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A yarning place in narrative histories

A yarning place in narrative histories In this article I will first explore current research definitions, uses and roles of yarning. From this I will argue yarning is undervalued and underutilised as a potentially rich source of data collection. Second, I will discuss how yarning can be used in research design development, application and data collection. Last, I will use my research in the history of education to demonstrate the effectiveness of yarning in historical narratives, in particular my study of an Aboriginal community’s journey towards Aboriginal student integration in Collarenebri, a small, remote and rural town, in northern New South Wales (NSW). I show how the local Aboriginal community lobbied successfully for their children to be transferred from a segregated Annex to the main school during the mid 1940s to the early 1950s. Utilising yarning as a research methodology added depth and relevance for participants, their local communities and the narrative paradigm that informs it. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png History of Education Review Emerald Publishing

A yarning place in narrative histories

History of Education Review , Volume 39 (2): 8 – Oct 14, 2010

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2010 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0819-8691
DOI
10.1108/08198691201000005
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In this article I will first explore current research definitions, uses and roles of yarning. From this I will argue yarning is undervalued and underutilised as a potentially rich source of data collection. Second, I will discuss how yarning can be used in research design development, application and data collection. Last, I will use my research in the history of education to demonstrate the effectiveness of yarning in historical narratives, in particular my study of an Aboriginal community’s journey towards Aboriginal student integration in Collarenebri, a small, remote and rural town, in northern New South Wales (NSW). I show how the local Aboriginal community lobbied successfully for their children to be transferred from a segregated Annex to the main school during the mid 1940s to the early 1950s. Utilising yarning as a research methodology added depth and relevance for participants, their local communities and the narrative paradigm that informs it.

Journal

History of Education ReviewEmerald Publishing

Published: Oct 14, 2010

Keywords: Narrative history; Indigenous communities; Knowledge systems

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