: Government; Communication technologies; Research; Publications

References