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A German LowPowered Aeroplane

A German LowPowered Aeroplane THE Arado Ar79 is a sidebyside twoseater for ab initio civil or military training. It is yet another example of the trend towards lower engine powers which has been making itself evident abroad, both in the Continent and in the U.S.A., for the last few years, but is only just beginning to appear in this country. The 105 h.p. Hirth engine raises this machine out of the ultralight class, but it is still considerably lowerpowered than are similar aeroplanes in this country. An interesting feature of this machine, common to other Continental designs for the same purpose, is the employment of composite wood and metal construction. It has to be remembered, however, when comparing these foreign aeroplanes with our own designs that, almost without exception, the thorny problem of Ming wings has been avoided. When this is the case many parts can be simplified and the machine, can be made invariably much lighter and often more clean aerodynamically. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

A German LowPowered Aeroplane

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 10 (10): 2 – Oct 1, 1938

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb030382
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

THE Arado Ar79 is a sidebyside twoseater for ab initio civil or military training. It is yet another example of the trend towards lower engine powers which has been making itself evident abroad, both in the Continent and in the U.S.A., for the last few years, but is only just beginning to appear in this country. The 105 h.p. Hirth engine raises this machine out of the ultralight class, but it is still considerably lowerpowered than are similar aeroplanes in this country. An interesting feature of this machine, common to other Continental designs for the same purpose, is the employment of composite wood and metal construction. It has to be remembered, however, when comparing these foreign aeroplanes with our own designs that, almost without exception, the thorny problem of Ming wings has been avoided. When this is the case many parts can be simplified and the machine, can be made invariably much lighter and often more clean aerodynamically.

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Oct 1, 1938

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