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A University Wind Tunnel

A University Wind Tunnel 252 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING October, 1931 Th e Detroit Single-Return-Flow Open or Closed Experimenta l Chamber Tunnel Described By Rollin J. Fairbanks N E of the most recent wind tunnels built in experimenta l chamber. The energy rati o across the th e United States is tha t at the University je t is 20 . of Detroit, officially put into operation in Electri c balances are used to measure lift, drag, September , 1930, designed under the personal an d pitch forces, the conventional counterweights supervision of Professor Peter Altman, director of bein g used. These balances are located in a room th e aeronautical engineering department of the directl y over the experimental chamber, the floor of University . which is in the form of a grating to simplify the Occupying a separate building, 45 ft. wide by wiring u p of models preparator y t o testing an d give 125 ft. long b y 25 ft. high, to avoid trouble with a full view of the model under test. The balance noise vand ibration, this tunnel is of the roo m has plenty of light, being directly under a single-return-flow type, and has the added feature larg e skylight, and blackboards are conveniently of an experimental chamber tha t is convertible to arrange d in order tha t instruction may bo presented cithe r an open, closed, or partially closed section. graphicall y while tests are being made. A switch Thi s is made possible through the use of a set of enables th e operator to control the motor from this collapsible or folding walls which, when fully room. The balance is capable of automatic or assembled, enclose th e throat, and are so designed manua l operation and will measure forces up to tha t they may be set up without great difficulty 500 lb . in lift, 25 lb . in pitch and 25 lb . in yaw. an d in a relatively short time. Both jets are Powe r is furnished by a motor-generator set rectangula r in section, measuring 7·07 by 10 ft. which produces the direct current for the motor Th e outlet (suction) jet has a large curved edge drivin g the fan. The motor, which is mounted in which keeps the flow across the throat smooth and th e tunnel on stream-lined supports, is rated at practicall y eliminates any eddying of air in the 200 h.p., though 275 h.p. is available. Openings in tes t chamber. th e spinner provide for cooling. Wind speeds of Th e tunnel changes into a circular section a t the 12 t o 150 m.p.h. are obtainable. fan and then returns to its original rectangular B y enclosing the experimental chamber a better form. The return duct, which is about 15 ft. high, energy ratio results. Models of aircraft up to expand s in width as it leaves the fan, allowing a 6 ft. in span can be tested successfully, and it is reduction in the energy required to produce a given intende d to test airscrews when the necessary wind velocity across the test section, in comparison equipmen t can be obtained. It is also possible to wit h a tunnel of constant cross-sectional area. tes t models of motor-cars, radiators, buildings, etc., Ther e are two sets of cascades, or deflecting vanes, for air resistance and other factors. a t each end of the return passage, no honeycombs being used. Th e aeronautical department, which has been in Th e four-bladed fan is 16 ft. in diameter, and here, existence since September, 1921, an d has a n average owing to the expansion of the tunnel between of 375 students, also has a small tunnel, exactly th e throat and the section a t this point, a further one-twelfth the size of the large one, the throat reduction of energy is possible. The maximum being 7·07 b y 10 in. , used for elementary instruction. speed of the fan, between which and the tunnel Adjacen t to the large tunnel is a model shop which walls there is a clearance of only about ⅛ in., is is available t o commercial interests, a static testing room, an d a computing room ; the latte r is equipped abou t 1,140 r.p.m. A wire net about 3 ft. high is wit h blackboards and is used as a classroom where stretche d across the tunnel in front of the fan to graphica l explanations may be made to students protec t it against damage from objects which may an d the results of tests ma y be computed. accidentall y be drawn into the tunnel from the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

A University Wind Tunnel

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb029461
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

252 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING October, 1931 Th e Detroit Single-Return-Flow Open or Closed Experimenta l Chamber Tunnel Described By Rollin J. Fairbanks N E of the most recent wind tunnels built in experimenta l chamber. The energy rati o across the th e United States is tha t at the University je t is 20 . of Detroit, officially put into operation in Electri c balances are used to measure lift, drag, September , 1930, designed under the personal an d pitch forces, the conventional counterweights supervision of Professor Peter Altman, director of bein g used. These balances are located in a room th e aeronautical engineering department of the directl y over the experimental chamber, the floor of University . which is in the form of a grating to simplify the Occupying a separate building, 45 ft. wide by wiring u p of models preparator y t o testing an d give 125 ft. long b y 25 ft. high, to avoid trouble with a full view of the model under test. The balance noise vand ibration, this tunnel is of the roo m has plenty of light, being directly under a single-return-flow type, and has the added feature larg e skylight, and blackboards are conveniently of an experimental chamber tha t is convertible to arrange d in order tha t instruction may bo presented cithe r an open, closed, or partially closed section. graphicall y while tests are being made. A switch Thi s is made possible through the use of a set of enables th e operator to control the motor from this collapsible or folding walls which, when fully room. The balance is capable of automatic or assembled, enclose th e throat, and are so designed manua l operation and will measure forces up to tha t they may be set up without great difficulty 500 lb . in lift, 25 lb . in pitch and 25 lb . in yaw. an d in a relatively short time. Both jets are Powe r is furnished by a motor-generator set rectangula r in section, measuring 7·07 by 10 ft. which produces the direct current for the motor Th e outlet (suction) jet has a large curved edge drivin g the fan. The motor, which is mounted in which keeps the flow across the throat smooth and th e tunnel on stream-lined supports, is rated at practicall y eliminates any eddying of air in the 200 h.p., though 275 h.p. is available. Openings in tes t chamber. th e spinner provide for cooling. Wind speeds of Th e tunnel changes into a circular section a t the 12 t o 150 m.p.h. are obtainable. fan and then returns to its original rectangular B y enclosing the experimental chamber a better form. The return duct, which is about 15 ft. high, energy ratio results. Models of aircraft up to expand s in width as it leaves the fan, allowing a 6 ft. in span can be tested successfully, and it is reduction in the energy required to produce a given intende d to test airscrews when the necessary wind velocity across the test section, in comparison equipmen t can be obtained. It is also possible to wit h a tunnel of constant cross-sectional area. tes t models of motor-cars, radiators, buildings, etc., Ther e are two sets of cascades, or deflecting vanes, for air resistance and other factors. a t each end of the return passage, no honeycombs being used. Th e aeronautical department, which has been in Th e four-bladed fan is 16 ft. in diameter, and here, existence since September, 1921, an d has a n average owing to the expansion of the tunnel between of 375 students, also has a small tunnel, exactly th e throat and the section a t this point, a further one-twelfth the size of the large one, the throat reduction of energy is possible. The maximum being 7·07 b y 10 in. , used for elementary instruction. speed of the fan, between which and the tunnel Adjacen t to the large tunnel is a model shop which walls there is a clearance of only about ⅛ in., is is available t o commercial interests, a static testing room, an d a computing room ; the latte r is equipped abou t 1,140 r.p.m. A wire net about 3 ft. high is wit h blackboards and is used as a classroom where stretche d across the tunnel in front of the fan to graphica l explanations may be made to students protec t it against damage from objects which may an d the results of tests ma y be computed. accidentall y be drawn into the tunnel from the

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Oct 1, 1931

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