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A Descriptive Catalogue of the Medieval Manuscripts in the Library of Peterhouse, Cambridge

A Descriptive Catalogue of the Medieval Manuscripts in the Library of Peterhouse, Cambridge are noted and discussed, in particular, that of an earlier catalogue by M.R. James (James 1899): “This General works was one of James’ earliest descriptive catalogues and was of books that he liked least – law and scholastic theology – and so show signs of impatience”. The entries themselves are detailed and RR 2017/121 comprehensive and all consistent in contents and A Descriptive Catalogue of the Medieval layout. Following the heading of each book, with its Manuscripts in the Library of origin and century, is its structure described in detail: Peterhouse, Cambridge from number and size of leaves, through collation to binding, with notes on appearance where relevant R.M. Thomson (for example, the use of rulings). Contents are listed D.S. Brewer in detail, beginning with any blank or introductory Cambridge folios before stating authors and titles of works included, as well as the folios where they feature. xli  230 pp. Hands are described, for example, “Written in ISBN 978 1 84384 441 9 £95 $165 low-grade gothic rotunda book-hand. Annotated by John Warkworth and others” (No.166). Decorations Published for Peterhouse, Cambridge by D.S. Brewer are noted and, where appropriate, described. A Keywords Medieval manuscripts, Libraries history of each book gives details of inclusion in Review DOI 10.1108/RR-02-2017-0036 previous catalogues, names of donors and any other relevant information. A bibliography gives references When we think of catalogues of manuscripts, we to entries in previous catalogues or other published usually imagine mediaeval illuminated and illustrated sources. works. But in this instance, to quote: “Not many of Supplementing the introduction and the catalogue the books contain extensive or important itself are a list of abbreviations and two indexes. The illumination, and this absence has been exacerbated abbreviations list is a very comprehensive, seven-page by massive vandalism apparently mainly perpetrated list of works consulted and quoted. The indexes are in the late sixteenth century”. As a result, this gives to manuscripts and printed books (listed by their the collection, and its catalogue, a particular interest institutional locations) and a general index of names and value. What we see here is a catalogue of a and titles. A set of colour plates at the end of the working library for scholars, with few rare or unique volume contains 113 illustrations: of bindings (1-6), texts but comprising titles for a university curriculum of text extracts (7-87), of decoration and illumination of the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries: works of (88-109) and four of surviving features of the Aristotle (in Latin) and of Thomas Aquinas, Albertus fifteenth century library. Magnus and John Duns Scotus, among others. Professor Thomson is Professor Emeritus of Commentaries on the texts are also featured. Medieval History at the University of Tasmania, and Founded in 1384, the Peterhouse Library his catalogue is the result of annual visits to expanded through donations: very few books were Peterhouse College between 2012 and 2015. He has actually purchased and only three of the survivors also previously published catalogues of the mediaeval were bought by the College. Although records of the manuscripts of Merton College and Corpus Christi Library, especially in its earlier years, are “opaque”, College, Oxford. As well as being a work of there is considerable information about previous outstanding, detailed scholarship – that scholarship owners. Two hundred and seventy-seven surviving worn deceptively lightly – this is also the most manuscripts are detailed in the catalogue, together handsome, large, quarto volume, appropriately and with around 300 fragments in, or removed from, the clearly designed and beautifully printed. All in all, this bindings of early printed books. The detailed is not only a fascinating, detailed insight into a information presented in this catalogue allows an mediaeval working library and its contents, but also a intriguing picture of a mediaeval, scholarly working handsome volume reflecting well on the author, library. publisher and subject. This itself is a work of meticulous and detailed Stuart James scholarship. The introduction explains all the Past Editor Reference Reviews and formerly background that emerges on the history of the University Librarian, University of Paisley, library, its contents and its donors. At one stage, this Paisley, UK was a chained library and the catalogue notes individual cases where marks of chaining are to be found. Previous work on catalogues of the Library Reference Reference Reviews James, M.R. (1899), A Descriptive Catalogue of the Volume 31 · Number 5 · 2017 · p. 7 Manuscripts in the Library of Peterhouse, Cambridge © Emerald Publishing Limited · ISSN 0950-4125 University Press, Cambridge. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Reference Reviews Emerald Publishing

A Descriptive Catalogue of the Medieval Manuscripts in the Library of Peterhouse, Cambridge

Reference Reviews , Volume 31 (5): 1 – Jun 19, 2017

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0950-4125
DOI
10.1108/RR-02-2017-0036
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Abstract

are noted and discussed, in particular, that of an earlier catalogue by M.R. James (James 1899): “This General works was one of James’ earliest descriptive catalogues and was of books that he liked least – law and scholastic theology – and so show signs of impatience”. The entries themselves are detailed and RR 2017/121 comprehensive and all consistent in contents and A Descriptive Catalogue of the Medieval layout. Following the heading of each book, with its Manuscripts in the Library of origin and century, is its structure described in detail: Peterhouse, Cambridge from number and size of leaves, through collation to binding, with notes on appearance where relevant R.M. Thomson (for example, the use of rulings). Contents are listed D.S. Brewer in detail, beginning with any blank or introductory Cambridge folios before stating authors and titles of works included, as well as the folios where they feature. xli  230 pp. Hands are described, for example, “Written in ISBN 978 1 84384 441 9 £95 $165 low-grade gothic rotunda book-hand. Annotated by John Warkworth and others” (No.166). Decorations Published for Peterhouse, Cambridge by D.S. Brewer are noted and, where appropriate, described. A Keywords Medieval manuscripts, Libraries history of each book gives details of inclusion in Review DOI 10.1108/RR-02-2017-0036 previous catalogues, names of donors and any other relevant information. A bibliography gives references When we think of catalogues of manuscripts, we to entries in previous catalogues or other published usually imagine mediaeval illuminated and illustrated sources. works. But in this instance, to quote: “Not many of Supplementing the introduction and the catalogue the books contain extensive or important itself are a list of abbreviations and two indexes. The illumination, and this absence has been exacerbated abbreviations list is a very comprehensive, seven-page by massive vandalism apparently mainly perpetrated list of works consulted and quoted. The indexes are in the late sixteenth century”. As a result, this gives to manuscripts and printed books (listed by their the collection, and its catalogue, a particular interest institutional locations) and a general index of names and value. What we see here is a catalogue of a and titles. A set of colour plates at the end of the working library for scholars, with few rare or unique volume contains 113 illustrations: of bindings (1-6), texts but comprising titles for a university curriculum of text extracts (7-87), of decoration and illumination of the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries: works of (88-109) and four of surviving features of the Aristotle (in Latin) and of Thomas Aquinas, Albertus fifteenth century library. Magnus and John Duns Scotus, among others. Professor Thomson is Professor Emeritus of Commentaries on the texts are also featured. Medieval History at the University of Tasmania, and Founded in 1384, the Peterhouse Library his catalogue is the result of annual visits to expanded through donations: very few books were Peterhouse College between 2012 and 2015. He has actually purchased and only three of the survivors also previously published catalogues of the mediaeval were bought by the College. Although records of the manuscripts of Merton College and Corpus Christi Library, especially in its earlier years, are “opaque”, College, Oxford. As well as being a work of there is considerable information about previous outstanding, detailed scholarship – that scholarship owners. Two hundred and seventy-seven surviving worn deceptively lightly – this is also the most manuscripts are detailed in the catalogue, together handsome, large, quarto volume, appropriately and with around 300 fragments in, or removed from, the clearly designed and beautifully printed. All in all, this bindings of early printed books. The detailed is not only a fascinating, detailed insight into a information presented in this catalogue allows an mediaeval working library and its contents, but also a intriguing picture of a mediaeval, scholarly working handsome volume reflecting well on the author, library. publisher and subject. This itself is a work of meticulous and detailed Stuart James scholarship. The introduction explains all the Past Editor Reference Reviews and formerly background that emerges on the history of the University Librarian, University of Paisley, library, its contents and its donors. At one stage, this Paisley, UK was a chained library and the catalogue notes individual cases where marks of chaining are to be found. Previous work on catalogues of the Library Reference Reference Reviews James, M.R. (1899), A Descriptive Catalogue of the Volume 31 · Number 5 · 2017 · p. 7 Manuscripts in the Library of Peterhouse, Cambridge © Emerald Publishing Limited · ISSN 0950-4125 University Press, Cambridge.

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Reference ReviewsEmerald Publishing

Published: Jun 19, 2017

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