A Revolving Welding Table

A Revolving Welding Table December , 1932 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING Workshop and Production Section A Useful Accessory for Uninterrupted Work N the last few years a considerable amount of research work has been carried out on th e manufacturing possibilities of special steels for aircraft construction suitable for welding. At the present time welding enters not only into the detail component parts of aircraft but is becoming much more popular for structural members. I n the manufacture of welded articles the part s are usually mounted in a jig or fixture, and for production purposes it Can easily be arranged that these are made to three or four standar d sizes to a table. I n the revolving table for welding described here it is assumed that the table fixing head is made to couple up to standard sizes of base, arranged on jigs or fixtures. Th e object of the table is to enable the operator to weld on any par t of a fitting without interruption. This is an advantage, especially for circular welds (which occur very frequently on aircraft detail parts) as the operation, being continuous, ensures an even weld. The lay­ ou t of the two benches described is extremely and angles welded or bolted together. In simple, and both designs can be very cheaply table centre is fixed, carried on a ball-bearing th e centre of the framework the footplate is constructed, in metal to lessen risk of fire. housed on the spindle. To this table centre, attached, with its spindle and head. On one The first design (Fig. 1) of the pedestal type, th e standard size jigs or fixtures are attached. side of the bench, racks are fixed for the various consists of a cast-iron base on which is mounted When the footplate is turned by the sizes of torches, the other side accommodating a vertical steel spindle. On the outside of the operator's feet, the head plate revolves, leaving a bin for flux and welding rods. spindle a tube is fitted, carrying at its lower bot h hands free for the torch and welding rods. In both designs a special head plate can be end a foot, or tread plate, mounted on a collar, I n the second design the lay-out is similar, fixed on the centre for jigs and fixtures. which runs on a ball thrust-race fitted in the with the exception that the framework of the The head plates can be adapted to the many base. At the top end of the tube the work bench is constructed of ordinary channel-iron shapes and sizes peculiar to aircraft parts, and quick operation for removal of fixtures and jigs from the head is obtainable if a quick release form of clamping device is fitted. Large frames, to carry shapes such as fairing formers or cowl rings, may be made to fit on the head and the work revolved to enable the operator to work on all the stays, clips, fastener brackets, etc., without having to shift his position. Many uses may be found for this bench, but its use for large or small circular welded fittings is of chief importance. The lay-out of such a bench makes it an ideal proposition for production work, while its low initial cost, coupled with the fact that it may be used to cover the whole range of sizes in most present-day aircraft parts, makes it a useful addition to the equipment of large or small repair or maintenance shops; when a special type of head plate, with tee slots and cross clamping plates and spigots for holding fittings could be embodied. H. \V. D. Cross-Channel Radio Communication A micro-ray equipment giving radio com­ very small wavelength, transmitting and receiving mitting messages. In this way typewritten messages munication on the shortest wavelength employed aerials less than 1 in. long are used. Micro-rays will be sent across the Channel by radio, thus pro­ at any radio station in the world has been ordered oscillating at a rate of about 2,000,000,000 times viding a permanent record at each end. The use by the Air Ministry for use in connection with a second are generated in a special micro-radion of teleprinters will also help to overcome the cross-channel flying services. This equipment will tube. These oscillations are led to the trans­ language difficulty, since it is easier for a man be manufactured by Standard Telephones & Cables, mitting aerial and are then concentrated by a to understand a written message in a language Limited, in their Hendon factory. combination of mirrors into a fine pencil of rays, with which he is unfamiliar than a spoken one. Some eighteen months ago the first demon­ which are transmitted from a circular reflector Messages can also be received on a teleprinter stration of practical radio telephony on a wave­ about 10 ft. in diameter. This reflector is focused during the temporary absence of the operator. length below one metre was given by the Inter­ on to a similar reflector at the receiving station. A great advantage of the use of micro-rays is national Telephone and Telegraph Laboratories of The equipment ordered by the Air Ministry will the fact that they are almost entirely unaffected Hendon, working in co-operation with the Labora­ be located at Lympne, and will operate in con­ by atmospheric conditions. Another advantage tories of Le Materiel Telephonique, Paris. On junction with a similar equipment ordered by the is that on this extremely low wave-band there that occasion radio telephonic communication was French Air Ministry to be situated at St. Inglevert is practically no interference from congestion of established between Dover and Calais on a wave­ It will be used for announcing the arrival and the ether or from nearby machinery. length of approximately 18 centimetres. departure of aeroplanes that are not fitted with It is expected that the station will be in operation The equipment now ordered will operate on radio and for routine service messages. An early next spring, and its use will relieve the an even lower wavelength—in the neighbourhood interesting feature of this new service will be the volume of traffic at Croydon and Lympne wireless of 15 centimetres. For communication on this use of teleprinters for both receiving and trans- stations very considerably. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

A Revolving Welding Table

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, Volume 4 (12): 1 – Dec 1, 1932

Loading next page...
 
/lp/emerald-publishing/a-revolving-welding-table-zV2UBXnNvT
Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb029637
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

December , 1932 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING Workshop and Production Section A Useful Accessory for Uninterrupted Work N the last few years a considerable amount of research work has been carried out on th e manufacturing possibilities of special steels for aircraft construction suitable for welding. At the present time welding enters not only into the detail component parts of aircraft but is becoming much more popular for structural members. I n the manufacture of welded articles the part s are usually mounted in a jig or fixture, and for production purposes it Can easily be arranged that these are made to three or four standar d sizes to a table. I n the revolving table for welding described here it is assumed that the table fixing head is made to couple up to standard sizes of base, arranged on jigs or fixtures. Th e object of the table is to enable the operator to weld on any par t of a fitting without interruption. This is an advantage, especially for circular welds (which occur very frequently on aircraft detail parts) as the operation, being continuous, ensures an even weld. The lay­ ou t of the two benches described is extremely and angles welded or bolted together. In simple, and both designs can be very cheaply table centre is fixed, carried on a ball-bearing th e centre of the framework the footplate is constructed, in metal to lessen risk of fire. housed on the spindle. To this table centre, attached, with its spindle and head. On one The first design (Fig. 1) of the pedestal type, th e standard size jigs or fixtures are attached. side of the bench, racks are fixed for the various consists of a cast-iron base on which is mounted When the footplate is turned by the sizes of torches, the other side accommodating a vertical steel spindle. On the outside of the operator's feet, the head plate revolves, leaving a bin for flux and welding rods. spindle a tube is fitted, carrying at its lower bot h hands free for the torch and welding rods. In both designs a special head plate can be end a foot, or tread plate, mounted on a collar, I n the second design the lay-out is similar, fixed on the centre for jigs and fixtures. which runs on a ball thrust-race fitted in the with the exception that the framework of the The head plates can be adapted to the many base. At the top end of the tube the work bench is constructed of ordinary channel-iron shapes and sizes peculiar to aircraft parts, and quick operation for removal of fixtures and jigs from the head is obtainable if a quick release form of clamping device is fitted. Large frames, to carry shapes such as fairing formers or cowl rings, may be made to fit on the head and the work revolved to enable the operator to work on all the stays, clips, fastener brackets, etc., without having to shift his position. Many uses may be found for this bench, but its use for large or small circular welded fittings is of chief importance. The lay-out of such a bench makes it an ideal proposition for production work, while its low initial cost, coupled with the fact that it may be used to cover the whole range of sizes in most present-day aircraft parts, makes it a useful addition to the equipment of large or small repair or maintenance shops; when a special type of head plate, with tee slots and cross clamping plates and spigots for holding fittings could be embodied. H. \V. D. Cross-Channel Radio Communication A micro-ray equipment giving radio com­ very small wavelength, transmitting and receiving mitting messages. In this way typewritten messages munication on the shortest wavelength employed aerials less than 1 in. long are used. Micro-rays will be sent across the Channel by radio, thus pro­ at any radio station in the world has been ordered oscillating at a rate of about 2,000,000,000 times viding a permanent record at each end. The use by the Air Ministry for use in connection with a second are generated in a special micro-radion of teleprinters will also help to overcome the cross-channel flying services. This equipment will tube. These oscillations are led to the trans­ language difficulty, since it is easier for a man be manufactured by Standard Telephones & Cables, mitting aerial and are then concentrated by a to understand a written message in a language Limited, in their Hendon factory. combination of mirrors into a fine pencil of rays, with which he is unfamiliar than a spoken one. Some eighteen months ago the first demon­ which are transmitted from a circular reflector Messages can also be received on a teleprinter stration of practical radio telephony on a wave­ about 10 ft. in diameter. This reflector is focused during the temporary absence of the operator. length below one metre was given by the Inter­ on to a similar reflector at the receiving station. A great advantage of the use of micro-rays is national Telephone and Telegraph Laboratories of The equipment ordered by the Air Ministry will the fact that they are almost entirely unaffected Hendon, working in co-operation with the Labora­ be located at Lympne, and will operate in con­ by atmospheric conditions. Another advantage tories of Le Materiel Telephonique, Paris. On junction with a similar equipment ordered by the is that on this extremely low wave-band there that occasion radio telephonic communication was French Air Ministry to be situated at St. Inglevert is practically no interference from congestion of established between Dover and Calais on a wave­ It will be used for announcing the arrival and the ether or from nearby machinery. length of approximately 18 centimetres. departure of aeroplanes that are not fitted with It is expected that the station will be in operation The equipment now ordered will operate on radio and for routine service messages. An early next spring, and its use will relieve the an even lower wavelength—in the neighbourhood interesting feature of this new service will be the volume of traffic at Croydon and Lympne wireless of 15 centimetres. For communication on this use of teleprinters for both receiving and trans- stations very considerably.

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Dec 1, 1932

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off