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AeroElastic Problems

AeroElastic Problems Aircraft Engineering TH E MONTHLY ORGAN OF THE AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING PROFESSION VOL XXVI No 307 SEPTEMBER 1954 S.B.A.C. DISPLAY • FARNBOROUGH • SEPTEMBER 6—12 • STAND NO. 198 The nature of the problem having led to the use of computers, it becomes necessary to adapt methods of calculation to make the best HE subject of aero-elasticity, and in particular flutter, which use of the equipment, and conversely, to consider how far the use of is its largest and most complex branch, is one which the non- computers will permit extension of existing methods to cover a wider Tspecialist approaches with trepidation. Today, however, a range of conditions, or to give a higher degree of accuracy. The first large proportion of the design and development effort on any air­ consideration, however, is the expansion of the computing capacity craft, and to a particularly high degree on high-performance aircraft, of the country. It is a sobering thought that, as pointed out by M R has to be devoted to the solutions of flutter problems, which can so SHEVLOFF, adequate computing resources might have made possible easily be the source of sudden and catastrophic failure in the air. It is calculations which would have prevented the loss of more than one therefore desirable that the understanding of the fundamentals of prototype aircraft, with attendant loss of life, and all the delay the subject should not be confined to the specialists in the field, and involved. with this in mind we have in the past few months devoted a consider­ able amount of space to expositions of the theory and practice of the work of flutter and vibration departments, intended to provide the reader with general engineering knowledge with some understanding Aerodynamic Derivatives of the subject, and to give students who may later specialize in it an Another problem which arises in the flutter calculations is the introduction to the principles. necessity for accurate knowledge of a large number of aerodynamic The series The Elementary Theory of Aero-Elasticity, by E. G. derivatives both for steady and oscillating conditions. A further com­ BROADBENT, which is now available in monograph form, covers the plication arises with wings of very low aspect ratio, as in delta air­ fundamentals of established flutter practice, as it has grown up around craft, where the air loading on the wing may be expected to alter the the aircraft without large angles of sweep-back, and with wings of aerofoil cross section appreciably, and so influence its aerodynamic appreciable aspect ratio, that were usual until recently. Some con­ properties. There is thus an urgent need for research to provide sideration is given to the extension of the classical methods to the knowledge of aerodynamic derivatives for these low-aspect ratio problems of the most modern aircraft, but a full treatment would wings at high speeds, subsonic and supersonic, in order that the take the series beyond the intended scope. Two other contributions aerodynamic information in the flutter equations may match in to the wider diffusion of understanding of the flutter department's accuracy the structural data. Research into these problems is, of work are the papers presented to the Royal Aeronautical Society by course, being carried out, but, as always, the work was not begun MR N. P. SHEVLOFF, on 'The Evaluation of Flutter Characteristics until the results were needed, and so the delay is bound to be con­ in Design', and D R D. WILLIAMS on 'Developments in the Structural siderable. Approach to Aero-Elastic Problems'. These papers are reproduced in the August and in the present issues respectively. Production Survey Computing Equipment A study of these articles reveals that the subject can, in fact, be In this issue, which is to be available at the time of the S.B.A.C. broken down into elements which are not difficult to understand Display at Farnborough, we are again, as in the past two years, and that the fearsome appearance of many of the works on the publishing an article which gives a general survey of progress in subject is due mainly to the use of unfamiliar notations, and to the aviation during the period since the war. This year the subject is large number of elements which have to be considered if a reasonably Production, and the author PROFESSOR J. V. CONNOLLY, Head of the close approximation to the true behaviour of so complex a structure Department of Aircraft Economics and Production at the College of as the modern aircraft is to be obtained. It is this factor of the Aeronautics, Cranfield. In this article the various available tech­ number of structural elements or stations which so prolongs the niques and processes of particular interest to the aircraft industry are evaluation of the expressions, and which makes the use of computing drawn together, with some assessment of their capacities and future equipment so desirable. Indeed, in the near future it is to be expected possibilities. It is becoming clear that the development of production that computers will be recognized as necessities, and that more air­ processes is going to be increasingly dependent on fundamental craft firms will follow those which have installed their own equip­ research, and that the future will show a closer relationship between ment so as to be independent of the capacity available at the National the manner in which production techniques are developed, and that Physical Laboratory and elsewhere, for which there may be a con­ associated with design problems, and indeed with scientific advance siderable waiting list. in general. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

AeroElastic Problems

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 26 (9): 1 – Sep 1, 1954

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb032465
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Aircraft Engineering TH E MONTHLY ORGAN OF THE AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING PROFESSION VOL XXVI No 307 SEPTEMBER 1954 S.B.A.C. DISPLAY • FARNBOROUGH • SEPTEMBER 6—12 • STAND NO. 198 The nature of the problem having led to the use of computers, it becomes necessary to adapt methods of calculation to make the best HE subject of aero-elasticity, and in particular flutter, which use of the equipment, and conversely, to consider how far the use of is its largest and most complex branch, is one which the non- computers will permit extension of existing methods to cover a wider Tspecialist approaches with trepidation. Today, however, a range of conditions, or to give a higher degree of accuracy. The first large proportion of the design and development effort on any air­ consideration, however, is the expansion of the computing capacity craft, and to a particularly high degree on high-performance aircraft, of the country. It is a sobering thought that, as pointed out by M R has to be devoted to the solutions of flutter problems, which can so SHEVLOFF, adequate computing resources might have made possible easily be the source of sudden and catastrophic failure in the air. It is calculations which would have prevented the loss of more than one therefore desirable that the understanding of the fundamentals of prototype aircraft, with attendant loss of life, and all the delay the subject should not be confined to the specialists in the field, and involved. with this in mind we have in the past few months devoted a consider­ able amount of space to expositions of the theory and practice of the work of flutter and vibration departments, intended to provide the reader with general engineering knowledge with some understanding Aerodynamic Derivatives of the subject, and to give students who may later specialize in it an Another problem which arises in the flutter calculations is the introduction to the principles. necessity for accurate knowledge of a large number of aerodynamic The series The Elementary Theory of Aero-Elasticity, by E. G. derivatives both for steady and oscillating conditions. A further com­ BROADBENT, which is now available in monograph form, covers the plication arises with wings of very low aspect ratio, as in delta air­ fundamentals of established flutter practice, as it has grown up around craft, where the air loading on the wing may be expected to alter the the aircraft without large angles of sweep-back, and with wings of aerofoil cross section appreciably, and so influence its aerodynamic appreciable aspect ratio, that were usual until recently. Some con­ properties. There is thus an urgent need for research to provide sideration is given to the extension of the classical methods to the knowledge of aerodynamic derivatives for these low-aspect ratio problems of the most modern aircraft, but a full treatment would wings at high speeds, subsonic and supersonic, in order that the take the series beyond the intended scope. Two other contributions aerodynamic information in the flutter equations may match in to the wider diffusion of understanding of the flutter department's accuracy the structural data. Research into these problems is, of work are the papers presented to the Royal Aeronautical Society by course, being carried out, but, as always, the work was not begun MR N. P. SHEVLOFF, on 'The Evaluation of Flutter Characteristics until the results were needed, and so the delay is bound to be con­ in Design', and D R D. WILLIAMS on 'Developments in the Structural siderable. Approach to Aero-Elastic Problems'. These papers are reproduced in the August and in the present issues respectively. Production Survey Computing Equipment A study of these articles reveals that the subject can, in fact, be In this issue, which is to be available at the time of the S.B.A.C. broken down into elements which are not difficult to understand Display at Farnborough, we are again, as in the past two years, and that the fearsome appearance of many of the works on the publishing an article which gives a general survey of progress in subject is due mainly to the use of unfamiliar notations, and to the aviation during the period since the war. This year the subject is large number of elements which have to be considered if a reasonably Production, and the author PROFESSOR J. V. CONNOLLY, Head of the close approximation to the true behaviour of so complex a structure Department of Aircraft Economics and Production at the College of as the modern aircraft is to be obtained. It is this factor of the Aeronautics, Cranfield. In this article the various available tech­ number of structural elements or stations which so prolongs the niques and processes of particular interest to the aircraft industry are evaluation of the expressions, and which makes the use of computing drawn together, with some assessment of their capacities and future equipment so desirable. Indeed, in the near future it is to be expected possibilities. It is becoming clear that the development of production that computers will be recognized as necessities, and that more air­ processes is going to be increasingly dependent on fundamental craft firms will follow those which have installed their own equip­ research, and that the future will show a closer relationship between ment so as to be independent of the capacity available at the National the manner in which production techniques are developed, and that Physical Laboratory and elsewhere, for which there may be a con­ associated with design problems, and indeed with scientific advance siderable waiting list. in general.

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Sep 1, 1954

There are no references for this article.