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Ablutions et al.

Ablutions et al. Aircraft Engineering THE MONTHLY SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL ORGAN OF THE AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING PROFESSION VOL XXIII No 273 NOVEMBER 1951 the scheme it is undeniable that a great amount of intelligent thought is being devoted to the subject and it has attained a prominent HE ramifications of aeroplane design are infinite and various place among the intellectual exercises that appeal to the more uncon­ and we have another instance of the catholicity of knowledge ventional minds in the aeronautical world. This is, of course, all to required, in the article which starts on the next page on the the good; since a great deal of the earlier romance has deserted the design requirements of a water system installed in a modern science in recent years and aeroplane design has tended to become air liner. rather a humdrum affair—as indeed might be said of the subject with which we are at the moment mainly concerned. It is difficult Special Circumstances for even the most earnest seeker after romance to find it in wash­ The peculiar circumstances involved necessitate the study of all basins, vital as these are to the comfort of passengers. sorts of considerations of a much more complex nature than the simple problems which confront the designer of similar amenities A Precedent in a train, or even a ship—quite apart from the ever-present aircraft bugbear of the need for saving weight. Rapid changes in altitude, in Reverting to this matter of water systems, we are struck, as we so the attitude of the aeroplane and high rates of acceleration and, to often have been in connexion with other subjects, with the apparent a lesser extent perhaps, of deceleration all have to be borne in mind lack of a historical sense among those who are faced with a problem in designing the tankage and piping for water supplies. The mere which is to them new. On the question of water recovery from fact of penetration to heights of 25,000 feet and upwards, involving engine exhaust gases MESSRS CUMBERLAND AND BOWEY seem to the use of pressurized cabins, also means that no change in the imply that the subject first arose in relation to the provision of water atmospheric conditions within the aeroplane must be brought about for injection to obtain a momentary extra boost of power in fighter by the opening of a discharge outlet; which must therefore be fitted aeroplanes. In point of fact, however, very extensive researches, with a non-return valve. accompanied by quite a number of practical experiments were carried This question of waste is one, indeed, which has all sorts of out in 1917 and 1918 by the Technical Staff of the British Airship pitfalls; such as the necessity of ensuring that there is a negative Service—and, we believe, more or less contemporaneously by the Zeppelin Company in Germany. The object then was to find some pressure at the outlets for reasons which now seem obvious but method of replacement of ballast discharged from airships during which were not so in the early days of aircraft, with the result that flight. So far as our recollection goes the decision reached was much failure to foresee the requirement gave rise on occasion to em­ barrassing situations. the same as that arrived as a result of the more recent investigations —that the complications and weight involved offered no real advantage over the less attractive method of carrying the estimated Folklore amount of water required for the projected flight from the start. Another matter that has comparatively recently been dealt with WING-COMMANDER T. R. CAVE-BROWNE-CAVE, now at Southampton by A.R.B. regulations is the leading of water away from the aircraft University, who was in charge of the airship research work on the on discharge in such a way that it cannot make its ultimate departure subject could no doubt, if asked, produce the data that became in the form of lumps of ice. It will be remembered that last winter available thirty years ago. On the alternative proposal, recirculating quite a mystery at one time bade fair to develop over the discovery a more limited quantity of water after filtration and sterilization, we by various bewildered individuals of lumps of ice lying about on the cannot but agree with the authors that, whatever the possibilities in countryside. Coming as it did about the same time as the scare of the this direction may be, it is not an idea that would commend itself appearance of 'flying saucers' in various parts of the World— to passengers—if they knew. predominantly in America—there seemed quite a possibility of the Among the many minor problems that crop up is that dealing with building up of a charming legend on Wellsian lines until the true the condensation on the inner surface ofthe airframe that arises from source of their phenomena, discharges. from the waste-pipes of flying at height. We only pick this out for mention as an instance passing aeroplanes, was identified—fortunately perhaps for the of the kind of problem peculiar to aircraft that develops when deal­ BRITISH INTERPLANETARY SOCIETY who at one time seemed likely to ing with a matter, such as this of the provision of water supplies, be involved. that is basically one that is already familiar to those engaged in other branches of engineering. In Parentheses The recent discussions of this body on various aspects of the An Analogy development of artificial satellites or orbital space vehicles are, we are afraid somewhat belatedly, also reported in this issue; in view of Incidentally, the nearest approach, we suppose, to the aeroplane which we trust that its members will forgive our mild pleasantry at in this connexion would be the submarine, where somewhat similar their expense. Whatever view one may take of the practicability of practical difficulties have to be overcome. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

Ablutions et al.

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 23 (11): 1 – Nov 1, 1951

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb032096
Publisher site
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Abstract

Aircraft Engineering THE MONTHLY SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL ORGAN OF THE AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING PROFESSION VOL XXIII No 273 NOVEMBER 1951 the scheme it is undeniable that a great amount of intelligent thought is being devoted to the subject and it has attained a prominent HE ramifications of aeroplane design are infinite and various place among the intellectual exercises that appeal to the more uncon­ and we have another instance of the catholicity of knowledge ventional minds in the aeronautical world. This is, of course, all to required, in the article which starts on the next page on the the good; since a great deal of the earlier romance has deserted the design requirements of a water system installed in a modern science in recent years and aeroplane design has tended to become air liner. rather a humdrum affair—as indeed might be said of the subject with which we are at the moment mainly concerned. It is difficult Special Circumstances for even the most earnest seeker after romance to find it in wash­ The peculiar circumstances involved necessitate the study of all basins, vital as these are to the comfort of passengers. sorts of considerations of a much more complex nature than the simple problems which confront the designer of similar amenities A Precedent in a train, or even a ship—quite apart from the ever-present aircraft bugbear of the need for saving weight. Rapid changes in altitude, in Reverting to this matter of water systems, we are struck, as we so the attitude of the aeroplane and high rates of acceleration and, to often have been in connexion with other subjects, with the apparent a lesser extent perhaps, of deceleration all have to be borne in mind lack of a historical sense among those who are faced with a problem in designing the tankage and piping for water supplies. The mere which is to them new. On the question of water recovery from fact of penetration to heights of 25,000 feet and upwards, involving engine exhaust gases MESSRS CUMBERLAND AND BOWEY seem to the use of pressurized cabins, also means that no change in the imply that the subject first arose in relation to the provision of water atmospheric conditions within the aeroplane must be brought about for injection to obtain a momentary extra boost of power in fighter by the opening of a discharge outlet; which must therefore be fitted aeroplanes. In point of fact, however, very extensive researches, with a non-return valve. accompanied by quite a number of practical experiments were carried This question of waste is one, indeed, which has all sorts of out in 1917 and 1918 by the Technical Staff of the British Airship pitfalls; such as the necessity of ensuring that there is a negative Service—and, we believe, more or less contemporaneously by the Zeppelin Company in Germany. The object then was to find some pressure at the outlets for reasons which now seem obvious but method of replacement of ballast discharged from airships during which were not so in the early days of aircraft, with the result that flight. So far as our recollection goes the decision reached was much failure to foresee the requirement gave rise on occasion to em­ barrassing situations. the same as that arrived as a result of the more recent investigations —that the complications and weight involved offered no real advantage over the less attractive method of carrying the estimated Folklore amount of water required for the projected flight from the start. Another matter that has comparatively recently been dealt with WING-COMMANDER T. R. CAVE-BROWNE-CAVE, now at Southampton by A.R.B. regulations is the leading of water away from the aircraft University, who was in charge of the airship research work on the on discharge in such a way that it cannot make its ultimate departure subject could no doubt, if asked, produce the data that became in the form of lumps of ice. It will be remembered that last winter available thirty years ago. On the alternative proposal, recirculating quite a mystery at one time bade fair to develop over the discovery a more limited quantity of water after filtration and sterilization, we by various bewildered individuals of lumps of ice lying about on the cannot but agree with the authors that, whatever the possibilities in countryside. Coming as it did about the same time as the scare of the this direction may be, it is not an idea that would commend itself appearance of 'flying saucers' in various parts of the World— to passengers—if they knew. predominantly in America—there seemed quite a possibility of the Among the many minor problems that crop up is that dealing with building up of a charming legend on Wellsian lines until the true the condensation on the inner surface ofthe airframe that arises from source of their phenomena, discharges. from the waste-pipes of flying at height. We only pick this out for mention as an instance passing aeroplanes, was identified—fortunately perhaps for the of the kind of problem peculiar to aircraft that develops when deal­ BRITISH INTERPLANETARY SOCIETY who at one time seemed likely to ing with a matter, such as this of the provision of water supplies, be involved. that is basically one that is already familiar to those engaged in other branches of engineering. In Parentheses The recent discussions of this body on various aspects of the An Analogy development of artificial satellites or orbital space vehicles are, we are afraid somewhat belatedly, also reported in this issue; in view of Incidentally, the nearest approach, we suppose, to the aeroplane which we trust that its members will forgive our mild pleasantry at in this connexion would be the submarine, where somewhat similar their expense. Whatever view one may take of the practicability of practical difficulties have to be overcome.

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Nov 1, 1951

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