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A Field Guide to East African Reptiles (2nd edition)

A Field Guide to East African Reptiles (2nd edition) Science and technology Reference Reviews Volume 32 · Number 7/8 · 2018 · 29-36 gets and entry but I am not sure what it has to do to DNA and other biochemical data. This is a with the environment. Having given some general occurrence in taxonomy – it upsets some indication of the variety and range, I should now but it does give a better picture of evolution. The book begins with an introduction and mention the Dictionary’s strengths. It outlines of advice on using its content. This is followed by a laws and regulation is thorough. A good range of engineering methodologies are described in some series of essays. These cover the zoogeography of detail. It is good on toxicology food safety and the the area – sea water to mountain tops, advise on like. It covers soil issues, and general ecological observing and recording, conservation and a note on reptile taxonomy and safety. What reptiles are topics. The book ends with a list of references and is also dealt with. They are scaly tetrapods (many further reading. of which have given up legs). This includes The author is a retired assistant professor of environmental health and the author of about 100 tortoises and turtles, lizards, worm lizards, books. He has chosen this mixed dictionary/ crocodiles and snakes – and this is the order they encyclopedia combination as the best way to are dealt with in the book. There is an introduction to each of these groups, structure this book. My initial reaction was followed by an introduction to the family and then confused as the bold capital headings in the the individual species description. This starts with encyclopedia entries were obvious and the details for identification, followed by an account of dictionary entries were lost. The trick is to follow the page content information at the top of the habitat and distribution and then natural history, which cover aspects such as reproduction, territorial page. Once I had understood the way the book was activity and food sources. The last can be quite put together, I found my way about it fairly easily. specific; for example, there are snakes which feed I get the impression that most of the ideas that on slugs and others that feed on centipedes. At Frank Spellman has had to explain to students some points, short dichotomous keys are provided over his many years of teaching have become to reduce suborders to families, or to distinguish entries in this book. There is certainly much of species in families. There are distribution maps, but interest here. The more I looked through its pages some species are so restricted that it is difficult to the more I realised its usefulness. The book will see them on the map. For more widespread species probably be of most use in education, but it could the maps are helpful. The book ends with a glossary also be of use in major public libraries. It does have and some line drawings illustrating specific scale a US emphasis in the legislation entries. positions and patterns which are used in John Goodier Consultant, Goldhawk Information, London, UK identification. There is an index to common and scientific names. The descriptions have one or two photographs of the creatures. RR 2018/209 Beyond its use as a field guide, this book can act as an introduction to reptiles and to individual A Field Guide to East African Reptiles species. Snakes are amazing from an evolutionary (2nd edition) point of view – they have given up limbs and Stephen Spawls and others developed a complex jaw structure; some have Bloomsbury given up sight and they are all technically deaf having no external ear, but the can feel/hear London vibration through the skeleton. The other groups are also deserving of study. 624 pp. John Goodier ISBN 978 1 4729 3561 8 (print); ISBN 978 1 4729 3562 5 Consultant, Goldhawk Information, London, UK (ePub); ISBN 978 1 4729 4309 5 (ePDF) £35 $50 (print); £37.80 $45 (e-formats) RR 2018/210 Keywords Africa, Guides and handbooks, Reptiles Medical Heritage Library: Opening Access Review DOI 10.1108/RR-08-2018-0127 to Seven Centuries of Medical History This is a second edition of a book first published in Medical Heritage Library Inc. 2002. It covers Tanzania, Kenya, Uganda and 2010- Burundi: countries to the east of the African Rift URL: www.medicalheritage.org/ Valley. The first edition covered 432 species and Last visited August 2018 Gratis this edition has 492 entries. This increase in species is general for reptiles. At the time of the Keywords Health and medicine, History first edition there were around 2,900 species of Review DOI 10.1108/RR-08-2018-0117 snake in the world; there are now 4,600 known species. The other change is that about 100 species Medical Heritage Library is an online resource for have had their generic name changed; mainly due medical history resources available in the public http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Reference Reviews Emerald Publishing

A Field Guide to East African Reptiles (2nd edition)

Reference Reviews , Volume 32 (7/8): 1 – Sep 17, 2018

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Emerald Publishing
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Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
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0950-4125
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10.1108/RR-08-2018-0127
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Abstract

Science and technology Reference Reviews Volume 32 · Number 7/8 · 2018 · 29-36 gets and entry but I am not sure what it has to do to DNA and other biochemical data. This is a with the environment. Having given some general occurrence in taxonomy – it upsets some indication of the variety and range, I should now but it does give a better picture of evolution. The book begins with an introduction and mention the Dictionary’s strengths. It outlines of advice on using its content. This is followed by a laws and regulation is thorough. A good range of engineering methodologies are described in some series of essays. These cover the zoogeography of detail. It is good on toxicology food safety and the the area – sea water to mountain tops, advise on like. It covers soil issues, and general ecological observing and recording, conservation and a note on reptile taxonomy and safety. What reptiles are topics. The book ends with a list of references and is also dealt with. They are scaly tetrapods (many further reading. of which have given up legs). This includes The author is a retired assistant professor of environmental health and the author of about 100 tortoises and turtles, lizards, worm lizards, books. He has chosen this mixed dictionary/ crocodiles and snakes – and this is the order they encyclopedia combination as the best way to are dealt with in the book. There is an introduction to each of these groups, structure this book. My initial reaction was followed by an introduction to the family and then confused as the bold capital headings in the the individual species description. This starts with encyclopedia entries were obvious and the details for identification, followed by an account of dictionary entries were lost. The trick is to follow the page content information at the top of the habitat and distribution and then natural history, which cover aspects such as reproduction, territorial page. Once I had understood the way the book was activity and food sources. The last can be quite put together, I found my way about it fairly easily. specific; for example, there are snakes which feed I get the impression that most of the ideas that on slugs and others that feed on centipedes. At Frank Spellman has had to explain to students some points, short dichotomous keys are provided over his many years of teaching have become to reduce suborders to families, or to distinguish entries in this book. There is certainly much of species in families. There are distribution maps, but interest here. The more I looked through its pages some species are so restricted that it is difficult to the more I realised its usefulness. The book will see them on the map. For more widespread species probably be of most use in education, but it could the maps are helpful. The book ends with a glossary also be of use in major public libraries. It does have and some line drawings illustrating specific scale a US emphasis in the legislation entries. positions and patterns which are used in John Goodier Consultant, Goldhawk Information, London, UK identification. There is an index to common and scientific names. The descriptions have one or two photographs of the creatures. RR 2018/209 Beyond its use as a field guide, this book can act as an introduction to reptiles and to individual A Field Guide to East African Reptiles species. Snakes are amazing from an evolutionary (2nd edition) point of view – they have given up limbs and Stephen Spawls and others developed a complex jaw structure; some have Bloomsbury given up sight and they are all technically deaf having no external ear, but the can feel/hear London vibration through the skeleton. The other groups are also deserving of study. 624 pp. John Goodier ISBN 978 1 4729 3561 8 (print); ISBN 978 1 4729 3562 5 Consultant, Goldhawk Information, London, UK (ePub); ISBN 978 1 4729 4309 5 (ePDF) £35 $50 (print); £37.80 $45 (e-formats) RR 2018/210 Keywords Africa, Guides and handbooks, Reptiles Medical Heritage Library: Opening Access Review DOI 10.1108/RR-08-2018-0127 to Seven Centuries of Medical History This is a second edition of a book first published in Medical Heritage Library Inc. 2002. It covers Tanzania, Kenya, Uganda and 2010- Burundi: countries to the east of the African Rift URL: www.medicalheritage.org/ Valley. The first edition covered 432 species and Last visited August 2018 Gratis this edition has 492 entries. This increase in species is general for reptiles. At the time of the Keywords Health and medicine, History first edition there were around 2,900 species of Review DOI 10.1108/RR-08-2018-0117 snake in the world; there are now 4,600 known species. The other change is that about 100 species Medical Heritage Library is an online resource for have had their generic name changed; mainly due medical history resources available in the public

Journal

Reference ReviewsEmerald Publishing

Published: Sep 17, 2018

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