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Adding service means adding knowledge: an inductive single-case study

Adding service means adding knowledge: an inductive single-case study Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore how knowledge management systems can support the adoption of the servitization strategy in a manufacturing firm. Design/methodology/approach – In order to reach the paper aim, an inductive single-case study has been adopted. The analysis focuses on the IBM Corporation. Findings – In spite of the paucity of studies that simultaneously address both servitization and knowledge management topics, the case study findings show five connections points between the two streams of research, proving not only that they are closely connected to each other, but also how the adoption of a good knowledge management system can facilitate the implementation of a servitization strategy. Research limitations/implications – As far as the adoption of a single-case study is concerned, this could create biases that can affect the final product in terms of reliability, validity, and generalizability. However, as stated by Erickson (1986), the general lies in the particular and, as argued by Flyvbjerg (2006), the strength of a single example is underestimated in its contribution to scientific progress. Thus, even though this paper is based on a single-case study, it is reasonable to believe that it could be considered as a representative case of companies of the time and its findings sufficiently generalizable. Practical implications – Case study findings could guide managers towards understanding if their knowledge management tools and practices are appropriate, or if they need to be modified in order to successfully implement the servitization strategy adopted. Originality/value – This study represents the first attempt to fill the paucity of studies contemporaneously addressing both servitization and knowledge management topics, and could be used as a pilot case for future research works. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Business Process Management Journal Emerald Publishing

Adding service means adding knowledge: an inductive single-case study

Business Process Management Journal , Volume 21 (3): 18 – Jun 1, 2015

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
1463-7154
DOI
10.1108/BPMJ-07-2014-0063
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore how knowledge management systems can support the adoption of the servitization strategy in a manufacturing firm. Design/methodology/approach – In order to reach the paper aim, an inductive single-case study has been adopted. The analysis focuses on the IBM Corporation. Findings – In spite of the paucity of studies that simultaneously address both servitization and knowledge management topics, the case study findings show five connections points between the two streams of research, proving not only that they are closely connected to each other, but also how the adoption of a good knowledge management system can facilitate the implementation of a servitization strategy. Research limitations/implications – As far as the adoption of a single-case study is concerned, this could create biases that can affect the final product in terms of reliability, validity, and generalizability. However, as stated by Erickson (1986), the general lies in the particular and, as argued by Flyvbjerg (2006), the strength of a single example is underestimated in its contribution to scientific progress. Thus, even though this paper is based on a single-case study, it is reasonable to believe that it could be considered as a representative case of companies of the time and its findings sufficiently generalizable. Practical implications – Case study findings could guide managers towards understanding if their knowledge management tools and practices are appropriate, or if they need to be modified in order to successfully implement the servitization strategy adopted. Originality/value – This study represents the first attempt to fill the paucity of studies contemporaneously addressing both servitization and knowledge management topics, and could be used as a pilot case for future research works.

Journal

Business Process Management JournalEmerald Publishing

Published: Jun 1, 2015

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