Age does not come alone: Identifying and implementing older people's views of quality in home care services

Age does not come alone: Identifying and implementing older people's views of quality in home... This paper describes a study that explored older people's views and priorities on what made for quality in home care services, ways of accessing these and enabling them to become part of mainstream service monitoring. It took place in a city in the north of England, in 2000. The research was funded by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation. Older people's definitions of a quality home care service go outside the service boundaries that are set by social service departments who define the quality specifications for home care services and commission them. Older people had a joined‐up perspective of what contributes to quality in a home care service including, for example, in their definitions of a quality service: access to transport to get out of the house, aids, adaptations and health care. They emphasised the importance of domestic help, which has been reported in other studies. To obtain information on their definitions of a quality service older people were offered the choice of a home‐based interview or participation in a focus group. Following the collection of the data on quality a round table discussion was arranged. The purpose of this was to explore how older people's views on the quality of home care services could become part of routine monitoring, to shape further development and assist in commissioning. Older people who had participated in the first part of the study were invited to attend this, as were local commissioners, service providers and elected members with executive responsibility for older people's services. The recommendations of this round table are discussed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Quality in Ageing and Older Adults Emerald Publishing

Age does not come alone: Identifying and implementing older people's views of quality in home care services

Loading next page...
 
/lp/emerald-publishing/age-does-not-come-alone-identifying-and-implementing-older-people-s-Gd4n27enby
Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1471-7794
DOI
10.1108/14717794200400004
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This paper describes a study that explored older people's views and priorities on what made for quality in home care services, ways of accessing these and enabling them to become part of mainstream service monitoring. It took place in a city in the north of England, in 2000. The research was funded by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation. Older people's definitions of a quality home care service go outside the service boundaries that are set by social service departments who define the quality specifications for home care services and commission them. Older people had a joined‐up perspective of what contributes to quality in a home care service including, for example, in their definitions of a quality service: access to transport to get out of the house, aids, adaptations and health care. They emphasised the importance of domestic help, which has been reported in other studies. To obtain information on their definitions of a quality service older people were offered the choice of a home‐based interview or participation in a focus group. Following the collection of the data on quality a round table discussion was arranged. The purpose of this was to explore how older people's views on the quality of home care services could become part of routine monitoring, to shape further development and assist in commissioning. Older people who had participated in the first part of the study were invited to attend this, as were local commissioners, service providers and elected members with executive responsibility for older people's services. The recommendations of this round table are discussed.

Journal

Quality in Ageing and Older AdultsEmerald Publishing

Published: Jun 1, 2004

Keywords: Older people; Quality; Home care services; Methods for accessing views; Round table forum

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off