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Adapted dialectical behaviour therapy skills group service evaluation

Adapted dialectical behaviour therapy skills group service evaluation The purpose of this paper is to determine the effectiveness of an adapted dialectical behaviour therapy (DBT) treatment programme for individuals with an intellectual disability, via completion of a service evaluation.Design/methodology/approachOutcome measurements were competed at pre-, post- and 12 months follow-up, and the effectiveness of the intervention was assessed using a Friedman analysis.FindingsFindings demonstrated that the treatment group showed significant differences in their “psychological distress” scores, but no significant differences were found in their “psychological well-being”, “anxiety” or “quality of life” (WHO-QOL) scores over time.Originality/valueOverall, the current study adds to the small but growing literature that supports using the skills training group part of DBT as a stand-alone psychological intervention when working with people with an intellectual disability. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities Emerald Publishing

Adapted dialectical behaviour therapy skills group service evaluation

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
© Emerald Publishing Limited
ISSN
2044-1282
DOI
10.1108/amhid-06-2020-0015
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to determine the effectiveness of an adapted dialectical behaviour therapy (DBT) treatment programme for individuals with an intellectual disability, via completion of a service evaluation.Design/methodology/approachOutcome measurements were competed at pre-, post- and 12 months follow-up, and the effectiveness of the intervention was assessed using a Friedman analysis.FindingsFindings demonstrated that the treatment group showed significant differences in their “psychological distress” scores, but no significant differences were found in their “psychological well-being”, “anxiety” or “quality of life” (WHO-QOL) scores over time.Originality/valueOverall, the current study adds to the small but growing literature that supports using the skills training group part of DBT as a stand-alone psychological intervention when working with people with an intellectual disability.

Journal

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual DisabilitiesEmerald Publishing

Published: Feb 16, 2021

Keywords: Learning disability; Intellectual disability; Service evaluation; DBT; Friedman analysis; Skills group

References