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A Question of Time

A Question of Time Aircraft Engineering THE MONTHLY SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL ORGAN OF THE AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING PROFESSION VOL XIX No 223 S.B.A.C. DISPLAY SEPTEMBER 9TH-14TH STAND NO. 64 SEPTEMBER 1947 extent to the appearance of our pages but readers would no doubt be prepared to put up with this for the sake of increased 'topicality' in ITH a monthly periodical such as AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING, our contents. which has to cover a subject with ever-increasing ramifica­ W tions spreading over a wider range than, perhaps, any An Apology other branch of engineering, it is clearly inevitable that each particu­ In view of what we have written above it will be appreciated that lar issue cannot contain an article which will be of immediate value every article that can deal with a technical subject in non-mathemati­ to every reader and that, therefore, the individual may have to wait cal style is, in these days, doubly welcome. We have had in mind for some months before his particular interest is catered for by a paper many months to deal with the difficulty of maintaining control of dealing with it. This is accentuated in these days by the exigencies of aeroplanes suffering from loss of the power of one engine—a present conditions, which arise not only from the extreme shortage problem of the highest importance and some complexity. We had in of paper hampering every aspect of literary activity but from an fact intended to publish a detailed examination of the subject on acute scarcity of manpower hitting all British industrial occupations mathematical lines contained in a report kindly sent us by the and more particularly the printing trade, as it is not treated as an NATIONAAL LUCHTVAARTLABORATORIUM of Amsterdam. When, 'essential' industry with a claim to preferential treatment in this however, M R A. H. YATES recently submitted to us the article on the respect. This comes particularly hard on AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING same subject treated on completely non-mathematical lines which which, if it is to fulfil its function of disseminating knowledge on a appears in this issue, we decided to substitute his article for the highly abstruse technical subject, must publish articles involving a Dutch paper, contenting ourselves with a reference to the latter (to high proportion of formulae—since the lessons they are trying to which we drew M R YATES'S attention) and a short summary appear­ convey can be expressed in no other way. ing at the end of the article. We desire to offer our apologies to our Dutch friends for treating them in this cavalier fashion, which we A Cumulative Effect hope they will understand in view of what we have written earlier. Unfortunately at the present time the setting of these mathematical formulae is a very serious problem as there is a strictly limited number An Example for Others of compositors capable of undertaking this highly skilled work, and The article by M R YATES is, we venture to assert, a brilliant ex­ it is also a long and laborious process which has to be done by hand ample of the possibilities in treating a complicated technical subject and cannot be operated by machine. It is, actually, the fact that there in simple language. It covers all the aspects of control in flight under is now a time lag of six weeks to two months between the sending asymmetric power—as affecting both the pilot and designer—com­ down of a manuscript involving mathematics by us to our printers pletely and concisely. It has, also, the immeasurable advantage, from and the receipt of the proofs. The inevitable consequence of this is the point of view we touched on in our first paragraph, of having so that articles of this character have now to be very carefully 'rationed' wide an appeal that we can scarcely visualize any of our readers who and spread out over the issues. This has the deplorable, but quite un­ will not find something to interest him in it ; while various questions avoidable, result of widening the gap between an acceptance of any are raised—such as the desirability or otherwise of taking off with individual article and its appearance in our pages—with the most full power, the benefits and dangers of a locking device for castoring regrettable result that information regarding a new development or wheels and the advantages and disadvantages of feathering, or even new technique is much delayed in appearance. This gap is, in fact, at constant-pitch, propellers—which will provide fruitful matters for the present time something in the order of eighteen months and is discussion wherever students, or other more experienced enthusiasts, tending to widen rather than close. Actually, we are informed, this meet. compares by no means unfavourably with the experience of the leading learned societies, as a paper accepted by one of them is unlikely to be published for two or three years. A New Contact We also welcome MR YATES'S paper because, although he is A Note for Contributors already known as the author of the article on 'Carpets and Lattices' We are opening our heart on these matters in this way so that in our January, 1946, issue, he is the first active member of the teaching staff of the COLLEGE OF AERONAUTICS to send an original authors may understand the position and readers may also appre­ contribution to AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING—albeit several of his present ciate it and forgive the fact that in some instances subjects are dealt colleagues have, if we may so put it, served their apprenticeship in with which might well have been expected to be covered in these columns much sooner. It also gives us the opportunity of begging these columns. We hope that this will be the forerunner of articles prospective contributors to keep down the amount of mathematics from other members of the staff, the benefit of whose knowledge and experience could advantageously be made available to a wider circle —and tables, which also involve hand-setting—to the bare minimum than their own students through these columns. consonant with clarity of exposition. It would be a very real help if both formulae and tables could be clearly lettered—or, in the case In this connexion we should like to take the opportunity of wel­ of tables, typed—so that they can be reproduced photographically by coming a new contemporary in Potential, the magazine of the our blockmakers instead of having to be set up in type by hand by COLLEGE'S Students' Society, a copy of the first number of which our printers. This course will, we are afraid, be detrimental to some the Editors have been kind enough to send us. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

A Question of Time

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 19 (9): 1 – Sep 1, 1947

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb031545
Publisher site
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Abstract

Aircraft Engineering THE MONTHLY SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL ORGAN OF THE AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING PROFESSION VOL XIX No 223 S.B.A.C. DISPLAY SEPTEMBER 9TH-14TH STAND NO. 64 SEPTEMBER 1947 extent to the appearance of our pages but readers would no doubt be prepared to put up with this for the sake of increased 'topicality' in ITH a monthly periodical such as AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING, our contents. which has to cover a subject with ever-increasing ramifica­ W tions spreading over a wider range than, perhaps, any An Apology other branch of engineering, it is clearly inevitable that each particu­ In view of what we have written above it will be appreciated that lar issue cannot contain an article which will be of immediate value every article that can deal with a technical subject in non-mathemati­ to every reader and that, therefore, the individual may have to wait cal style is, in these days, doubly welcome. We have had in mind for some months before his particular interest is catered for by a paper many months to deal with the difficulty of maintaining control of dealing with it. This is accentuated in these days by the exigencies of aeroplanes suffering from loss of the power of one engine—a present conditions, which arise not only from the extreme shortage problem of the highest importance and some complexity. We had in of paper hampering every aspect of literary activity but from an fact intended to publish a detailed examination of the subject on acute scarcity of manpower hitting all British industrial occupations mathematical lines contained in a report kindly sent us by the and more particularly the printing trade, as it is not treated as an NATIONAAL LUCHTVAARTLABORATORIUM of Amsterdam. When, 'essential' industry with a claim to preferential treatment in this however, M R A. H. YATES recently submitted to us the article on the respect. This comes particularly hard on AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING same subject treated on completely non-mathematical lines which which, if it is to fulfil its function of disseminating knowledge on a appears in this issue, we decided to substitute his article for the highly abstruse technical subject, must publish articles involving a Dutch paper, contenting ourselves with a reference to the latter (to high proportion of formulae—since the lessons they are trying to which we drew M R YATES'S attention) and a short summary appear­ convey can be expressed in no other way. ing at the end of the article. We desire to offer our apologies to our Dutch friends for treating them in this cavalier fashion, which we A Cumulative Effect hope they will understand in view of what we have written earlier. Unfortunately at the present time the setting of these mathematical formulae is a very serious problem as there is a strictly limited number An Example for Others of compositors capable of undertaking this highly skilled work, and The article by M R YATES is, we venture to assert, a brilliant ex­ it is also a long and laborious process which has to be done by hand ample of the possibilities in treating a complicated technical subject and cannot be operated by machine. It is, actually, the fact that there in simple language. It covers all the aspects of control in flight under is now a time lag of six weeks to two months between the sending asymmetric power—as affecting both the pilot and designer—com­ down of a manuscript involving mathematics by us to our printers pletely and concisely. It has, also, the immeasurable advantage, from and the receipt of the proofs. The inevitable consequence of this is the point of view we touched on in our first paragraph, of having so that articles of this character have now to be very carefully 'rationed' wide an appeal that we can scarcely visualize any of our readers who and spread out over the issues. This has the deplorable, but quite un­ will not find something to interest him in it ; while various questions avoidable, result of widening the gap between an acceptance of any are raised—such as the desirability or otherwise of taking off with individual article and its appearance in our pages—with the most full power, the benefits and dangers of a locking device for castoring regrettable result that information regarding a new development or wheels and the advantages and disadvantages of feathering, or even new technique is much delayed in appearance. This gap is, in fact, at constant-pitch, propellers—which will provide fruitful matters for the present time something in the order of eighteen months and is discussion wherever students, or other more experienced enthusiasts, tending to widen rather than close. Actually, we are informed, this meet. compares by no means unfavourably with the experience of the leading learned societies, as a paper accepted by one of them is unlikely to be published for two or three years. A New Contact We also welcome MR YATES'S paper because, although he is A Note for Contributors already known as the author of the article on 'Carpets and Lattices' We are opening our heart on these matters in this way so that in our January, 1946, issue, he is the first active member of the teaching staff of the COLLEGE OF AERONAUTICS to send an original authors may understand the position and readers may also appre­ contribution to AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING—albeit several of his present ciate it and forgive the fact that in some instances subjects are dealt colleagues have, if we may so put it, served their apprenticeship in with which might well have been expected to be covered in these columns much sooner. It also gives us the opportunity of begging these columns. We hope that this will be the forerunner of articles prospective contributors to keep down the amount of mathematics from other members of the staff, the benefit of whose knowledge and experience could advantageously be made available to a wider circle —and tables, which also involve hand-setting—to the bare minimum than their own students through these columns. consonant with clarity of exposition. It would be a very real help if both formulae and tables could be clearly lettered—or, in the case In this connexion we should like to take the opportunity of wel­ of tables, typed—so that they can be reproduced photographically by coming a new contemporary in Potential, the magazine of the our blockmakers instead of having to be set up in type by hand by COLLEGE'S Students' Society, a copy of the first number of which our printers. This course will, we are afraid, be detrimental to some the Editors have been kind enough to send us.

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Sep 1, 1947

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