Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

A Lesson from Sweden

A Lesson from Sweden Aircraft Engineering TH E MONTHLY ORGAN OF THE AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING PROFESSION VOL XXV No 291 MAY 1953 developments are taking place; largely because we have not the staff to be able to send representatives constantly visiting the firms to find T may be remembered that last December we published a descrip­ out what is 'going on'. Also, to be perfectly frank, the practice of tion, culled from Saab Sonics, the house journal of SVENSKA 'nosing round' the various aircraft factories in search of material is I AEROPLAN AKTIEBOLAGET, of a new high-speed wind-tunnel repugnant to us. installed by the firm. We now follow this in this issue by another We have always felt, and still feel, that if a firm has anything to paper, reproduced from the same source, on wing structures of disclose of interest to other engineers it should be willing to take the future aircraft by HR. LJUNGSTROM, the company's structural initiative and ask us if we would be prepared to accept it for publica­ development engineer. tion. It is not enough, as most British firms seem to think, to send us If we may say so without undue arrogance it seems to us note­ a manifolded copy of a semi-popular 'hand out' simultaneously with, worthy that in two consecutive issues one firm's house magazine or later than, its release to the weekly, and even the daily, press. should publish articles that struck us as so technically informative as Such general releases are of no use to us for publication purposes to be worth publishing for wider circulation in AIRCRAFT ENGINEER­ because, firstly, before they can appear in AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING ING. After all, we claim, if not to maintain, at any rate to aim at a they have appeared widely and been read—we almost said ad nauseam— certain standard in the articles we select for publication, and it is in by every adult in the country capable of reading and, secondly, fact we believe quite unprecedented for us to choose two examples because they contain the minimum amount of information of from the same commercial source within so short a period. Indeed, genuine interest to anyone with an engineering training. generally speaking, we are, we are thankful to say, so well provided with original articles that we only rarely reproduce previously pub­ An Example to Others lished papers—except in the case of lectures read to professional In striking contrast to the general attitude against which we societies or institutions—at all. have been girding above is the enlightened approach of DOWTY EQUIPMENT LTD. as exemplified by the article on its spill-burner In Contrast fuel system which also appears in this issue. In this instance, the firm issued a short general note on the system, which it sent to us in It is, from an insular point of view, sad that so seldom the house conjunction with others. This was followed by a wholly unexpected, journal of any British firm produces a contribution of comparable and most welcome, call from a representative bringing with quality. With only one or perhaps two exceptions—which we had him a copy of the full description, as it is here published, with the better not name—British publications of this class do not cater for suggestion that we might wish to publish it in AIRCRAFT ENGINEER­ the seriously-inquiring reader and confine themselves mainly to ING, which seemed a suitable medium for its appearance. This is an 'beating the drum' in regard to the supposedly high qualities of their example of exactly the sort of treatment for which we are pleading. products without vouchsafing much information as to the reason for Here was a voluntary offer of a technical article containing full de­ forming these laudatory views. tails of a matter which is clearly of the greatest interest to every aero­ The whole matter is, of course, closely bound up with the general nautical engineer. We can only add that if any other firm in the question of publicity. As we have on several occasions said in the British industry cares to follow this admirable lead we shall be only past; in this country the desire for secrecy is not usually found too ready to co-operate to the full extent of our capabilities. We can where one would expect to look for it. In our experience, even in only hope that these words will not fall on stony ground. these days of 'cold war' and such considerations, the limitations on publication imposed by National security are as nothing in com­ parison with the tight hold maintained on all the details of their Fresh Ground products by the average British aircraft firm. It is quite astonishing To revert to the actual contents of the Swedish paper. It particu­ how little technical information is voluntarily released of the design larly appealed to us because it approached the subject of the new and detailed construction of aircraft produced in this country. So far wing shapes from an aspect which we have not seen dealt with else­ as AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING is concerned we have offered to us quite where. They are studied from the structural point of view—though a number of articles on technical subjects by individual employees of it is true that aerodynamics is inevitably also covered—whereas most firms—though, even so, these are heavily outnumbered by contribu­ of the previous papers we have seen (such as, for instance, M R KEITH tions from those in Government service—but it is rare in the extreme LUCAS'S British Association lecture) confined themselves almost for us to have sent to us unasked any article of a character likely to exclusively to the aerodynamic field. One particular type of con­ interest engineers from a firm as such. If we desire to publish such struction, the multi-cell design, has been the subject of particular an article we have invariably to ask for it. This, we maintain, is quite examination in Sweden and we are hoping to publish a report on it wrong because we are not in a position to know what interesting in the near future. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

A Lesson from Sweden

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 25 (5): 1 – May 1, 1953

Loading next page...
 
/lp/emerald-publishing/a-lesson-from-sweden-V9tWcd3UxB
Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb032287
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Aircraft Engineering TH E MONTHLY ORGAN OF THE AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING PROFESSION VOL XXV No 291 MAY 1953 developments are taking place; largely because we have not the staff to be able to send representatives constantly visiting the firms to find T may be remembered that last December we published a descrip­ out what is 'going on'. Also, to be perfectly frank, the practice of tion, culled from Saab Sonics, the house journal of SVENSKA 'nosing round' the various aircraft factories in search of material is I AEROPLAN AKTIEBOLAGET, of a new high-speed wind-tunnel repugnant to us. installed by the firm. We now follow this in this issue by another We have always felt, and still feel, that if a firm has anything to paper, reproduced from the same source, on wing structures of disclose of interest to other engineers it should be willing to take the future aircraft by HR. LJUNGSTROM, the company's structural initiative and ask us if we would be prepared to accept it for publica­ development engineer. tion. It is not enough, as most British firms seem to think, to send us If we may say so without undue arrogance it seems to us note­ a manifolded copy of a semi-popular 'hand out' simultaneously with, worthy that in two consecutive issues one firm's house magazine or later than, its release to the weekly, and even the daily, press. should publish articles that struck us as so technically informative as Such general releases are of no use to us for publication purposes to be worth publishing for wider circulation in AIRCRAFT ENGINEER­ because, firstly, before they can appear in AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING ING. After all, we claim, if not to maintain, at any rate to aim at a they have appeared widely and been read—we almost said ad nauseam— certain standard in the articles we select for publication, and it is in by every adult in the country capable of reading and, secondly, fact we believe quite unprecedented for us to choose two examples because they contain the minimum amount of information of from the same commercial source within so short a period. Indeed, genuine interest to anyone with an engineering training. generally speaking, we are, we are thankful to say, so well provided with original articles that we only rarely reproduce previously pub­ An Example to Others lished papers—except in the case of lectures read to professional In striking contrast to the general attitude against which we societies or institutions—at all. have been girding above is the enlightened approach of DOWTY EQUIPMENT LTD. as exemplified by the article on its spill-burner In Contrast fuel system which also appears in this issue. In this instance, the firm issued a short general note on the system, which it sent to us in It is, from an insular point of view, sad that so seldom the house conjunction with others. This was followed by a wholly unexpected, journal of any British firm produces a contribution of comparable and most welcome, call from a representative bringing with quality. With only one or perhaps two exceptions—which we had him a copy of the full description, as it is here published, with the better not name—British publications of this class do not cater for suggestion that we might wish to publish it in AIRCRAFT ENGINEER­ the seriously-inquiring reader and confine themselves mainly to ING, which seemed a suitable medium for its appearance. This is an 'beating the drum' in regard to the supposedly high qualities of their example of exactly the sort of treatment for which we are pleading. products without vouchsafing much information as to the reason for Here was a voluntary offer of a technical article containing full de­ forming these laudatory views. tails of a matter which is clearly of the greatest interest to every aero­ The whole matter is, of course, closely bound up with the general nautical engineer. We can only add that if any other firm in the question of publicity. As we have on several occasions said in the British industry cares to follow this admirable lead we shall be only past; in this country the desire for secrecy is not usually found too ready to co-operate to the full extent of our capabilities. We can where one would expect to look for it. In our experience, even in only hope that these words will not fall on stony ground. these days of 'cold war' and such considerations, the limitations on publication imposed by National security are as nothing in com­ parison with the tight hold maintained on all the details of their Fresh Ground products by the average British aircraft firm. It is quite astonishing To revert to the actual contents of the Swedish paper. It particu­ how little technical information is voluntarily released of the design larly appealed to us because it approached the subject of the new and detailed construction of aircraft produced in this country. So far wing shapes from an aspect which we have not seen dealt with else­ as AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING is concerned we have offered to us quite where. They are studied from the structural point of view—though a number of articles on technical subjects by individual employees of it is true that aerodynamics is inevitably also covered—whereas most firms—though, even so, these are heavily outnumbered by contribu­ of the previous papers we have seen (such as, for instance, M R KEITH tions from those in Government service—but it is rare in the extreme LUCAS'S British Association lecture) confined themselves almost for us to have sent to us unasked any article of a character likely to exclusively to the aerodynamic field. One particular type of con­ interest engineers from a firm as such. If we desire to publish such struction, the multi-cell design, has been the subject of particular an article we have invariably to ask for it. This, we maintain, is quite examination in Sweden and we are hoping to publish a report on it wrong because we are not in a position to know what interesting in the near future.

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: May 1, 1953

There are no references for this article.