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A telehealth intervention for families caring for a child with traumatic brain injury (TBI)

A telehealth intervention for families caring for a child with traumatic brain injury (TBI) Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to determine the preliminary clinical utility of a telephone‐support format of the “Signposts” (Hudson et al. , 2003) behavioural intervention programme to be used with a paediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI) population. Design/methodology/approach – Nine families caring for a child with moderate or severe TBI, participated in a pilot study of a TBI adapted “Signposts for Building Better Behaviour” manualised programme. The programme is designed to help parents learn positive parenting skills and strategies that empower them to successfully manage their child's challenging behaviour post‐TBI. The programme consists of seven core sessions and two supplemental sessions. Parents work through the sessions with an accompaniment of guiding information booklets, a DVD with scenes modelling positive parenting strategies, and a workbook containing written exercises. At the completion of each session parents receive a telephone‐support call from a trained Signposts practitioner who provides assistance and feedback on programme content. Findings – On average parents completed eight sessions (range seven to nine) and every family completed the seven core sessions. Participation in the telephone‐support calls was high with 96 per cent of calls having been successfully received by families. All parents agreed that the telephone calls were a useful part of the programme and felt that the materials were helpful for managing challenging behaviour. Paired‐samples t ‐tests showed significant reductions for challenging behaviour from pre‐ to post‐intervention. Parenting practices also significantly improved over the course of the intervention. In general, parents rated a high level of consumer satisfaction with the Signposts programme and its content. Originality/value – Overall, these preliminary findings support the potential clinical utility of a telephone‐support version of the Signposts programme to improve parenting skills and to reduce challenging child behaviour following TBI. This study has provided the impetus for a larger clinical research trial to be conducted. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Social Care and Neurodisability Emerald Publishing

A telehealth intervention for families caring for a child with traumatic brain injury (TBI)

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
2042-0919
DOI
10.1108/SCN-01-2013-0002
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to determine the preliminary clinical utility of a telephone‐support format of the “Signposts” (Hudson et al. , 2003) behavioural intervention programme to be used with a paediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI) population. Design/methodology/approach – Nine families caring for a child with moderate or severe TBI, participated in a pilot study of a TBI adapted “Signposts for Building Better Behaviour” manualised programme. The programme is designed to help parents learn positive parenting skills and strategies that empower them to successfully manage their child's challenging behaviour post‐TBI. The programme consists of seven core sessions and two supplemental sessions. Parents work through the sessions with an accompaniment of guiding information booklets, a DVD with scenes modelling positive parenting strategies, and a workbook containing written exercises. At the completion of each session parents receive a telephone‐support call from a trained Signposts practitioner who provides assistance and feedback on programme content. Findings – On average parents completed eight sessions (range seven to nine) and every family completed the seven core sessions. Participation in the telephone‐support calls was high with 96 per cent of calls having been successfully received by families. All parents agreed that the telephone calls were a useful part of the programme and felt that the materials were helpful for managing challenging behaviour. Paired‐samples t ‐tests showed significant reductions for challenging behaviour from pre‐ to post‐intervention. Parenting practices also significantly improved over the course of the intervention. In general, parents rated a high level of consumer satisfaction with the Signposts programme and its content. Originality/value – Overall, these preliminary findings support the potential clinical utility of a telephone‐support version of the Signposts programme to improve parenting skills and to reduce challenging child behaviour following TBI. This study has provided the impetus for a larger clinical research trial to be conducted.

Journal

Social Care and NeurodisabilityEmerald Publishing

Published: Feb 4, 2014

Keywords: Children; Telehealth; Traumatic brain injury; Behaviour intervention

References