Advanced finishing plant for farm equipment

Advanced finishing plant for farm equipment A NEW metal finishing plant of advanced design has been installed by United and General Engineering (Victoria) Co. Ltd., at the David Brown subsidiary of Harrison, McGregor and Guest Ltd., of Leigh, Lancashire, where farm implements and sheet metal assemblies of David Brown tractors are made. Its installation has obviated a production bottleneck—existing paint plant facilities were inadequate for rising output—and has been designed to cope with increases in production up to 100%. Units for treatment are loaded on hangers at 24 in. intervals on a continuous conveyor 1,750 ft. long which moves at a speed of 6 ft./min. This is a Fisher-Ludlow Flowlink conveyor which is powered by two ¾-h.p . motors with track-type driving units and Heenan-Froude electronic synchroniser. Each hanger takes a maximum of 60 lb. Items pass first through a seven-stage pretreatment lasting 13 min. 30 sec. The stages are:— (1) alkali clean in Pyroclean 433 at 140°-145°F; (2) cold water spray rinse; (3) hot water spray rinse at 120°F; (4) accelerated zinc phosphate wash in Bonderite 97T at 130°F; (5) cold water rinse; (6) passivation rinse in Parcolene No. 1 at 120°F; and (7) demineralised water mist rinse. From this the units pass into an oven directly fired with propane assisted ignition on oil of 35 sec. viscosity through twin Swirlomiser burners. Here they dry off for 10 min. at 250°F. Passing next along a 20 min. cooling loop in the conveyor, the 5% of atmospheric pressure and incoming air is warmed to units are individually inspected for satisfactory phosphating. 80°F before it passes through Vokes paper filters into the booth. Having passed inspection, they are conveyed into a slipper The sprayed work continues through a 9 min. flash-off enclosure dip tank of 2,850 gal. capacity to receive primer. The primer into the enamel oven, where it passes along a conveyor, including unit, one of the most impressive features of the new installation, vestibules, for 48 min. Of this period, 43 min. are spent in a incorporates a filter tank of 650 gal. capacity and dump tanks to a zone heated to between 270° and 280°F. A final length of total capacity of 5,000 gal. The primer, stoving alkyd primer conveyor delivers the finished work to the off-loading bay in to BS631 colour supplied by Robt. Ingham Clark, is con­ the despatch department where further inspection takes place. tinuously circulated by two Worthington Simpson pumps The paint used in the spray booth is Robt. Ingham Clark's through the dump, filter and slipper tanks. Total volume of 365 quality hot-spray enamel, which is fed to four different paint in circulation at any time is 4,300 gal. spray points for the four different colours of enamel used on From the dip tank the units pass along drainage loops in various versions of David Brown tractors. Both primer and the conveyor for 20 min. before entering the primer oven for enamels are piped to the work points on closed-circuit mains 58 min., 50 min. of which the items are exposed to a heat of from the paint preparation room, which is equipped with six 370°F. The oven is indirectly fired with oil of 600 sec. viscosity pairs of kettles, each of 75 gal. capacity. The enamel is heated through two Monarch units. in Bede Economatic units (red to 160°F and other colours to After this stage and during subsequent travel of 20 min. 170°F). round the flatting area, items for despatch in primer state can A fully equipped laboratory, for retaining control of incoming be off-loaded. The remainder continue their journey to the materials and accelerated testing of end products, is located spray booth. This is in two sections, each 20 ft. in length, nearby. with opposed wet walls. Both sections are pressurised at May 1965 CORROSION TECHNOLOGY http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials Emerald Publishing

Advanced finishing plant for farm equipment

Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials, Volume 12 (5): 1 – May 1, 1965

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0003-5599
DOI
10.1108/eb044066
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A NEW metal finishing plant of advanced design has been installed by United and General Engineering (Victoria) Co. Ltd., at the David Brown subsidiary of Harrison, McGregor and Guest Ltd., of Leigh, Lancashire, where farm implements and sheet metal assemblies of David Brown tractors are made. Its installation has obviated a production bottleneck—existing paint plant facilities were inadequate for rising output—and has been designed to cope with increases in production up to 100%. Units for treatment are loaded on hangers at 24 in. intervals on a continuous conveyor 1,750 ft. long which moves at a speed of 6 ft./min. This is a Fisher-Ludlow Flowlink conveyor which is powered by two ¾-h.p . motors with track-type driving units and Heenan-Froude electronic synchroniser. Each hanger takes a maximum of 60 lb. Items pass first through a seven-stage pretreatment lasting 13 min. 30 sec. The stages are:— (1) alkali clean in Pyroclean 433 at 140°-145°F; (2) cold water spray rinse; (3) hot water spray rinse at 120°F; (4) accelerated zinc phosphate wash in Bonderite 97T at 130°F; (5) cold water rinse; (6) passivation rinse in Parcolene No. 1 at 120°F; and (7) demineralised water mist rinse. From this the units pass into an oven directly fired with propane assisted ignition on oil of 35 sec. viscosity through twin Swirlomiser burners. Here they dry off for 10 min. at 250°F. Passing next along a 20 min. cooling loop in the conveyor, the 5% of atmospheric pressure and incoming air is warmed to units are individually inspected for satisfactory phosphating. 80°F before it passes through Vokes paper filters into the booth. Having passed inspection, they are conveyed into a slipper The sprayed work continues through a 9 min. flash-off enclosure dip tank of 2,850 gal. capacity to receive primer. The primer into the enamel oven, where it passes along a conveyor, including unit, one of the most impressive features of the new installation, vestibules, for 48 min. Of this period, 43 min. are spent in a incorporates a filter tank of 650 gal. capacity and dump tanks to a zone heated to between 270° and 280°F. A final length of total capacity of 5,000 gal. The primer, stoving alkyd primer conveyor delivers the finished work to the off-loading bay in to BS631 colour supplied by Robt. Ingham Clark, is con­ the despatch department where further inspection takes place. tinuously circulated by two Worthington Simpson pumps The paint used in the spray booth is Robt. Ingham Clark's through the dump, filter and slipper tanks. Total volume of 365 quality hot-spray enamel, which is fed to four different paint in circulation at any time is 4,300 gal. spray points for the four different colours of enamel used on From the dip tank the units pass along drainage loops in various versions of David Brown tractors. Both primer and the conveyor for 20 min. before entering the primer oven for enamels are piped to the work points on closed-circuit mains 58 min., 50 min. of which the items are exposed to a heat of from the paint preparation room, which is equipped with six 370°F. The oven is indirectly fired with oil of 600 sec. viscosity pairs of kettles, each of 75 gal. capacity. The enamel is heated through two Monarch units. in Bede Economatic units (red to 160°F and other colours to After this stage and during subsequent travel of 20 min. 170°F). round the flatting area, items for despatch in primer state can A fully equipped laboratory, for retaining control of incoming be off-loaded. The remainder continue their journey to the materials and accelerated testing of end products, is located spray booth. This is in two sections, each 20 ft. in length, nearby. with opposed wet walls. Both sections are pressurised at May 1965 CORROSION TECHNOLOGY

Journal

Anti-Corrosion Methods and MaterialsEmerald Publishing

Published: May 1, 1965

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