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A Seaplane for the Atlantic

A Seaplane for the Atlantic 136 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERIN G May, 1937 Th e Big Four-Engined 2,400 h.p. Twin-Float Sixteen-To n Hamburger Seaplane H E Hamburger Ha-139 is an all-metal, four-engined, twin-float seaplane recently buil t in Hamburg to meet the require- ments of the Deutsche Lufthansa for transatlantic mail service. It was designed and built by the Hamburger Flugzeubau G.m.b.H., who are a new aviation department of Blohm and Voss, the well-known shipbuilders of Hamburg. The company was formed in 1933 with Dr. Richard Vogt as Director and has in the past built several training machines ; the new Ha-139 which is attached a stressed skin metal cover­ Catapul t Launching being the largest and most important machine ing. It is of oval section throughout, with a The Ha-139 has been undergoing tests on built up to the present time. The seaplane well rounded nose and very small frontal area. the Elbe with Chief Pilot Helmuth-Wasa has a gross weight of 16 tons and a range of Quarters for a crew of four are accommodated Rodig in charge. It is intended that it shall be 5,000 kilometres (3,100 miles) at its cruising immediately behind the nose. Aft of these launched at sea from a catapult, a system of speed of 250 k.p.h. (155 m.p.h.). The four positions is a freight hold 3.50 metres in length launching which has been successfully employed engines give a total of 2,400 h.p. and 6.5 cubic metres in volume. The tail for several years by the Lufthansa in maintain­ plane is of monoplane type and is carried above ing a mail service across the South Atlantic with Single-Spar Wing th e fuselage on a short cabane. It is braced Dornier flying boats. This system offers The design of the Ha-139 is unorthodox, and from below to the fuselage by two struts on advantages in the launching of a heavily loaded incorporates several interesting innovations cither side. The tailplane carries two fins and machine at sea, such as economy of power at already introduced and tested on the aircraft the take-off. of other nations. The monoplane wing is built up around a single tubular steel spar of Refuelling at Sea large dimensions, which serves as a fuel tank ; Several nations are on the point of ex­ The Ha-139 is intended for service over recalling the Duncanson spar which is well perimentin g with aircraf t services across the North Atlantic to New York, plans known in England. Viewed from the front, the North Atlantic. Germany is pro­ calling for catapult launchings from a ship the wing is in the form of a W, the design and posing to adopt the system already fully stationed off Horta in the Azores. The distance characteristics of which are well known. The tried out over the South Atlantic of using between this point and New York is about seaplanes refuelled from depot ships floats are supported by articulated joints so 4,000 kilometres (2,485 miles). At New York stationed on the route and then cata­ tha t their incidences may be varied ; a system pulted into the air. For the North a second ship will be stationed for servicing which has been used in America on the Seversky Atlanti c the large float seaplane here the machine and from which it will be cata­ seaplane. Of particular interest is the use of described has been designed by a newly pulted for the return journey. heavy oil engines, which the Lufthansa has formed aircraft construction branch During the past few years the Germans have employed with considerable success on Atlantic of a well-known firm of Hamburg used three ships from which Dornier flying crossings and in which they have great con­ shipbuilder s boats have been catapulted. or picked up at fidence. sea and serviced. These are the Westfalen,* th e Schwabenland and the Ostmark. A fourth Wide-Spa n Centre Section vessel will be added to this fleet next summer. The Ha-139 has a cantilever low wing com­ two rudders at its extremities, each fin and posed of two short outer sections and a wide rudder combined forming a disc. Ne w Depot Ship centre section, which carries the four engines, The floats are divided into twelve watertight This will be the motor vessel Friesenland, which th e float supports and the fuel. The wing area compartments and are supported below the was launched at Kiel on March 15, and which is 117 sq. metres and the span 27 metres. The inner engines at the lower extremities of the is at present being fitted out. The new motor monospar, about which the centre section is wing spar. The supports are entirely enclosed in vessel is of 6,500 registered tons, has a length built, has a length of 16 metres, and forms a W. streamline fairings and are so mounted as to of 138 metres and a beam of 17 metres. It will The fuselage attachments are fixed to the permit variation of the incidence of the floats. be propelled by two Mannesmann-Diesel upper extremities and the float supports to the Each float is supported by a principal tubular engines of 2,500 h.p. each, enabling her to make lower. The engines are carried in the leading stru t descending vertically from the wing spar 16 nautical miles an hour. M.V. Friesenland edge, the mountings being attached to the to which it is attached by a joint allowing will probably be stationed off Horta and the spar. The monospar is of welded steel tube, articulation. Its attachment to the float Schwabenland, at present being fitted with a a form of construction in which Blohm and offsets the efforts from bow to stern so that no larger and more powerful catapult, will be Voss specialize. It has a capacity of 6,000 moment of torsion is transmitted to the wing stationed at New York. litres (1,320 gals.) of heavy oil, sufficient to give spar. This arrangement also permits variation th e seaplane a range of 5,000 kilometres The catapults used are built by Heinkel at of incidence to provide the optimum for both (3,100 miles) at cruising speed. The two outer Wanemünde, the type K-9 at present used on flight and landings. sections have rounded tips and are attached the Ostmark being capable of launching a t o the centre section by large joints. They are 15-ton machine at a speed of 158 kras. per Diesel Engines built up round duralumin tubular spars. The hour. The four Junkers Diesel Jumo 205-C 600 h.p. wing has a metal covering of smooth sheet. engines are carried in the leading edge on PRINCIPA L CHARACTERISTICS mountings attached to the wing spar. They are Span .. .. .. .. 27 m. (88 ft. 7 in.) Monocoqu e Fuselage neatly faired in by streamline cowlings. Each Wing area . . . . 117 sq. m. (1,259 sq. ft.) engine drives a three-bladed Junkers-Hamilton The monocoque fuselage is built up round a Length .. .. .. 19.5 m. (64 ft.) controllable-pitch airscrew. number of transverse frames and stiffeners to Height .. .. .. 5.2 m. (17 ft.) Total power .. . . .. 2,400 h.p. Gross weight. . 16,000 kgs. (16 tons approx.) Wing loading. . 137 kgs./sq. m. (28 lb./sq . ft.) Power loading 6.7 kgs./h.p. (14 lb./h.p.) PERFORMANCE Maximum speed .. 300 k.p.h. (186 m.p.h.) Cruising speed .. 250 k.p.h. (155 m.p.h.) Range a t cruising speed 5,000 kms. (3,100 miles) * See " A Seaplane Depot Ship," ΑIRCRAFΤ ENGINEERING, Vol. V, April 1930, p. 87. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

A Seaplane for the Atlantic

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 9 (5): 1 – May 1, 1937

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb030180
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Abstract

136 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERIN G May, 1937 Th e Big Four-Engined 2,400 h.p. Twin-Float Sixteen-To n Hamburger Seaplane H E Hamburger Ha-139 is an all-metal, four-engined, twin-float seaplane recently buil t in Hamburg to meet the require- ments of the Deutsche Lufthansa for transatlantic mail service. It was designed and built by the Hamburger Flugzeubau G.m.b.H., who are a new aviation department of Blohm and Voss, the well-known shipbuilders of Hamburg. The company was formed in 1933 with Dr. Richard Vogt as Director and has in the past built several training machines ; the new Ha-139 which is attached a stressed skin metal cover­ Catapul t Launching being the largest and most important machine ing. It is of oval section throughout, with a The Ha-139 has been undergoing tests on built up to the present time. The seaplane well rounded nose and very small frontal area. the Elbe with Chief Pilot Helmuth-Wasa has a gross weight of 16 tons and a range of Quarters for a crew of four are accommodated Rodig in charge. It is intended that it shall be 5,000 kilometres (3,100 miles) at its cruising immediately behind the nose. Aft of these launched at sea from a catapult, a system of speed of 250 k.p.h. (155 m.p.h.). The four positions is a freight hold 3.50 metres in length launching which has been successfully employed engines give a total of 2,400 h.p. and 6.5 cubic metres in volume. The tail for several years by the Lufthansa in maintain­ plane is of monoplane type and is carried above ing a mail service across the South Atlantic with Single-Spar Wing th e fuselage on a short cabane. It is braced Dornier flying boats. This system offers The design of the Ha-139 is unorthodox, and from below to the fuselage by two struts on advantages in the launching of a heavily loaded incorporates several interesting innovations cither side. The tailplane carries two fins and machine at sea, such as economy of power at already introduced and tested on the aircraft the take-off. of other nations. The monoplane wing is built up around a single tubular steel spar of Refuelling at Sea large dimensions, which serves as a fuel tank ; Several nations are on the point of ex­ The Ha-139 is intended for service over recalling the Duncanson spar which is well perimentin g with aircraf t services across the North Atlantic to New York, plans known in England. Viewed from the front, the North Atlantic. Germany is pro­ calling for catapult launchings from a ship the wing is in the form of a W, the design and posing to adopt the system already fully stationed off Horta in the Azores. The distance characteristics of which are well known. The tried out over the South Atlantic of using between this point and New York is about seaplanes refuelled from depot ships floats are supported by articulated joints so 4,000 kilometres (2,485 miles). At New York stationed on the route and then cata­ tha t their incidences may be varied ; a system pulted into the air. For the North a second ship will be stationed for servicing which has been used in America on the Seversky Atlanti c the large float seaplane here the machine and from which it will be cata­ seaplane. Of particular interest is the use of described has been designed by a newly pulted for the return journey. heavy oil engines, which the Lufthansa has formed aircraft construction branch During the past few years the Germans have employed with considerable success on Atlantic of a well-known firm of Hamburg used three ships from which Dornier flying crossings and in which they have great con­ shipbuilder s boats have been catapulted. or picked up at fidence. sea and serviced. These are the Westfalen,* th e Schwabenland and the Ostmark. A fourth Wide-Spa n Centre Section vessel will be added to this fleet next summer. The Ha-139 has a cantilever low wing com­ two rudders at its extremities, each fin and posed of two short outer sections and a wide rudder combined forming a disc. Ne w Depot Ship centre section, which carries the four engines, The floats are divided into twelve watertight This will be the motor vessel Friesenland, which th e float supports and the fuel. The wing area compartments and are supported below the was launched at Kiel on March 15, and which is 117 sq. metres and the span 27 metres. The inner engines at the lower extremities of the is at present being fitted out. The new motor monospar, about which the centre section is wing spar. The supports are entirely enclosed in vessel is of 6,500 registered tons, has a length built, has a length of 16 metres, and forms a W. streamline fairings and are so mounted as to of 138 metres and a beam of 17 metres. It will The fuselage attachments are fixed to the permit variation of the incidence of the floats. be propelled by two Mannesmann-Diesel upper extremities and the float supports to the Each float is supported by a principal tubular engines of 2,500 h.p. each, enabling her to make lower. The engines are carried in the leading stru t descending vertically from the wing spar 16 nautical miles an hour. M.V. Friesenland edge, the mountings being attached to the to which it is attached by a joint allowing will probably be stationed off Horta and the spar. The monospar is of welded steel tube, articulation. Its attachment to the float Schwabenland, at present being fitted with a a form of construction in which Blohm and offsets the efforts from bow to stern so that no larger and more powerful catapult, will be Voss specialize. It has a capacity of 6,000 moment of torsion is transmitted to the wing stationed at New York. litres (1,320 gals.) of heavy oil, sufficient to give spar. This arrangement also permits variation th e seaplane a range of 5,000 kilometres The catapults used are built by Heinkel at of incidence to provide the optimum for both (3,100 miles) at cruising speed. The two outer Wanemünde, the type K-9 at present used on flight and landings. sections have rounded tips and are attached the Ostmark being capable of launching a t o the centre section by large joints. They are 15-ton machine at a speed of 158 kras. per Diesel Engines built up round duralumin tubular spars. The hour. The four Junkers Diesel Jumo 205-C 600 h.p. wing has a metal covering of smooth sheet. engines are carried in the leading edge on PRINCIPA L CHARACTERISTICS mountings attached to the wing spar. They are Span .. .. .. .. 27 m. (88 ft. 7 in.) Monocoqu e Fuselage neatly faired in by streamline cowlings. Each Wing area . . . . 117 sq. m. (1,259 sq. ft.) engine drives a three-bladed Junkers-Hamilton The monocoque fuselage is built up round a Length .. .. .. 19.5 m. (64 ft.) controllable-pitch airscrew. number of transverse frames and stiffeners to Height .. .. .. 5.2 m. (17 ft.) Total power .. . . .. 2,400 h.p. Gross weight. . 16,000 kgs. (16 tons approx.) Wing loading. . 137 kgs./sq. m. (28 lb./sq . ft.) Power loading 6.7 kgs./h.p. (14 lb./h.p.) PERFORMANCE Maximum speed .. 300 k.p.h. (186 m.p.h.) Cruising speed .. 250 k.p.h. (155 m.p.h.) Range a t cruising speed 5,000 kms. (3,100 miles) * See " A Seaplane Depot Ship," ΑIRCRAFΤ ENGINEERING, Vol. V, April 1930, p. 87.

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: May 1, 1937

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