American crafts shows: price or style conscious?

American crafts shows: price or style conscious? Purpose – This paper aims to provide a classification for the process by which crafters find appropriate consumers in the post‐modern market structure that exists between black or gray markets where illegal or illegally obtained goods are sold, and the markets that serve the Fordist, mass‐production, mass‐distribution portion of an economy. Design/methodology/approach – Principally the research was done via personal interviews and visits to craft show sites and comparing the findings to the existing street‐market structures of Europe. Findings – The institutions that have evolved to support market segregation/segmentation in crafts markets are interesting and are better understood within a classification system like the one developed here. How these institutions differ from the street‐market culture of Europe lends an insight into this uniquely American post‐modern market system. Research limitations/implications – This study is the beginning of a larger body of work that should be undertaken to better comprehend how the increasing post‐modern market structure is interacting with and occasionally replacing, the traditional market structures in the USA. Practical implications – As the post‐modern market structure becomes more prevalent in the USA understanding how it is similar to and differs from, the comparable market structures in Europe is important to policy decisions on the local level, particularly with respect to local support of this type of market. Originality/value – This work extends earlier work looking at farmers’ markets into the crafts market environment. As such it brings the overall understanding of the post‐modern market structure in to more clear focus. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy Emerald Publishing

American crafts shows: price or style conscious?

Loading next page...
 
/lp/emerald-publishing/american-crafts-shows-price-or-style-conscious-cjTW90nRqb
Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0144-333X
DOI
10.1108/01443330610680425
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – This paper aims to provide a classification for the process by which crafters find appropriate consumers in the post‐modern market structure that exists between black or gray markets where illegal or illegally obtained goods are sold, and the markets that serve the Fordist, mass‐production, mass‐distribution portion of an economy. Design/methodology/approach – Principally the research was done via personal interviews and visits to craft show sites and comparing the findings to the existing street‐market structures of Europe. Findings – The institutions that have evolved to support market segregation/segmentation in crafts markets are interesting and are better understood within a classification system like the one developed here. How these institutions differ from the street‐market culture of Europe lends an insight into this uniquely American post‐modern market system. Research limitations/implications – This study is the beginning of a larger body of work that should be undertaken to better comprehend how the increasing post‐modern market structure is interacting with and occasionally replacing, the traditional market structures in the USA. Practical implications – As the post‐modern market structure becomes more prevalent in the USA understanding how it is similar to and differs from, the comparable market structures in Europe is important to policy decisions on the local level, particularly with respect to local support of this type of market. Originality/value – This work extends earlier work looking at farmers’ markets into the crafts market environment. As such it brings the overall understanding of the post‐modern market structure in to more clear focus.

Journal

International Journal of Sociology and Social PolicyEmerald Publishing

Published: Jul 1, 2006

Keywords: Crafts; Craft production; Postmodernism

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off