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A STUDY IN COOPERATION

A STUDY IN COOPERATION October, 1943 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERIN G 277 in it opening only one way is causing considerable resentment, and we feel that the time has arrived to ventilate it at the moment Aircraft Engineering when we are publishing, from a neutral source, the first full descrip­ Th e Monthly Scientific and Technical tion of a Russian aeroplane. An entry-door which has a strong spring preventing all egress becomes after a time an irksome barrier. Orga n of the Aeronautical Engineering When we wished to publish for the information of our readers an Professio n account of the machines with which the Red Air Force was equipped Editor:Lieut.-Col. W. Lockwood Marsh, O.B.E.,F.R.Ae.S., M.S.A.E., F.I.Ae.S. 16 months ago we had to rely entirely on German sources for both descriptions and photographs—which shows how little validity there could be in the plea of the need for secrecy on security grounds. This unhelpful take-all-and-give-nothing policy is not calculated to foster those friendly feelings which we are constantly being urged to feel towards our Eastern Ally. H E description of the LAGG-3 we publish in this issue is the first to give anything like full details of any Soviet aeroplane The Aeroplane tha t we can recall having seen. It comes from a Swedish As for the LAGG-3 itself it seems to be a good, sound, reasonably source and is, it would appear, based on'information obtained from efficient machine with nothing particularly striking in its general at least three machines of this type captured in Finland. Unfor­ design. Any outstanding points are to be found in details. We tunately the original translation was by no means impeccable and should, incidentally', have liked to have had some information on though attempts have been made to effect improvement it is still the engine. There is even less knowledge available, if that were not altogether satisfactory. possible, on the design of Russian engines than there is of the aeroplanes. The utilization of the exhaust gases to provide an inert Contrasted Attitudes layer in the fuel tanks is interesting and, so far as we are aware, We have waited long and wearily for authentic details of some quite novel. Altogether, in spite of the translation defects to which Russian aeroplanes to be released by the authorities of that country we have referred, the account constitutes an exceptionally intelligent in the same way as is done by the other Allied countries as soon as description of an aeroplane on which the writer of it is to be con­ it is clear that the enemy have captured examples sufficiently gratulated. It is, for instance, most informative to learn that each intact to give them full information, and it is therefore reasonable of the three machines examined had a different device for balancing on security grounds to aljow publication. There has been a steady the control surfaces; pointing to difficulties that had been met flow of Allied types of aeroplane to Russia, some of which have been with in this direction. The article also contains the first details adopted and some rejected, and all concerned there have had we have seen, though even now hardly enough to do more, perhaps, ample opportunities of examining in every detail* these machines than whet the appetite, of the Russian rocket-assisted bomb; in —with, in some instances, as can readily be seen, beneficial results regard to which there had been hitherto little more than rumour on Russian design. and almost indecipherable photographs. One-way Traffic Wooden Construction We have yet to hear, however, of any Russian type being brought to this country, or America, for similar test and examination. The outstanding feature of the' machine in general is, of course, Indeed, the few Russian aeroplanes that have had occasion to land the fact that it is of all-wood construction utilizing plies made up in this country have immediately been surrounded by an armed from home-grown timber. It is, thus, the only operational machine guard and all observers (even, according to our information, those in service, except the British Mosquito, which entirely avoids the use who, we would have imagined, would have been authorized to of metal. On this account, we have taken the opportunity of make a full inspection) warned off and kept at a distance from which publishing also in this issue a translation of a German article (for only a general idea of the outline features of the machine gained. which we are indebted to R. T. P.) describing the results of examin­ This has always seemed to us an extraordinarily mistrustful and ation of wooden components used in the LAGG-3 and two other unco-operative attitude, particularly in a nation which is constantly Russian aeroplanes. It is on the usual thorough lines of a typical calling for more and more aid from others. We feel very strongly German investigation including two interesting tables giving that there should be more give and less take, at any rate in respect the strength characteristics of the various types of timber and to the interchange of knowledge on the design and production methods of laminating or " compacting " them. of aeroplanes—which is the matter on which we are here concerned. British designers, and pilots, will envy the Finns the opportunities afforded them for examining on the ground and testing in the air Personal Experience this example of modern Russian practice in aeroplane design.' We have, in our small way, had very striking experience of this one-way traffic in connexion with AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING. A considerable number of copies of this paper is exported each month DIRECT INJECTION to Russia and for many years we used to send free copies, at their request, to various research and technical organizations over there. We complete in this issue a very comprehensive account of the When we found, however, after some years that, in spite of repeated design and operation of the fuel-injection systems fitted in three requests for some reciprocity, all pleas for a fair exchange were met types of German aeroplane. There has hitherto been a dearth of with stony silence we stopped sending these copies. Needless to say, information in regard to what is, after all, the only original con­ the organizations concerned are now among our subscribers ; but tribution that Germany has made to the development of the aero­ we still get no technical information out of Russia. engine and, indeed, the only striking departure from convention in internal-combustion engine design, apart from the introduction Interchange of Ideas of the sleeve valve, that we can recall almost since its original There is the freest possible interchange between America and inception. Controversy will continue to rage as to whether direct England, we are glad to say, to the benefit of both parties, but injection through a jet or the more usual carburettor system is there is no such communion with Russia simply because of the more advantageous, particularly at high altitudes; though it is attitude taken up by the Soviet authorities. Production engineers significant that no other country has yet followed the German lead in this country are, for example, fully informed of all the latest it may ultimately prove desirable to adopt some sort of a com­ methods in use in the United States, but we know of no one in this promise between the two. However that may be, a full information country who has the remotest idea of the size, layout, or equipment on' the systems in use in German aeroplanes is very welcome—we ■of one single aeroplane factory in the U.S.S.R. had ourselves been seeking it for some considerable time—and our readers will be grateful to the team of collaborators who have taken The Never-Open Door so much trouble to prepare it for them. The erection, and maintenance, of this blank wall with a door http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

A STUDY IN COOPERATION

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 15 (10): 1 – Oct 1, 1943

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Emerald Publishing
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Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb031058
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Abstract

October, 1943 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERIN G 277 in it opening only one way is causing considerable resentment, and we feel that the time has arrived to ventilate it at the moment Aircraft Engineering when we are publishing, from a neutral source, the first full descrip­ Th e Monthly Scientific and Technical tion of a Russian aeroplane. An entry-door which has a strong spring preventing all egress becomes after a time an irksome barrier. Orga n of the Aeronautical Engineering When we wished to publish for the information of our readers an Professio n account of the machines with which the Red Air Force was equipped Editor:Lieut.-Col. W. Lockwood Marsh, O.B.E.,F.R.Ae.S., M.S.A.E., F.I.Ae.S. 16 months ago we had to rely entirely on German sources for both descriptions and photographs—which shows how little validity there could be in the plea of the need for secrecy on security grounds. This unhelpful take-all-and-give-nothing policy is not calculated to foster those friendly feelings which we are constantly being urged to feel towards our Eastern Ally. H E description of the LAGG-3 we publish in this issue is the first to give anything like full details of any Soviet aeroplane The Aeroplane tha t we can recall having seen. It comes from a Swedish As for the LAGG-3 itself it seems to be a good, sound, reasonably source and is, it would appear, based on'information obtained from efficient machine with nothing particularly striking in its general at least three machines of this type captured in Finland. Unfor­ design. Any outstanding points are to be found in details. We tunately the original translation was by no means impeccable and should, incidentally', have liked to have had some information on though attempts have been made to effect improvement it is still the engine. There is even less knowledge available, if that were not altogether satisfactory. possible, on the design of Russian engines than there is of the aeroplanes. The utilization of the exhaust gases to provide an inert Contrasted Attitudes layer in the fuel tanks is interesting and, so far as we are aware, We have waited long and wearily for authentic details of some quite novel. Altogether, in spite of the translation defects to which Russian aeroplanes to be released by the authorities of that country we have referred, the account constitutes an exceptionally intelligent in the same way as is done by the other Allied countries as soon as description of an aeroplane on which the writer of it is to be con­ it is clear that the enemy have captured examples sufficiently gratulated. It is, for instance, most informative to learn that each intact to give them full information, and it is therefore reasonable of the three machines examined had a different device for balancing on security grounds to aljow publication. There has been a steady the control surfaces; pointing to difficulties that had been met flow of Allied types of aeroplane to Russia, some of which have been with in this direction. The article also contains the first details adopted and some rejected, and all concerned there have had we have seen, though even now hardly enough to do more, perhaps, ample opportunities of examining in every detail* these machines than whet the appetite, of the Russian rocket-assisted bomb; in —with, in some instances, as can readily be seen, beneficial results regard to which there had been hitherto little more than rumour on Russian design. and almost indecipherable photographs. One-way Traffic Wooden Construction We have yet to hear, however, of any Russian type being brought to this country, or America, for similar test and examination. The outstanding feature of the' machine in general is, of course, Indeed, the few Russian aeroplanes that have had occasion to land the fact that it is of all-wood construction utilizing plies made up in this country have immediately been surrounded by an armed from home-grown timber. It is, thus, the only operational machine guard and all observers (even, according to our information, those in service, except the British Mosquito, which entirely avoids the use who, we would have imagined, would have been authorized to of metal. On this account, we have taken the opportunity of make a full inspection) warned off and kept at a distance from which publishing also in this issue a translation of a German article (for only a general idea of the outline features of the machine gained. which we are indebted to R. T. P.) describing the results of examin­ This has always seemed to us an extraordinarily mistrustful and ation of wooden components used in the LAGG-3 and two other unco-operative attitude, particularly in a nation which is constantly Russian aeroplanes. It is on the usual thorough lines of a typical calling for more and more aid from others. We feel very strongly German investigation including two interesting tables giving that there should be more give and less take, at any rate in respect the strength characteristics of the various types of timber and to the interchange of knowledge on the design and production methods of laminating or " compacting " them. of aeroplanes—which is the matter on which we are here concerned. British designers, and pilots, will envy the Finns the opportunities afforded them for examining on the ground and testing in the air Personal Experience this example of modern Russian practice in aeroplane design.' We have, in our small way, had very striking experience of this one-way traffic in connexion with AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING. A considerable number of copies of this paper is exported each month DIRECT INJECTION to Russia and for many years we used to send free copies, at their request, to various research and technical organizations over there. We complete in this issue a very comprehensive account of the When we found, however, after some years that, in spite of repeated design and operation of the fuel-injection systems fitted in three requests for some reciprocity, all pleas for a fair exchange were met types of German aeroplane. There has hitherto been a dearth of with stony silence we stopped sending these copies. Needless to say, information in regard to what is, after all, the only original con­ the organizations concerned are now among our subscribers ; but tribution that Germany has made to the development of the aero­ we still get no technical information out of Russia. engine and, indeed, the only striking departure from convention in internal-combustion engine design, apart from the introduction Interchange of Ideas of the sleeve valve, that we can recall almost since its original There is the freest possible interchange between America and inception. Controversy will continue to rage as to whether direct England, we are glad to say, to the benefit of both parties, but injection through a jet or the more usual carburettor system is there is no such communion with Russia simply because of the more advantageous, particularly at high altitudes; though it is attitude taken up by the Soviet authorities. Production engineers significant that no other country has yet followed the German lead in this country are, for example, fully informed of all the latest it may ultimately prove desirable to adopt some sort of a com­ methods in use in the United States, but we know of no one in this promise between the two. However that may be, a full information country who has the remotest idea of the size, layout, or equipment on' the systems in use in German aeroplanes is very welcome—we ■of one single aeroplane factory in the U.S.S.R. had ourselves been seeking it for some considerable time—and our readers will be grateful to the team of collaborators who have taken The Never-Open Door so much trouble to prepare it for them. The erection, and maintenance, of this blank wall with a door

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Oct 1, 1943

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