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A multi‐district model for the management of disease‐modifying treatments in multiple sclerosis

A multi‐district model for the management of disease‐modifying treatments in multiple sclerosis This paper's objective is to develop a model for the appropriate and equitable use of disease-modifying treatments in multiple sclerosis. The prevalence and incidence of multiple sclerosis was established in Leeds. A specialist multiple sclerosis team with two consultant neurologists and a multiple sclerosis support nurse was based at one centre. The team co-operated with purchasers to develop a model of care. This included a referral protocol, strict prescribing criteria, counselling and education of patients, the use of patient-centred outcome measures and training and feedback to other neurologists. A total of 217 people with multiple sclerosis were assessed from April 1997 to March 2000. Our experience suggests that a centralised multi-district clinic developed by close collaboration between clinicians and health purchasers and operating under agreed rules is a feasible and effective model for the managed introduction of new treatments to the NHS. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png British Journal of Clinical Governance Emerald Publishing

A multi‐district model for the management of disease‐modifying treatments in multiple sclerosis

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 MCB UP Ltd. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1466-4100
DOI
10.1108/14664100210446650
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This paper's objective is to develop a model for the appropriate and equitable use of disease-modifying treatments in multiple sclerosis. The prevalence and incidence of multiple sclerosis was established in Leeds. A specialist multiple sclerosis team with two consultant neurologists and a multiple sclerosis support nurse was based at one centre. The team co-operated with purchasers to develop a model of care. This included a referral protocol, strict prescribing criteria, counselling and education of patients, the use of patient-centred outcome measures and training and feedback to other neurologists. A total of 217 people with multiple sclerosis were assessed from April 1997 to March 2000. Our experience suggests that a centralised multi-district clinic developed by close collaboration between clinicians and health purchasers and operating under agreed rules is a feasible and effective model for the managed introduction of new treatments to the NHS.

Journal

British Journal of Clinical GovernanceEmerald Publishing

Published: Dec 1, 2002

Keywords: National Health Service; Co‐operation; Disease; Regulations; Modelling

References